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^.v. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE 

Irrljtealfliiirnl nnfi latiinil lisinrq 
MAGAZINE, 

lUuir lt<il;eh nntircv tljc ^ivecixoxx of Wye Society 

formed in that county, a. i). 1853. 
Edited by Rev. E. H. Coddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 
VOL. XXXVII. 
1911—1912. 




DEVIZES : 

C. II. W'ooDW Ai;i>, I'^XCHANCK lU'ILDINCS, STATION lu>M> 



December, 1912. 



CONTENTS OF YOL. XXXVII. 



No. CXY. June, 1911. 

The Society's MSS. — Bradford, &c. {continued) 1 

Knap Hill Camp : By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington 42 

Salisbury in 1455 {Liber Niger) ; By the Kev. Edmund Nevill, 

B.A.,F.S.A '. . m 

Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age Found in Wiltshire, with a 

List of all known examples found in the county : By the Rev. 

E. H. GODDARD 92 

Notes 159 

Wilts Obituary 163 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 180 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 200 

Wiltshire Illustrations 202 

Wiltshire Portraits... , ,.... 203 

Additions to Museum and Library 205 

Accounts of the Society for the Year 1910 208 

No. CXVI. December, 1911, 

A Descriptive Catalogue of the Printed Maps of Wiltshire from 1576 
to the publication of the 25in. Ordnance Survey, 1885 : By T. 

Chubb, of the Map Room, British Museum 211 

No. CXVII. June, 1912. 

The Fifty-Eighth General Meeting at Malmesbury 327 

The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury : By A. R. Malden, 

F.S.A 339 

The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland Raised in the 

Division of Warminster, 1648 353 

Arachnida of Wiltshire : By the Rev. O. Pick ard- Cambridge, 

M.A., F.R.S., &c 380 

Bewley Court, Lacock : By Harold Brakspear, F.S.A 391 

Notes on the History of Wroughton : By Theresa Story Maskelyne 400 
Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, Clyffe Pypard, 

Compton Bassett, Hilmarton, Lydiard Tregoze, Winterbourne 

Bassett, and Winterbourne Monkton : By C. E. Ponting, F.S.A. 417 

Notes 455 

Wilts Obituary 460 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 473 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 489 

Wiltshire Illustrations 492 

Wiltshire Portraits 493 

Additions to Museum and Library 496 

List of Officers and Members of the Society 499 

Accounts of the Society for the Year 1911 509 



CONTENTS OF VOL. XXXVII. iii. 

No. CXVIII. December, 1912. 

The Fifty-Ninth General Meeting at Devizes 513 

A Late Celtic Inhabited Site at All Cannings Cross Farm : By MiiS. 

M. E. CUNNINGTON 526 

Bronze Age Barrows on Arn Hill, Warminster : By Mrs. M. E. 

CUNNINGTON 539 

Tropenell Memoranda 542 

The Battle of Roundway Down : By thk Rev. E. J. Bodington ... 593 
The Removal of a Barrow on the Downs near Upavon : By Mrs. 

M. E. CUNNINGTON 603 

A Saxon Cemetery at " The Fox," Burton : By Mrs. M. E. Cunning- 
ton and the Rev. E. H. (^toddard 606 

Notes 609 

Wilts Obituary 616 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 620 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 631 

Wiltshire Portraits 632 

Wiltshire Illustrations 632 

Additions to Museum and Library 633 

Index to Vol. XXXVII \ 635 



fiUustratious. 

Flan of Knap Hill Camp, 44. Section B. — Knap Hill Camp, 45. Section 
1). — Knap Hill Camp, 50. Section C. — Knap Hill Camp, 52. Saxon 
Sword found at Knap Hill Camp, 54. Section A.— Knap Hill Camp, 59. 
Objects from Knap Hill, 62. Socketed looped Spearhead found under 
turf in a barrow, 94. Small Knife Dagger half melted with heat of funeral 
])ile, from barrow at Wilsford, 95. Tanged Dagger of Copper, Round- 
way, 97. Three Daggers from Mere Down Barrow, Brigmerston, and 
Normanton Bush Barrow, 98. Three Daggers from Winterbourne Stoke 
Barrow, Lake Barrow 8, and Row Barrow, near South Down Farm, 99. 
Dagger from Wilsford Ixirrow 100. Dagger (?) in the Stourhead 
Collection, 101. Three Bronze Celts from Wilsford and Swindon, 102. 
Sockt'ted Spearhead, Down S.W. of Beckhami)ton, 104. Razor, Barrow 
on Rollestone Down, 106. Lancet, Normanton Barrow, 107. Small 
Tanged Chisel, Barrow near Sidbury Hill, 108. Awl in wooden handle 
locality unknown, 108. Four Awls and Pins from Barrows at Winter-' 
bourne Stoke, Lake, Normanton and Silk Hill, 109. Two Pins from 
Everley and Shepherd's Shore, 110. Two Bracelets from Barrow near 
Lake, 111. Bronze Horns plated with Gold, Normanton, 112. PrtMii^- 
shaped implement from Barrow at Wilsford, 113. Plates 1 — \1., 
Bronze objects found in Wiltshire, 11(5. Plate VII. , Pulley Ring and 
large Ikitton of Lignite, and Gold Pcnannular Ring, 116. Marks on Hell 
at Potternt>, KJo. 



IV. CONTENTS OF VOL. XXXVII. 

Bewley Court, Lacock (fifteen Plans, Eievations, and Views, 390. Bewley 
Court ; Entrance Doorway, 393. Illustrations of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, 
Clyffe Pypard, Compton Bassett, Hilmarton, Lydiard Tregoze, Winter- 
bourne Bassett, and Winterbourne .\Ionkton Churches (twenty plates), 
454. Compton Bassett, Hour glass on pillar near pulpit, 429. Hilmarton, 
Screen, Passage to north aisle and Squint from the chancel, 433. Hil- 
marton ; passage from north aisle to chancel, with Squint and entrance 
to rood loft stairs, from the aisle, 433, 434. 

Plan of Site of Late Celtic Settlement at All Cannings Cross Farm, 529. 
Late Celtic pottery handles from All Cannings Cross Farm, 533. Plate L 
— Objects from Late Celtic Settlement at All Cannings Cross Farm, 534. 
Plates II. — VI. — Late Celtic Pottery from All Cannings Cross Farm, 535. 
Bronze Age Cinerary Urns from Barrow on Warminster Golf Links, 539. 
Whetstone of hard slaty stone found in Urn in Barrow on Warminster 
Golf Course, 540. Iron Seax, Spearhead, and Knife, Blue Glass 
Bead, from Saxon interments at " The Fox," Purton, 1912, 606. Bronze 
Knife Dagger from Barrow at Charlton, Donhead, 1832 ; Roman Enamel 
Brooch, site of Verlucio, 1828 ; Roman Bone Pins, Bromham Villa, 1840 ; 
Bronze Gilt Saucer Brooch, Bronze Pin, and Glass Beads, from Saxon 
interment near Mildenhall, 1827, 611. Polished Celt of Grey Stone with 
grooves on both edges, from Liddington, 613. Section of Stone Celt, 
showing grooves on the sides, 614. 



ERRATA. 

Page 68, I. 11, /or tendentis read tendentibus. 

., 69, I. "iS^for communari read communario. 

„ 85, Is. 3 and 4: from bottom, for prius read patris. 

„ 108, Is.Z and ^->,for Plate II. read Plate III. 

„ 167, Is. 5 and %^,for Feb. read March. 

„ 169, I. 4., for Pitt read Pitts. 

.. 182, /. 4: from bottom, for Qeo&rey read Geoffry. 

,, 186, l. 6 from bottom, for Wilts read Sarum. 

„ 188, 1. 24, for Rev. A. E. Aid worth read Mr. T. H. Baker. 

„ 200, I. '21, for Cailard read Caillard. 

,, 205. I. 4, omit bronze. 

„ 410, Is. 8 and 23, omit and heiress. 

„ 411, I. 9, omit Salthorpe. 

,, 493, /. f) from bottom, for Madder read Nadder. 

., 493, I. 4 from bottom, for Mayor read Major. 

See also slix>s facing pages 211, 417, 542. 



To face page 211. 

ERRATA. 

Page 228, 1. 10, /or Seaford read Seckford. 

„ 236, 1. 11, /or W. Johnson read W. Johnston. 

„ 289, I. 5, for J. Slater read I. Slater (twice). 

„ 295, 1. 6, for Purton read Porton. 

„ 310, I. 11, /or Edridge read Eldridge. 

„ 318, l. 6, for Miller, R. read Miller, A. 

„ 320, I. 23, for Philips, R. read Phillips. 



SOCIETY FORMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 185 3. 



EDITED BY 



To face page 417. 



ERRATA, 



410 /. 27. The tower and porch of Berwick Bassett are of stone, not 

brick. 
422, /. 22, omit (? by the Rev. Francis Goddard). 

427, /. Qfrom bottom, for Annie read Anne. 

428, /. 1,/or Elizabeth read Eliza. 

4")4, 1. 17, /or the Rev. Thomas Tliorold, buried Kcb. -IM-A. I7I7-S. n^id 
(iuronliiin-to Jack.s.)n'.s.h/A;v7/)tliL" Krv. .Jchn Hrin.^arii, air,l'l7l:.. 



Wilts Iiuiuisitioiies Rubt Muitem, Edwaid ill., RaiL ill., iii^iued 



j_7ocxvio, livan )Od2^Uii 



interment near Mildenhall, 1827, 611. Polished Celt of Grey Stone with 
grooves on both edges, from Liddington, 613. Section of Stone Celt, 
showing grooves on the sides, 614. 



No. cxy.^: 



JUNK, 1911. 




THE 



Vol. XXXVII. 



moor 



WILTSHIRE 

IrrjiaHiliigifitl nni Jintenil listortt 

MAGAZINE, 

^Oublt^Orti untfrr t\)e JOtrrrtton 

OF THE 

SOCIETY FORMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 185 3. 



EDITED BY 

RE\r. E. IT. GODDAKD, Cljffe Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

puintep and sold for tiik society iiy c. h. w()o^^vaud, 
4, St. John kStkkkt. 



Vricc 5.S'. (ill. Mduhcrs, iii'niis. 

Wilts ln(|uisiti(Mi(v^ P.).s( MoiNmu, K.lwai.l 111.. Pail 111., i<Mir,l 



NOTICE TO MEMBEES. 

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volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

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Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
tary : the Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 



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Price £2 10s. 






No. CXV. JUNE, 1911. Vol. XXXVII. 



COlUCIltS. PAGE 

The Society's MSS.— Bradford, &c. (continued) 1 

Knap Hill Camp: By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington 42 

Salisbury in 1455 (Liber Niger) : By the Rev. Edmund Nevill, 

B.A., F.S.A. 66 

Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age Found in Wiltshire, 
WITH a List of all known examples found in the county : 

By the Rev. E. H. Goddard 92 

Notes 159 

Wilts Obituary 163 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 180 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 200 

Wiltshire Illustrations 202 

Wiltshire Portraits 203 

Additions to Museum and Library 205 

Accounts of Society for the Year 1910 208 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Plan of Knap Hill Camp 44 

Section B.— Knap Hill Camp 45 

Section D. — Knap Hill Camp 50 

Section C— Knap Hill Camp 52 

Saxon Sword found at Knap Hill Camp 54 

Section A. — Knap Hill Camp 59 

Objects from Knap Hill 62 

Socketedlooped Spearhead found under turf in a barrow 94 
Small Knife Dagger half melted with heat of funeral 

pile. From barrow at Wilsford 95 

Tanged Dagger of Copper. Roundway 97 

Three Daggers from Mere Down Barrow, Brigmer- 

ston, and Normanton Bush Barrow , .. 98 

Three Daggers from Winterbourne Stoke Barrow, 
Lake Barrow 8, and Row Barrow, nr. South Down 

Farm 99 

Dagger from Wilsford Barrow 16 100 

Dagger C?) in the Stourhead Collection 101 

Three Bronze Celts from Wilsford and Swindon 102 

Socketed Spearhead. Down S.W. of Beckhampton 104 

Razor. Barrow on Roll estone Down 106 

Lancet. Normanton Barrow 155 107 

Small Tanged Chisel. Barrow near Sidbury Hill 108 

Awl in wooden handle. Locality unknown 108 

Four Awls and Pins from Winterbourne Stoke Bar. 
16, l^arrow at Lake, Normanton Barrow 139, and 

]^,arrow on Silk Hill 109 

Two Pius from Everley and Shepherd's Shore 110 

Two Bracelets from 1 >arrow near Lake 1 1 1 

Pironzi! Horns plated with Gold. Normanton 

P>arrow 155 .^ 112 

Prong-shai)e(l imi)lenu^nt from I'arrow at \V^ilsford 113 
Plates 1. — VIL Ikonze and other objt^cls found in 

Wiltshire " lit] 

Marks on Bell at Potteru(> 160 

DEVIZI^S: C H. Woodwako, I, Saim' .Iohn Street. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE 



MULTOEUM MANIBUS GRANDE LEVATUE ONUS." — Ovid. 

June, 1911. 

THE SOCIETY'S MSS.i 

(Continued from Vol. xxxvi., p. 447.) 

Bradford. 

It was foiuid by inquisitions taken after the deaths of Thomas 
Westley (1561) and Leonard Westley (1562) that they were pos- 
sessed of land, &c., in Bradford, more particularly described in the 
inquisition taken after the death of another Thomas Westley (1622) 
as a messuage, garden and 8«. land, held as of the manor of Bradford 
by 17^/. rent and of the clear yearly value of 6s. 8<i. 

To this small property doubtless the following deeds refer. It 
was acquired apparently by William de Wyteclyve in marriage 
with Agnes, his wife, daughter, as it would seem, of Beatrice, 
daughter of William Sulleve. In the abstracts printed in vol. i. of 
the Mafjazine of " Documents found at Kingston House," relating 
to Bradford, there is one (No. 30, p. 285) dated 1371, described as 
a charter by John Solne son and heir of Stephen Solne, of land in 
Bradford. Possibly then the name " Sulleue," or " Sulleve," should 
be read " Sullene," to agree better with the " Solne " of the later 
document, — for of the identity of the names there can be little 
doul)t, or tlint, failing an etymology, " Solene " sounds preferable to 
" Soleve " ; it is •■ u," however, not " n," which seems to be written 
in the documents. 

' N.B. The iiumhors at the top of each deed are for convenience of 
reference in this article, the nuni])ers in italics at the l)ottoni of each ih'cd 
are those l>y which the ^\w(\ is (listinguishod among the Society's MSS. 

VOL. XXX Vll. — -NO. CX\. !•• 



2 The Society s MSS. 

Eobert de Wilmyndon, clerk, grantee in the following charter, 
we have already met with (No. 8 above, vol. xxxvi., p. 444). An 
abstract of this document and of No. 12, below, are appended, 
with some slight variations of readings, as a foot note to p. 280 of 
the article above referred to, on Kingston House and the documents 
found there, in the first volume of the Magazine. 

10. 
Feoflfment by John de Holte, knight, to Robert de Wilmyndon, clerk 
for 100s. which Eobert gave him beforehand, of a messuage with 
curtilage adjacent in Bradeford, which lies between the tenement of 
James Carpenter and the tenement which Reynold Dorilot holds of the 
abbess of Shaftesbury ; also of a site (placiam) with curtilage adjacent 
in the same town, which lies between the tenement of the aforesaid 
Reynold and the tenement of Hugh Potel. Witnesses, Sir John de 
Comerwell, knight, John de Bradeford, John de Hauuill, William de 
Aula, Walter de Cliaudefeld, Stephen de la Slade, John Basset, John 
de Murtlegh, John de Wulvelegh and other. Seal of arms (three lions 
rampant, two and one) with legend s. johannis. de. holte. 

No. 9. 

The field of the above seal is described, in the footnote above 
referred to, as " semee of fleurs de lys." 

Part of the land thus acquired from Sir John de Holte, Robert 
de Wilmyndon proceeded to exchange with Beatrice Sulleve for 
another messuage and curtilage, by the bridge, as appears by the 
following document : — 

11. 
Indenture being a feoffment by Beatrice Sulleve to Robert de 
Wylmyndon and to John, her first son, of a messuage with a whole 
curtilage adjacent which lies between the bridge of Bradeford and the 
tenement of Agnes de Wulmyndon, mother of the said Robert, with 
warranty against all men ; for this gift, &c., the said Robert has given 
to her and to John, her first son, a messuage with a curtilage in Bradeford, 
which he had by the gift and grant of Sir John de Holte, kni-jht, and it 
lies between the messuage of James Carpenter and the messu|ige which 
Reynold Dorilot holds of the lady abbess of Shaftesbury, in pure 
exchange for ever. Witnesses, Sir John de Holte, Sir John de Comerwell, 
knights, John de Bradeford, William de la Sale, John de Hauuill, 
Stephen de la Slade, John Basset and other many. 

No. 10. 

The purport of all these grants is obscure. The above records 
apparently a genuine exchange ; but this grant by Beatrice is made 

B 2 



The Society s MSS. 3 

to Eoberb jointly with John her son ; and in the document which 
follows we have Eoberb, presumably after John's death, granting 
the messuage by the bridge back to Agnes, Beatrice's daughter, in 
tail, with ultimate remainder to Beatrice's right heirs, reserving, 
however, to himself a rent for life of 6s. Sd., which must have 
represented the full value of the premises ; and we are left in doubt 
whether, after all, his position was fiduciary throughout, or not. 

12. 

Feoffment by Ptobert de Wilmyndon, clerk, to Agnes daughter of 
Beatrice, daughter of William Sulleve of a messuage at the head of the 
bridge of Bradeford together with the whole curtilage adjacent, and 
extending from the said bridge to the wall of his new chamber of the 
burgage (nove camfreniee de burgagio) which formerly was of Robert de 
Wylmyndon his father ; to hold to the said Agnes and the heirs of her 
body begotten, of the chief lords of that fee by the services which belong 
to that messuage, and by rendering therefore yearly to him for his whole 
life 6s. 8J., half at Easter and half at Michaelmas ; if she die without 
heir of her body, then after her decease the messuage shall remain to 
the said Beatrice and the heirs of her body begotten, to hold of the 
chief lords, and by the rent to him, as above ; and if it happen the said 
Beatrice to die without heir of her body begotten, then after her decease 
the said messuage shall remain to the right heirs of the said Beatrice, 
*fec. Witnesses, Sir John de Holte, knt., William de la sale, John 
Basset, Gilbert le feuere, Nicholas le teynturer and many other. 

No. 11. 

West Ashton. 

We assumed above that inasmuch as Beatrice gave the messuage 
by the bridge to Eobert de Wilmyndon jointly with John her son, 
Eobert could not have granted it back to her daughter until by 
John's death he had ])ecome solely seised of it. But it is equally 
possible that John, by a document now lost, had released liis right 
to Eobert, or even that he separately enfeoffed his sister by a 
document not now in the collection. There is a suggestion, at any 
rate, from the charters which follow, that -Tohn was alive at a much 
later date, and there is a clue in them to his identity. We have, 
to begin with, Walter de Wike granting to Eobert de Wilmyndon 
clerk, John son of lieatrice Soleve and Agnes, John's sister, two 
acres of land in West Ashton, and by a further charter granting 
to Eobert de Wilmyndon, clerk, John de Wilmyndon, and Williau) 



4 The Society's MSS. 

de Wyfceclyve and Agnes, his wife, one acre and the reversion of 
five acres in the same place, in each case to hold to them and the 
heirs of Agnes' body with remainder in default to Eobert's right 
heirs. ]N"ow it is impossible to doubt that we have here the 
same three persons in both grants differently described, that is to 
say John first described as son of Beatrice Soleve and secondly as 
John de Wilmyndon, and Agnes first described as sister of John 
and secondly as wife of William de Wytecly ve ; and it further 
becomes reasonable to suppose that Eobert was uncle ex parte 
paterna of John and Agnes. Lastly, it would appear that John is 
identical with John de Wilmyndon, who executed a release (No. Vj 
below) and was, like Robert his uncle, a clerk in holy orders. 

13. 

Feoffment by Walter de Wike to Robert de Wilmyndon, clerk, and 
to John son of Beatrice Soleve, and to Agnes his sister, for a certain 
sum beforehand, of 2a. land in West Ashton, whereof one half -acre lies 
in the north field in a tilth {quadam cultura) which is called Forhclif 
between land of William le Palmere and land of Thomas le Pik, and 
one half-acre lies in the sam-e field at La Smytheswelle and lies in 
length next the land of William Saymour, and one half -acre lies at 
Shorteforlonges in length between the wood of the lady abbess of 
Romeseye and land of the said Robert, and one half -acre lies in the 
south field upon {super) Bolenham, and lies between the land of Henry 
Tyny and the land of Thomas le Pik ; to hold to them and the heirs of 
Agnes of her body begotten, of the chief lords of that fee by the services 
which belong to that land ; warranty to them and the heirs of Agnes ; 
and if the said Agnes die without heir of her body begotten, then after 
the decease of the said Robert, John and Agnes, the said land shall 
remain to the right heirs of the said Robert.- Witnesses, William de 
Testwode, Richard de Boys (Bosco), Thomas -de Langeford, Thomas 
Vincent, William le Jeovene and other many. ^Endorsed Aishton. 

No. 12. 
14. 

Feofi"ment by Walter de Wike to Sir Robert de Wilmyndon, clerk, 
John de Wilmyndon, William de Wyteclyve and Agnes his wife, of la. 
land in the fields of West Ashton, whereof Ja. lies in the north field 
next Kydewelgarston and the land of William Saymor, and the other 
^a. in the east field in the tilth {cultura) which is called Cranhulle and 
it lies next the land of John le Kentithe ; to hold to them and the heirs 
of Agnes of her body begotten, of the chief lords of that fee by the 
services which to that land belong ; also grant that 

2§a. land in the fields of West Ashton and Stepel Ashton, whereof 
la. lies in the east field in " la Witelond " between lands of Sir Robert 



The Society's MSS. 5 

de Wilmyndon and Thomas de Langeford and ^a. lies in "la 
Tounfeilde " in the tilth which is called Clansticche between land of 
Thomas Vyncent and William Saymor, and \a. in the north field and 
it lies in the tilth which is called Alvenelonde between land of 
Piichard de Boys ( Bosco) and William le Saymor, and \a. in the same 
field and it lies at Tutteleswelle between land of William Testvvodeand 
William Palmere* which land Eoger Testwode holds for the term of 
his life ; and also that 

la. in the fields of West Ashton, whereof \a. lies in Tounfeilde at 
^' la Blakelonde " and it lies between land of Sibilla Saucer and John 
Willyng, and \a. in the north field at Horslonde, between land of 
William Testwode and Thomas Pik ; which Henry Tyny holds for the 
term of his life ; and also that 

la. in the fields of the aforesaid town, whereof \a. lies in the east 
field in the tilth which is called Cranhulle, next land of William le 
Jeovene, and the other \a. in Tounfeilde, and it lies in " la Heghesonde 
between land of William le Tlieyn and Thomas le Pik ; which Sibella 
daughter of Pvichard Rodeman holds for the term of her life ; and also 
that 

\a. in the north field at Forclif between land of John Wolf and 
William Saymor ; which Christina Avho was the wife of William le 
Wilde holds for term of life ; by his demise in the said fields the day 
on which this charter was made, and which after the decease of the 
said Ptoger, Henry, Sibilla, Christina ought to revert to him and his 
heirs, after their decease may remain to the said Robert, John, William, 
and Agnes, and the heirs of Agnes ; warranty to them and the heirs of 
Agnes against all men ; and if it happen the said Agnes to die without 
heir of her body begotten, then after the decease of the said Robert 
John, William and Agnes, all the said land shall remain to the right 
heirs of the said Robert, &c. Witnesses, Thomas de Langeford, Richard 
de P>oys ( Bosco) ^ Walter his son, John Oysel, Thomas Bitheclyve and 
many other. Seal e faced. 

No. 13. 

WY'rEGLiYE and Little Wyteclive. 

From this i)oint on the documents are dated. By the two which 
come next William de Wyteclive makes provision for his wife 
Agnes f(n" life in Wyteclive. 

L5. 

Sundav, Feoffment by William de Wyteclive to Sir Robert de 

19 Sept., Wilmyndon, clerk, and Ednuind de Lee of all the lands 

1333. and tenements which he had by the gift and grant of 

Agnes who was the wife of John de ^'ernun in Wyteclyve, 

with ii new dovecot, to wit whatever she had in dower ; also of 40t. 

land in the same town, of wliich 17a. lie in the field which is called 

Westiield, and :^a . lie in the tilth (cnltura) which is called West hange- 

lonil, and \'t. in tlir iilth wliich is vdWrA IN'cfni-lan,--, and L^/. in the 



6 The Societijs MSS. 

tilth which is called Netherwoghelond, and la. in the tilth which is 
called Overwoghelond, and 5a. in the tilth which is called Stitchel keys 
furlong, and 9a. in the field which is called Estfeld, and 2a. in a certain 
croft beside the way, and 2a. in the tilth which is called Ellene, and 
5a. in the tilth which is called Jurdan, and 10a. lie in the tilth which is 
called Wodecumbe, and la. in the tilth which is called Westlangelond, 
and 3a. in the tilth which is called Wytheclyve next the land which 
some time was Agnes de Vernon's which is called Bottes ; and of 4a. in 
Little Wyteclive, whereof 2a. lie in the tilth which is called Fouracres,, 
and Ija. lie in Thornfurlong, and Ja. lies in the tilth which is called 
Cecehacre ; and also of all the meadow which is called Westmede, and 
all his wood which is called Ywecumbe, and also the moiety of his 
whole pasture everywhere for all beasts ; warranty against all men. 
Witnesses, Kobert le Boor, Simon de Wyly, John de Ijangef ord, William^ 
Munt, William Maynard and other many. Dated at Whyteclive,, 
Sunday before S. Matthew the Apostle, 7 Edward III. Seal {lamh and 
flag) with legend pkivesv. 

No. U. 

16. 

Sunday, Feoffment by Robert de Wylmyndon, clerk, and Edmund 

5 Feb., de Lee to William de Wyteclyve and Agnes his wife of all 

1333-4. the lands and tenements which Agnes, who was the wife of 

John de Vernon, formerly held in Wyteclyve in dower, with 

a new dovecot ; also of 40a. land lying in the fields of the town aforesaid, 

as more fully contained in a certain charter thereof made to them by 

the said William ; also of all the meadow which is called Westmede,. 

and of all the wood which is called Ywecombe, and also of the whole 

pasture which they had by the gift of the said William for all beasts ;, 

to hold to the said William and Agnes and the heirs of William of the 

chief lords of the fee by the services which belong to those tenements.. 

Witnesses, Robert le Boer, John de Langeford, William de Montemulle, 

John Monte, John Michel and other. Dated at Wyteclyve, Sunday 

after the Purification, 8 Edward IIL 

No. 15. 

West Ashton and La Stone. 

It appears that, by some document not in the collection, Robert 
de Wilmyndon enfeoffed William de Wyteclyve and Agnes his- 
wife of lands in West Ashton, and that John de Wilmyndon 
either as heir to Robert or jointly enfeoffed with him, subsequently 
released his right therein to William and Agnes, as follows. 

17. 

Sunday, 2 Nov. Release by John de Wylmyndon, clerk, to WiUiam' 

1337. de Wyteclyve and Agnes his wife and their heirs. 

of his right in all the lands and tenements which 

they had by the gift and grant of Sir Robert de Wylmyndon in West 



The Society s MSS. T 

Asliton and la Stone, warranty against all men. Witnesses, Thomas 
de Langeford, Peter de Testewode, Henry de Opton, John le Palmer,. 
Thomas Bitheclyve and other. Dated at Stupel Ashton, Sunday the 
feast of Souls, 1 1 Edward III. 

No. 16. 

William de Whibeclyve was living in the following year when 
he occurs as witness to a release by John, brother and heir of 
Robert le Boor, dated 4 March, 1337-8 (Tropenell Cartulary, ii., 
p. 113) of his right in lands in Hill Deverell, Deverell Langbridge, 
Maiden Bradley and Codford. Kobert de Whiteclyve, his father 
presumably, occurs (ibid. p. 134) as witness to a release, undated, 
by Ellis de Hill to the said Kobert le Boor of his right in land in 
Hill Deverell, &c. The name does nob occur elsewhere in this 
Cartulary. From 1338 onwards we have no further mention of 
the name till 1358, when we reach our next document and find 
Agnes de Whyteclive a widow. 

18. 
Saturday, 29 Be it known that I, Henry Esturmy, lord of Fygheldene,. 
Sept., 1358. have received from Agnes who was the wife of William 
Whyteclive, from Robert Morsel, of Hynmdon, and 
from Thomas Warde, of Durrynton, 10 marks in part of payment of 
40^ in which they were bound to me, as in a certain writing obligatory 
to me by them thereof made more fully appears. Dated at Fygheldene, 
Saturday, the feast ol St. Michael, 32 Edward III. Seal of arms, 
chipi^ed, three demi-lions ; in compartment at top a hugle-horn ; at 
sides, among scroll-ivork, 2J0ssibly arms, of ermine two bars. 

No. 17. 

The interpretation of the above document would nob be at all 
easy if we were limited to the documents in this collection, for 
there is nowhere among them any further mention of Henry 
Esturmy, or Sburmy, to whom the payment was to be made. It 
happens, however, that more than two liundred years later when 
all the various properties we are concerned with had come to the 
hands of a family of Westley, upon the occasion of the death of 
three several members of that family, it was found by iiu|uisitions, 
happily preserved, that the manor of Great Whiteclive was held 
of the heirs of Henry Sturmy. 

With this chie, we can hardly go wrong in supposing that tlie 



S The Society's MSS. 

a,bove acquittance was given by Henry Sturmy to the executors 
of William Whyteclive, namely his widow and very possibly his 
sons-in-law, for part payment of the relief due to him on 
William's death, though on what basis the actual sum was 
assessed, or agreed, it would be difficult to determine. 

It is all the more fortunate that the tenure of Great Whiteclive 
is stated in the inquisitions above referred to, inasmuch as the 
only entry relating to the place printed in " Feudal Aids " (vol. v., p. 
259) neither explains, nor is explained by any of our documents. The 
jurors for the Hundred of " Heghtresbury " found by inquisition 
taken at " Wermystre," Thursday after St. Barnabas, 6 Henry 
VI (17 June, 1428) that " the heirs of William Bussell hold 
immediately in Whiteclyve of the heirs of Henry de Huse certain 
lands and tenements which lately were of William Bussell by the 
fifth part of a knight's fee." The " lately " refers back to the Aid 
of 1346, the returns for which in the case of Wiltshire are most 
unfortunately lost. There was an inquisition taken in 1402, in 
respect of the " Aid " for marrying the king's daughter Blanche, 
for the hundreds of " Heyghtresbury," &c. {ihid., p. 224), the list 
■of the jurors being headed by " William Lyveden," the lord of 
Whiteclive, as we shall see, but of Whiteclive itself there is no 
mention in this return. 

In 1346, the date of the missing return, we have every reason 
for believing that William Whyteclive was lord of Great Whyte- 
clive, and, judging by the inquisitions after the deaths of the 
Westleys, that he held it by service of a quarter of a knight's fee. 
What William Bussell held in Whiteclyve at that date, according 
to " Feudal Aids," by service of a fifth of a knight's fee, does not 
appear. Possibly it was a manor of Little Whiteclive, within 
which some few acres were held by the family of Whiteclyve and 
later on by the Westleys, who held them of John Turbutt, or 
Turebut, gentleman. 

To go back to the acquittance, it is quite certain that one of 
William Whyteclive's heirs was his daughter Margaret. That is 
proved by a subsequent document. It is almost certain from 
another that Lettice, the wife of Thomas Warde, was a second 



The Society s MSS, 9 

daughter and coheir, and Thomas Warde is one of the persons to 
whom Henry Sturmy gives his receipt. A third coheir was perhaps 
the wife of EobertMorsel, otherwise Eobert Mussell, of Hinclon, also 
mentioned in the acquittance ; and it is permissible to conjecture 
that in right of Agnes, his wife — called Agnesafterhergrandmother, 
Agnes (de Wilmyndon) — niece of the above-mentioned Margaret 
Why teclive, and daughter either of Thomas and Lettice Warde, or of 
Kobert Mussell — or possibly daughter of yet another coheir — one 
William Lyveden became possessed of a third, or some other 
fraction of the scattered inheritance of William de Whiteclyve. 
What is certain, is that the family of Whiteclyve was followed, at 
Whitecliff and elsewhere, and at such interval of time as suggests 
^n intervening generation, by a family of Lyveden, of whom the 
first mentioned is William Lyveden, whose wife was Agnes. 

19. 

12 May Letters patent, 12 May, 9 Richard II., being pardon of out- 

1386. lawry for William Lyveden, outlawed in the county of 

Dorset for a debt of 20 marks at the suit of William Wode- 

hay ; the said William Lyvedon having surrendered himself to the 

prison of the Flete, as certified by Robert Bealknap, chief justice of the 

Bench. 

Endorsed. It is enrolled in Easter Term in the eighth year, roll 37. 
No. 18. Cf. Patent Roll Cat. under date, 
" Lyneden." 

Whitecliff, West Ashton, Bradford. 

Such is the not very promising entry of William Lyveden on 
the scene. Whatever the trouble was about it seems to have been 
satisfactorily arranged, and in our next document we find William 
and Agnes his wife, accpiiring from a daughter of AVilliam de 
AVhyteclyve, an aunt of Agnes, as we i)resume, her share of her 
falJier, William's, inheritance in Whitecliff, Steeple Ashton, and 
lUadford, in exchange for an annuity of 166'. for life. 

20. 
^Monday, ( 'hir(),L;rai)li indruted Ix-iiig a fcotVmcnt l)y Mar^'an't, 
23 July, (laui^litcr of William W'hytoclyvi', to William hyvi'done 
138(). and A.uncs his wife, their heirs and assigns, of tlie whole 

piirpartN of all licr lands and tenements together with 



10 The Society's MSS. 

meadows, leasowes (pascuis) and pastures, rents and services, rever- 
sions with their appurtenances in Great and Ijittle Whyteclyve, 
Westasshtone and Bradeford ; rendering therefore yearly to her and 
her assigns 16s. at the four usual terms of the year during her life ;. 
warranty against all people. Witnesses, Roger Stourtone, John Test- 
wode, John Westbury, John Style, William Boket and other. Dated 
at Whyteclyve aforesaid, Monday before St. James, the Apostle, 10' 
Bichard II. Seal^ possibly of arms. 

Fo. 19. 



DURRINGTON, AmESBURY, WhITECLIFF, WeST ASHTON, &C. 

Meanwhile a further fraction of the Whiteclive inheritance 
continued in the possession of Lettice, late the wife of Thomas^ 
Warde, who, by the document which follows, gives to her son, 
John Warde, in exchange for a rent and food and clothing for 
life, her purparty in the places with which we have become so 
familiar, Great and Little Whiteclive, Saucers Ashton, e^c. It 
will be noticed that if Agnes Lyveden was a daughter of this 
Lettice, she had not, at this date, become entitled to any part of 
the inheritance as Lettice's heir. 

21. 

Friday, This indenture witnesseth that Lettice {Leticia) Warde 

25 March, has demised to John Warde, her son, all the lands and 

1390. tenements, rents and services, meadows, pastures, with all 

other their appurtenances which she had the day of 

making of the presents in the towns and fields of Duryngton and Great 

Ambresbury by virtue of a joint feoffment with Thomas Warde 

sometime her husband ; to hold to the said John for the term of her 

life, rendering therefore yearly to her and her assigns for the term of her 

life a rose at Midsummer and doing to the chief lords of that fee the 

rents and services which belong. 

The aforesaid Lettice has also demised and granted to the aforesaid 
John all her lands and tenements with their appurtenances which ta 
her purparty by force of sharing (participacionis) by lot and inheritance 
descended, or which in form aforesaid hereafter may descend, in the 
towns and fields of Whyteclyve, Wylyisfeyld, West Haston, Saucers 
Haston and Bradeford or elsewhere ; to hold for term of Ufe, rendering 
therefore yearly 32s. at the four terms of the year usual by equal 
portions ; if the said rent is in arrear by fifteen days after any term 
she may enter on the said lands and tenements, distrain, or if she prefer 
seize and keep ; and the aforesaid John Warde the aforesaid Lettice 
for the term of her life competently shall find, as in victual and clothing^ 



Pedigree (No. I.) to illustrate succession of owners of manor of Great Whitecliff. 



Philip de Whiteclive [born about 1230].= 
Attends court of the abbot of Glas- i 
tonbury for Longbridge Deverell, 3 : 
Edward I. (1275). [Hundred EoUs.] : 

~ ""~r 

William de Whiteclive [born about= 
1260]. Grantee from Belefille I 
(No. 1). Enfeoffed Eobert hi,s 
son (No. 2). I 



Eobert de Whyteclive [born about= 
1285]. Grantee from father (No. 
2). Grantee from Eobert de 
Wilmyndon, 5 Nov., 1321 (No. 8). 



Eobert de Whiteclive [born about 1255]. 
On jury of proof of age of Thomas 
Maudut, of .Warminster, 17 Nov., 9 
Edw. II. (1315), aged 60. 



Eobert de Wil-= Agnes 

myndon, of ] (No. 11). 

Bradford 

(No. 12), 



Beatrice, daughter of= [de 



William Sulleve 
(Nos. 11 and 12). 



Wilmyn- 
don.] 



Eobert de Wilmyndon, 
clerk (Nos. 8—16). 
Living 1334. 



William de Whiteclive [born about 1310].=Agnes (Nos. 12, 13, 14, 16) ; 
Grantee, with wife Agnes, from Eobert i widow in 1358 (No. 18). 
de Wilmyndon, 1334 (No. 16). Occurs 
1338 ; dead 1358. 



John, son of Beatrice [otherwise John de 
Wilmyndon, otherwise J. de W., clerk]. 
(Nos. 11, 13, 14. Living 1337 (No. 17). 



Margaret [born about 1335]. Thomas Warde, of Durring-=Lettice. Gave Eobt. Mnsselli= 
Gave her purparty to W. ton. Living 1358 (No. 18) ; I herpurparty of Hindon. | 



and Agnes Lyveden, 1386. dead 1390 (No. 21). 



John Warde. = 
Grantee from 
mother, 1390. 



William Lyveden [born=Agnes 



about 1360]. Grantee 
from Margaret White- 
clive, 1386 (No. 20). 
Living 1405 (No. 22) ; 
dead 1432 (No. 23). 



Living 



Eobert Lyveden [born about 1390].= Alice Wodeforde, 
Living 1432 and 1440 (Nos. 23 1 living 1432 (No. 
and 24) ; dead 1445 (No. 25). 23.) 

~r 

John Lyveden, esq. [born about=Avice 

1420]. Occurs 1446, 1464 (Nos. | Settlement 
25 and 26). Settled estate on onher,1466 
daughter, 1476 (No. 29). Had (No. 29). 
Jubilee indulgence, 1477. Living 

1477. 



Nicholas Seyntlo, second=Margaret, 
son of Sir Nicholas. sole 
marriage settlement, daugh- 
1476 (No. 29). terand 

heir. 



The Society s MSS. 11 

according to the need of her estate {exigenciam status sui); and further 
in case the said John die in her lifetime, all the aforesaid lands and 
tenements are to remain to the aforesaid Lettice for the term of her 
life by the rents and services which to them belong ; in witness whereof 
the parties aforesaid to the parts of that indenture have put to their 
seals. Witnesses, Nicholas Wodhull, William Upton, John Madyngton, 
Robert Elisaundre and other. Dated at Duryngton, Friday, the feast 
of the Annunciation, 13 Ilichard II. 

No. 20. 



The presence of the above indenture in the collection may be 
taken as proof that by purchase or descent William Lyveden, or 
his son, acquired the interest in Whitecliff and elsewhere of the 
family of Warde, and handed on the whole to their successors in 
title. 

The accompanying pedigree is a conjectural arrangement, in. 
accordance with the suggestions made above, of the persons men- 
tioned in the foregoing documents. 

In the family antiquities of Gloucester and Somerset, and in a 
less degree, of Wilts, the influence of Bristol is always present. 
There the younger sons are apprenticed, and thence return, to 
invest the proceeds of trade in land. Thus we find, according 
to Collinson {vol. ii., pp. 296 — 7) Eoger Lyveden, of Bristol, 
and Isabel, his wife (dowered 1450) buying the manor of 
Ashton Philips, in Long Ashton, between 1421 and 1425, which 
passed to their daughters and coheirs, Jane Wynibissli and Agnes 
Wythiford. Slightly earlier John Lyveden occurs as party to a 
tine whereby the manor of Claverham, with lands in Claverham 
and YaLton, was settled on Henry and Alice Vyell and the heirs 
of Alice. Perhaps, tlien, it was from Bristol that William Lyveden 
came to settle at Whiteclive, though our first notice of him was 
(No. 19) as outlawed in the county of Dorset. At Whiteclive at 
any rate he setlliMl down. In 16 Richard [[. he witnesses a 
charier {Tropfurll C<irt., ii., 116) dated at Hill Deverell, 4 ]\Iarclk 
(L)92 — .")) — " these l)eing witnesses, Stephen liodenham, IJoger 
Stui-ton, William Lyvedon, clohn Babyington, John Towke and 
other." Our last iH)Li(M^ of him is as [)etty collector of a subsidy 
for his own hamlet. 



12 The Society s MSS. 

Whitecliff. 

22. 
Sat^ 3 Receipt by John Megere, collector of the king's moneys, 
January, for a purparty of a fifteenth in the county of Wilts, the 
1404 — 5. day of date, from William Lyveden, collector of the ham- 
let (villaf) of Witclyve, of 6s. 8d. Weremynstre, Satur- 
day, before the Epiphany, 6 Henry lY. 

No. 21. 

Salisbury. 

"William Lyveden was presumably dead in 1432, when Eobert 
Lyveden, doubtless liis son, is described as of Brixton Deverill, 
in wliicb parish of course Whitecliff was situate. 

23. 

4 Nov. Grant by Agnes Langestoke, widow, of the town of Suth- 
1432. ampton, daughter and heir of William Sexhampcote, late 
" dyer " of the city of Salisbury, to Alice (Alesie) Wodeiovd, 
wife of Robert Lyveden, of Brygheston Deverell, co. Wilts, her cousin . 
(cognate mee) and the heirs of Alice's body, of 4s. rent which William 
her father purchased of William de Bruyton, citizen of the said city, 
and of Agnes his wife, coming yearly from the tenement late of John 
Payvot which was formerly Roger atte Welle's, and which Simon Poye, 
mercer of the city aforesaid, now holds, situate in the city aforesaid in 
the high street {alto vico) called " Endelesestret," between the tenement 
late of the said John Payvot on the north and the tenement which was 
Roger le Plomer's on the south. Witnesses :— Walter Fetplace, mayor 
of Suthampton, Ralph Chaumberleyn and Robert Hevyngham, bailiffs, 
Robert Geffrey, steward of the same, John Estwell, William Nicoll, 
George Usk, and many other. Suthampton, 4 November, 11 Henry 
VI. Seal {apparently merchants' mark). 

No. 22. 

Whitecliff. 
The feoffment which follows may have been to the use of Robert's 
will. 

24. 

Saturday, Grant by Robert Lyveden to John Janet and John Grene, 

21 May, clerks, of all his land, &c., in Great {Magna) Whitclyf 

1440. and Little {Parva) ; warranty by Robert and his heirs 

against all men. Witnesses, John Westebury, Roger 

Pyriton, Robert Bodenham. William Gyfforde, Thomas Goion, and 

other. Witclif aforesaid, Saturday the eve of the Holy Trinity, 18 

Henry VI. 

No. 23. 



The Society s MSS. 13 

There are three mentions of Kobert Lyveclen, or Leveden, in 
vol. I. of the Tropenell Cartulary (pp. 237 — 8, 240) the two first 
in the will of Eobert Warmwell, of Salisbury, who directs the sale 
by his executors of his tenement in " Scotteslane," of the said city, 
between the tenement of Kobert Lyveden on the east and the 
tenement of Joan Shirley on the west, also the sale of 5s. rent 
arising from the said tenement of Eobert Lyveden. The date of 
the will is 20 April, 1447. One of Warmwell's executors wa& 
John Wyly, who, 3 December, 1455, enfeoffs William Swayn, 
citizen of Salisbury, and Robert Sawser, " gentilman," of inter alia 
the tenement in " Scotterlane " between the tenement of Eobert 
Leveden, &c., and the 5s. rent from the said tenement of Eobert 
Leveden. On neither occasion is the tenement described as "late 
of Eobert Lyveden " ; but it is probable that Eobert was dead in 
1445 when John Lyveden, presumably his son, is found dealing 
(No. 25) with the property in Steeple Ash ton, &c., and he was 
certainly dead in 1464 when John enfeoffs (No. 26) the rector of 
Kingston Deverell and another of two cottages in " Scotteslane." 

West Ashton, Eodshaw, Bradford. 

25. 

18 March, Grant by John Lyveden to William Besyle, Walter Bayly,. 

1444-5. clerk, and Robert Symmys, of all his land, vfec, in West- 

haston, Rodeshawe and Bradeford ; warranty by liim and 

his heirs. Witnesses, Robert Hungerford, knight, John Sturton, knight, 

Richard Milbourne, Roger Piryton, Robert Bodenham, and many other. 

Brygh[t]eston Deverell, Thursday after St. Gregory the Pope, 23 

Henry VI. 

No. 24. 

There are many references to John Lyveden in the pages of the 
" Tropcncll Cartulary " ; in all cases, from 1453 to 1476, he is 
qualified as " esquire." There is in particular an interesting 
deposition ])y him of what liappened on " IMonday after the Nativity 
of Our Lady in the harvest" (Vol. ii., pp. 42—46), 1453. There 
is mention of his "signet" (p. 46), and (p. 81) of a deed certified 
uniler his soah He mentions (p. 47) that Richard Tago, oi War- 
minster, was with liim "at lU'ighston I)e\'(Moll in niyii dwiie hoiis." 



14 The Society's MSS. 

He was also possessed, as appears by the set of documents im- 
mediately following, of a "capital mansion" at Durrington, where 
the family of Warde (see above) had in all probability preceded him. 

Whitecliff, Salisbury, Amesbury, Durrington. 

The following set of deeds (Nos. 26 — 28), by which he gives the 
bulk of his property to Alice, his wife, for the term of his life, may 
liave been executed on the occasion of his marriage with her. In 
this case it was probably a second marriage, if, as seems likely, he 
was born not later than 1420. Otherwise we may presume that 
the settlement was made with the view to the protection of his 
estate in troublesome times. 

26. 

23 June, Feoffment by John Ly veden, of Great Whytclyf ( Whytdyf 
1464. magna) esq., to Master Robert Wedenham, then rector 

of the parish church of Kyngeston Deverell, and Richard 
Sliothull, of his manor of Great Whytclyf with lands, &c., a toft with 
12(2. arable in Little Whytclyf {Whytclyf parva) two messuages with 
their curtilages and with all meadows, feedings and pastures to the 
.same belonging, two cottages in the city of Salisbury in a certain lane 
there commonly called " Scotteslane," and two cottages with a meadow 
and 3(%. arable in Great Ambresbury {Amhreshury magna), also his 
capital mansion with a cottage and six virgates of arable with meadows, 
feedings and pastures in Duryngton ; warranty for himself and his 
heirs against all men. Witnesses, William Ludlowe, Alexander Stan- 
tor, Robert Osebourne, John Ludelowe, Robert Burlegh and other. 
Dated at Great Whytclyf, 23 June, 4 Edward IV. 

No. 25. 

27. 

24 June, Feoffment by Master Robert Wedenham, then rector of 
1464. the parish church of Kyngeston Deverell and Richard 

Shothull to Avice {Avesie) wife of John Ly veden, of Great 
W^hytclyf, of the manor of Great Whytclyf, a toft with 12a. arable in 
in Little Whytclyf, two messuages with curtilages and all meadows, 
(fcc, two cottages in Salisbury in "Scotteslane," two cottages with 
a meadow and 3a. arable in Great Ambresbury, and a capital mansion 
with a cottage and six virgates arable with meadow, &c., in Duryngton, 
which they had by the gift and feoffment of the said John Lyveden ; 
to hold for the term of her life, with remainder to the right heirs of 
John Lyveden aforesaid and their assigns ; warranty for her life against 
all men. Witnesses, John Uffenham, John Basset, William Wyther, 
John Danyell, the elder, and many other. Dated at Great Whytclyf, 
24 June, 4 Edward IV. 

No. 26. 



The Society's MSS. 15 

28. 
5 July, Release by same to same of same. Witnesses, John Wylby, 
1464. knight, John Mummepesson,Philip Morgan,Peter atte Yate, 
and many other. Great Whytclyf, 5 July, 4 Edward IV. 
Seals (1) a double-headed eagle displayed, (2) "R." 

No. 27. 

KODSHAW, BrADFOIID. 

Twelve years later John Lyveden married off his only child, 
supposing that the following agreement took effect. The lands in 
West Ashton and Bradford were not included in the gift of 1464 
to his wife, and these accordingly, with the promise of the reversion 
of everything else inherited from his father in Wiltshire, are what 
he gives his daughter. 

29. 
2 Aug., "This Indenture made at Brigeston Deverell," co. Wilts, 
1476. 2 August, 16 Edward IV., between Nicholas Seyntlo, of 
Knyghtes Sutton, co. Somerset, " knyghte," of the one 
part, and John Lyveden, of Brigeston Deverell, " foresaide, esquyer," 
of the other, witnesseth that " where certeyn communicacioun hath be 
had and moved bitwene the parties aforesaide for tretise of mariage 
bitweene Nicholas the seconde sone of the foresaide S'. Nicholas and 
Margarete Lyveden doughter and heire to the foreseide John Lyveden," 
the said Nicholas and John " bith agreed " as follows. Nicholas and 
Margaret to take one another to wife and husband before " Whitsonday 
next." S'. Nicholas to enfeoff Nicholas and Margaret of 10 marks of 
lands and tenements in Phipayne Gary, co. Somerset, to them and the 
heirs of Nicholas of Margaret's body begotten, with remainder to the 
right heirs of S^ Nicholas ; and S'. Nicholas shall enfeoff the said 
Nicholas his son of 10 marks of lands and tenements in Newmanstrete 
and Dircot, to him and his heirs for ever within four years next. The 
said John Lyveden on his part shall enfeoff the said Nicholas and 
Margaret before the day of marriage of lands, &c., of the yearly value 
of 6 marks in West Assheton called Rodshawe, and in Bradforde, co. 
W^ilts, to them and the heirs of their bodies with remainder to John's 
right heirs. " And the said John Lyveden slial not make non ahenacioun 
ne discontynuance in fee, terme of lyfe ne of yeres, but shal dye seised 
of alle the londes and tenementes which his fader lefte him with ynne 
the saide countie of Wiltshire," exce])t the said 6 marks in West Asshton 
and Bradforde ; and all the saide lands etc., shall descend to the said 
Margaret Lyveden, his daughter and heir after his decease im- 
mediately. Whereas S'. Nicholas is bound to John in 200 marks "at 
the fcste of Missomer nexte," the date of which obligation is 2 Aug., 
16 Edward IV, the same to be void on performance of above covenants, 
and similarly John's obligation to S'. Nicholas in 200 marks of same 
date, etc. 

No. 28. 



16 The Society's MSS. 

In the following year Jolin Lyvedeu passes out of our sight, 
appropriately enough after the grant to him of a papal indulgence. 

30. 
3 April, 1477. Certificate by John, abbot of Abendon, papal collector, 
&c., of a Jubilee indulgence granted to John Lyveden, 
esquire, and Avice his wife, of the diocese of Salisbury. Salisbury, 3 
April, 1477. 

No. 29. 



Nineteen years later the family of Westley was in residence at 
Brixton Deverel and in possession, as appears by the various 
settlements, &c., which follow, of all those lands in Whitecliff and 
elsewhere previously held by John Lyveden and his predecessors. 
John Westley, the first of them (No. 31) is elsewhere (No. 35) 
described as cousin and heir of Kichard Panys and Alice his wife, 
and was entitled as such to certain tenements in Bristol. As such 
heir it may be that he acquired the Wiltshire property, but there 
is no proof of it in these papers, nor any indication of a connexion 
between Kichard and Alice and the family of Lyveden, whose own 
Bristol origin^ as we have seen, is only a matter of surmise. 

The following document, in which John Westley is mentioned 
for the first time, is one of the most interesting in the collection. 
The endorsement clearly indicates the difficulty of securing the 
services of a priest in parishes so remote. 

31. 
23 March, Bond by John Hewlett, rector of the parish church of 
1495 — 6. Brixston Deverell, co. Wilts, to John Westley [and J 
Peter Stantor, of Bryxston aforesaid, gentlemen, in 40^. 
at Christmas next, conditioned as follows : — 

" The condicion of this obligacion is suche that if so be the within 
wretyn Syr John Hewlett permute or resygne his benyfice within the 
space of iij yere aftyr the dat' within wretyn that then this obligacion 
stand in his strength and effect and if he do not then this obligacon is 
of no valew." 23 March, 11 Henry VII. 

No. 30. 

It seems probable, by the dates which can be recovered of hi& 
descendants, that this John Westley was born about 1450. 
Tropenell in his cartulary inserts a charter, " falsely and fraudu- 
lently made" by Eichard Page, of Warminster, gentleman, ta 



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The Society s MSS. 17 

Richard, duke of York, and other great men, WilUam Stowreton, 
knight, Keynold Stowreton, knight, Thomas Lyte, esquire, Philip 
Morgan, esquire, and Jolni AVesteley, "gentihnan," dated at Cliik- 
lade, 22 August, 28 Henry VI (1460). Thus it appears tliat the 
family of Westley had been settled in Wiltshire, and in the neigh- 
bourhood of Warminster — Brixton Deverell is mid-way between 
Warminster and Chicklade — for at any rate a generation before 
the John Westley of our record, and that his father, perhaps, was 
<|ualified, in 1460, as "gentilman." 

hi the same year that the above bond (ISro. 31) was given, 
John Westley's eldest daughter was married to the son of a 
neighbouring squire. She married him as his second wife, and 
provision is made in her post-nuptial settlement against the 
possible unkindness of her stepson. The accompanying pedigree 
explains tlie relationship; it is based on two inquisitions ^90s^ 
viurUm, the references to which are C. Series II., Vol 18 (1), and 

E. Series II., file 896 (16). 

32. 

28 Dec, Indenture 28 December, 12 Henry VII., between John 
1496. Westeley, of Berston Deverell, co. Wilts, gent., of the one 
part, and"PetreStantor, late of Farley," co. Somerset, son 
and lieir apparent of Alexander Stantor, late of Hornyngesliam, co. Wilts , 
of the other, witnessing that whereas "upon certen promysesandcove- 
nauntes " by both parties, " the same Petre hath take to wif Alice oldest 
doughter of the said John Westeley," for the performance of which 
promises the said John is bound to the said Peter in 200^., the said Peter 
grants that within half a year of the decease of Alexander, his father, 
he will make estate to the said John and to one John Fulbroke, gent. 
and to such other as the said John " orelles the next cosyn or next of 
])lod to the seid Alice woll name and assigne," of certain lands, ttc, now 
belonging to the said Alexander within the lordship of Hornyngesliam, 
or of other lands of the inheritance of the said Alexander within the 
said county to the value of 10 marks, to hold to them to the use of the 
said Peter and Alice and of the heirs of their bodies, remainder to the 
right heirs of Peter, " u])on condicion that if one John Stantor son and 
lieir api)araunt of the seid I'etre or any other claymyng title or conveiying 
his desciMit 1)y the saiiu; Petre trouble vexe distour])e etc., the seid Alice 
by accion cntri' nv l.y ciiy other maner of the seid londes, etc.," then the 
same frotl'iMS to stand seised thereof to the use of the said Ahce 
and lin- lu irs in Ire, iVc. Witnesses, Sir Walter Hungerford, knight, 
John Lndlow.', -Tnt., -lolm l)art ram antl ot Iht. 

Si<//i((l i»cr i*i:i'ia M Stantok. 

VOL. WWII. — NO. CW. C 



18 The Society's MSS. 

Bkistol. 

The two next documents appear to be fragments of the title 
deeds of a property in Bristol, which, as we learn from I^o. 35, came 
to John Westley as heir of Kichard Panys and Alice his wife. 

33. 

25 Dec, Chirograph indented. This is the agreement made between 
1275. Thomas de Kylmeynan, delivering {tradentem) of the one 
part, and Eichard le Ropere, receiving, of the other part, 
to wit Thomas has granted and delivered to farm to Richard 3s. 6c?. rent 
of assise from a cellar of his under his hall in the suburb of Bristoll in 
the street from {sicut itur de) from Frome bridge {])onte Frame) towards 
St. Augustine, from that tenement which is situate between land which 
was of the fee of the abbess of St. Augustine on one side and land which 
was of Giles de Berneleby on the other ; to have and hold from Christmas^ 
1275, for five years, quarterly ; warranty ; to revert to Thomas after 
the said term. Witnesses, John de Lydiard, mayor of Bristoll, William 
de la Marina and William de Blakeford, reeves, William Dunning, 
Walter Hobbe, Giles de Berneleby, John de Templo, and other. Steal. 

No. 32. 

34. 

12 Nov., Feoffment by John Borne, "sadeler," and John Seymour,, 
1361. " fishere," burgesses of the town of Bristoll, to John Ropere 
of the said town, ifellow-burgess {comhurg') of all their 
tenement situate in the suburbs of Bristoll in "Knyfsmythstret," be- 
tween the tenement appropriated to the chantry of the church of St. 
Lawrence of the same town on one side and the tenement late of John 
de Colyndon on the other, and it extends itself from the street in front 
to the land of the master and brethren of the house of St. Mark of 
Bristol behind ; which tenement they had by the gift and feoffment of 
the said John Ropere; warranty. Dated, Bristoll, 12 November, 35 
Edward III. Witnesses, Robert Cheddre, then mayor of the town of 
Bristoll, Ellis Spelly and William Somerwell, then bailiffs of the same 
town, John Wotton and Henry Cobyndon, then stewards there, John 
atte Celere, Robert Gratele, Nicholas Gnouusale, Stephen Waleys, John 
Malvern, Robert Charnie, and many other. One seal. 

JSfo. 33. 

35. 

19 Jan., Release by Joan Barton, ilate the wife of Oliver Barton, 

1502-3. daughter of Roger Pigyon and of Joan his wife, and 

Richard Roucester', she in her widowhood, to John 

Westley, cousin and heir of Richard Panys and Alice his wife, and 

the heirs and assigns of John, of their right in three messuages and 

three gardens lying together next the garden {virid') of St. Augustine 

in Bristoll, which the aforesaid Richard Panys lately purchased of 

the executors of John Brampton ; also of their right in a messuage 



The Society's MSS. 19 

with garden at St. Augustine aforesaid wherein Thomas Frencham, 
" cordiner," lately dwelt ; also of their right in all those lands 
and tenements late of the said Ilichard Panys situate in the suburbs 
of BristoU aforesaid, on the quay {kayani) between the lane called 
"Kaye," toward Mershestret on one side and tenements of John 
Borne on the other, and extends itself from the said quay in front to 
the tenement formerly of Richard Deverelle behind. Dated at Shaftes- 
bury, CO. Dorset, 19 January, 18 Henry VII. 

{Signed) per me Ricakdum Rowsetuk. 

No. 34, 

DlTRRINGTON, RODSHAW. 

In 1511, being then a man towards sixty years of age, John 
AVestley settled his property. He levied a fine to William Malliom, 
clerk, and others, of his lands in Durrington and Steeple Ashton 
(No. 36), and suffered a recovery to them (recited in No. 37) of 
his land in Whitecliff, Bradford, Amesbury, "Bores " and Salisbury. 

36. 

9 July, Final concord in the qainzaine of St. John the Baptist, 3 

1511. Henry VIII, between William Malhom, clerk, Richard 

Elyot, sergeant-at-law, Roger Frees and John Sainsbury, 

querents, and John Westley, deforciant, of three messuages, six tofts, 

280a. land, 14a. meadow, 30a. pasture and 2a. wood and common of 

pasture for 400 sheep, in Duryngton and Rodschawe in the parish of 

Steple Ayssheton, to wit John Westley has acknowledged the aforesaid 

tenements and common of pasture to be the right of Roger as those 

which Roger, William, Richard and John Seynesbury have of John 

Westley's gift and released and quitclaimed from him and his heirs to 

Wilham, Richard, Roger and John Seynesbury and the heirs of Roger 

for ever ; and besides the same John Westley granted for him and his 

heirs that they will warrant the premises to them and the heirs of 

Roger ; for this they gave him 100 marks. 

Feet of Fines, Wilts. 

WiriTECLiFF, Bradford, Amesbury, " Bores," Salisbury, 
Durrington, Rodshaw. 

The only new place mentioned in the above list is " Bores" ; of 
property in WhileclilV, &c., we have heard repeatedly. By docu- 
ments which follow it appears that the forty acres or so known as 
" Bores " were liehl as of the manor of Monkton Deverell, and hiy 
in Codford Mary and Monkton Deverell and possibly also, in i);ut, 
in Dcvcroll Langbiiili^e. " Robert le Uuer " occurs as a witness to 

c 2 



20 The Society s MSS. 

ISlo. 16, above, and we have cited a charter from the Tro-penell 

Cartulary, to which William de Whiteclyve was a witiiess,whereby 

John, brother and heir of Eobert le Boor, releases his right to 

lands in the Deverells. Much further information with regard to 

this family of Boor will be found in this invaluable cartulary, and 

it is interesting to discover their name preserved, as a place-name, 

in this collection of Westley title deeds. 

37. 
12 July, Know, &c., that we, William Malhom, clerk, ."Richard 

1511. Eliot, Serjeant at law, Roger Frees and John Seynesbury 

have granted {tradidimus, dimisimMS et hac presenti carta 
nostra indentata conjirmavimus) to John Westley our manor of 
Whitclif, CO. Wilts, also seven messuages, nine tofts, a dovecot, six 
gardens, 180a. land, 26a. meadow, 600a. pasture, 20a. wood and 
common of pasture for two oxen, a horse {affrum) and twenty sheep 
in Great {Magna) Whitclif, Little (Parva) Whitclif, Bradford, Ambres- 
bury. Bores and Salisbury which they recovered by writ of entry " in 
le post " before the judges of the Bench, Trinity Term, 3 Henry VIII. ; 
also we have granted {tradidimus et dimisimus) to the said John three 
messuages, six tofts, 280a. land, 14a. meadow, 30a. pasture and 2a. 
wood, and common of pasture for four hundred sheep in Duryngton 
and Rodshawe in the parish of Steple Assheton, which they had from 
him by fine levied in the said Trinity Term in the year abovesaid ; to 
have and to hold the said manor and other the premises to the said 
John for the term of his life without impeachment of waste, and after 
the decease of the said John Westley the said manor, &c., shall remain 
to Thomas Westley son of the said John Westley and the heirs of his 
body, with remainder in default to Agnes Westley, daughter of John 
W^estley the younger son of the said John Westley and the heirs of 
her body, with remainder in default to Margaret wife of Roger Frees, 
daughter of the said John Westley the elder and the heirs of her body, 
with remainder in default to Avice wife of Thomas Folsham, Ellen 
and Joan daughters of the said John Westley the elder and the heirs 
of their bodies, with remainder in default to the right heirs of John 
Westley the father of the said Thomas ; attorneys to deliver seisin 
John Burgeys, John Bosse and William Style. Dated 12 July, 

Henry VIII. 
Not executed. No. 35. 

38. 

12 July, Counterpart of the above. With the endorsement : — To 

1511. the Right Worshipful and my singuler good Maister Roger 

Frees Dwelling at Hornyngesham be dely verid in al goodly 

hast and in his absence Mrz. his wif. And in bothe theire absences to 

Mr. Ed. Trigge, his clerk, or to somme other of his cler. servauntes to 

delyver over to the said Mr. Frees in al [hast]. 

No. 86. 



The Society s MSS. 21 

39. 
12 July, Indenture in same words as the above and of same date. 
1511. Executed by: — 

per WiLLELMUM Malhom clericum. Seal^ a buck statant. 

Ric' Elyot. Seal, a castle gate. 

Blank. Seal, letter " I " with crown above. 

No. 37. 



MONKTON DeVERELL. 

The following document relates to a leasehold held by the 
Westley family {see No. 45, heloiv). 

40. 
20 March, "This endentur' made betwene John Andrewe of the 
1516 — 17. He of Wight yn the Countie of Hamsher gentilman off 
the one partie and William Powton off the other i^artie 
Witnesseth that the said John Andrewe hath take and to ferme letten 
unto the seid William Powton all his londez meduez and pasturez 
with thappourtenaunces which the seid John hath yn Muncketon 
gretwhitclyf and litle Whitclyff and Borres yn the parysh of Deverell 
Langbrigge yn the Countie off Wiltes, with pastur' for xij oxen and a 
bole witliyn the manour of Muncketon Deverell as the seid John and 
his auncestrey have had and ought to have ther of thabbotand Covent 
of the Monastery of Glastonbury " ; from Michaelmas next for twenty- 
one years, at 20s. rent, tkc. 20 March, 8 Henry VIII. Seal. 

No. 38. 

John Westley died, apparently, in 1521. Inquisitions are in 
existence taken after the deaths of his son, grandson and great 
grandson. On the occasion of his own death a writ was issued to 
hold such an enquiry, but it was never returned, possibly on the 
ground that none of his lands were held in chief, more probably 
on the ground that, by the settlement above (Nos. 36 — 39) set out, 
he had divested himself of his estate. The actual writ, however, 
conLinued in the possession of his descendants. That it was not 
issued in error is apparent, since by documents dated in January 
following (Nos. 42 and 43) we know that he was then dead. 

41. 
14 Oct., Ori^-iiial writ to the esclie;itor, co. Wilts. Wliere;i<( .loliii 
1521. Westley who held of us in chief d/'on. clau^if extrtnumn, 
kc. Westminster, 14 October, 13 Henry [\'lll.]. 

No. 39. 



22 The Society s MSS. 

Beixton Deverell. 
The following release, in accordance with an award, is the first 
we hear of Thomas Westley after his father's death. The mention 
of Bidcombe Hill, the round barrow, the ditch and the pits is 

interesting. 

42. 

12 Jan., To all, &c. William Ludlowe, son and heir of John 

1521-2. Ludlowe, of Hill Deverell, co. Wilts, deceased, &c. Know 

that I the aforesaid William, according to the ordinance 

and award of John Fitz James, serjeant-at-law, and George Twynyhoo, 

esquire, have released for me and my heirs and by these presents have 

quitclaimed to Joan Westley, widow, and Thomas Westley, son and 

heir of John Westley, in their full and peaceful possession being, and 

to the heirs of Thomas, to the use of the said Thomas and his heirs, of 

my right, &c., in a parcel of land containing 16a. lying on the hill 

{super montem), which abuts and lies in length from a ditch called 

*' Matrevers Diche," through a wood (silvam) of the said William 

Ludlowe called " Bitcum Wode," up to a litle hill (montem) called " a 

Bownde Barowe " on the said hill, and abuts in width from the said 

wood to certain pits (puteas) lying on the side of the said hill {in latere 

predicte montis), &c. ; warranty for himself and his heirs against the 

abbot of Westminster and his successors. 

Dated 12 January, 13 Henry YIII. 

Signed per me Willelmtjm Ludlowe. 

Seal. No. 40. 

43. 

12 Jan^, A precisely similar release to same, of same date, by 
1521 — 2. Phelippa Ludlowe, widow, late the wife of John Ludlowe 
of Hill Deverell. 

Signed By me Phyllyppe Ludlowe. Seal. 

"PL" 

No. 41. 

HUNDEEDS OF HeYTESBUEY AND MeEE. 

We have seen (No. 22) William Lyveden as petty collector ; 
here we have the commission of Thomas Westley, a hundred and 
twenty years later, as high collector of a subsidy. The spellings 
are remarkable, " Often " for " Orcheston,'^ " All Hallon '' for "All 
Saints," '^Saylys" for '' Zeals." 

44. 

15 April, This indenture made the xv"* day of Aprilis the xv"' yere 

1524. of Kyng Harry the viij"' witnessith that wee William 

Ludlowe Thomas Gauen and John Morgan commishioners 

to our soveraign lorde the kyng in the com' of Wiltes for the subsid 



The Society s MSS. 23 

graunded att the last parlement for the arrerages of the first yeres 
subsid in the hundred of Heytesbury & Mere have assign k named 
Thomas Westley of Whitteclyffe of the parish of Burston Deverll 
gent' highe collectour to receve of every pety collectour of every 
parishe & town within the seid hundred all such somes of mony as in thes 
presentes be contayned to be payd to our seid soveraign lorde the kyng 
in his Escheker be fore the mouwthe of Ester next commyng 
Hundr' de That is to seie John Saynesbury pety collectour of Haytesbury 
Haytesbury vj.s. The seid John Haynesbury pety collectour of Boyton k 
Gorton — xiij.s. viij.d. Robert Braye pety collectour of Ascheton Gifford 
— ij.s. the seid Robert Bray pety collectour of Knoke — xvj.d. the seid 
Robert Bray petye collectour of Upton Lovell — iiij.s. x.d. Thomas Warde 
pety collectour of Often Gorge k Often Mary — viij.s. The seid Thomas 
Warde pety collectour of Ghetern Mari k Ghetern All Hallon — xxix.s. 
William Wilkyns pety collectour of Bathampton — x.s. viij.d. The seid 
William Wilkyns petye collectour of Ymber — vj.s. x.d. The seid William 
Wilkyns petye collectour of Hull D[e]verell— xvj.d. k the seid William 
Wilkyns petye collectour of Theteryngton — iij.s. viij.d. Peter Stanter 
petye collectour of Hornyngsam Ij.s. x.d. The seid Peter Stanter petye 
collectour of Burston Deverll — iiij.s. vj.d. The seid Peter Stanter petye 
collectour of Est Godford k West Godford — xi.s. 

Summa of the seid Hundred — vij.li. xv.s. viij.d. 

Hundr'de That is to sey John Pyke pyte collectour of Stourton — xxi.s. viij.d. 

Mere. The seid John Pyke pyte collectour of West Knoyle — v.s. viij.d. 
Thomas Forward senior pety collectour of Saylyscludon k Saylys- 
saylbery— iiij.s. vj.d. The seid Thomas Forward pety collectour of 
Gharnwyche — viij.d. The seid Thomas Forward pety collectour of 
Mere Wodlond — xl.s. Thomas Aysselocke pety collectour of Mere — 
xiiij.s. John Ryder pety collectour of Bradlye — xxxij.s. iiij.d. The 
seid John Ryder pety collectour of Kyngston Deverll— v.s. x.d. 

Dated under our scales k signe the day k yere aforeseid. 

Summa of the Hundred — iiij.li. xix. s. vij.d. 

William Ludlowe. Thomas Gauen. John Mohgax. 

Hie seal of M()V(j(in alone remains, apx>arently the letters " T.B." 

Endorsed : Pro subsydy. 

No. 42, 

MOXKTON DeVERELL. 

Ill 1 f)! 7 (No. 40 above) John Aiidrewe demised to William Powtoii 
(of a family belonging to Monkton Deverell, several of whose wills 
are in existence) ceiLaia lands in Monkton, &c., for twenty-one 
years. This lease would have expired in 1538. Perhaps Tlionu^s 
Westley took an assignment of it from Powton ; in any case, in 
1533 Andrews granUMl hini a fresh lease of them for the like term, 



'24 The Society's MSS. 

and the following document is Andrew's acquittance for the fine 
paid by Westley to secure the lease. 

45. 

4 Nov., " Memorandum that the iiij daye of Novembr' the xxv. yere 

1533. of the Eeign of our sovereign lord Kyng Henry the viij'''. 

J. John Andrewes & Johanne my wyffe haue receyued of 

Thomas Westley xj poundes sterlyng for a ffyne of and apon a state 

for terme of .xxj yeres made and graunted by the seid John and Johanne 

to the seid Thomas as by a peyre of Indentures ther of made more 

pleynly doth appere,"' &c. 

"Thise witnesses Eobert Eyre gent' Thomas Gyfford gent' and 
Thomas Toppe wyth many other." 

No. 43. 

The two documents which follow appear to belong to this series 
of Whitecliff deeds, &c., and are required to make up the tale of 
documents presented by Miss Hughes. They relate to the south- 
western side of the county and the parts adjoining in Somerset, 
and are thus not violently out of place in the collection. 

Hundred of Cawdox and Cadavorth. 

46. 

27 Nov., Bond by Thomas Slade, of Odstocke, CO. Wilts, " yoman," 

1553. Richard Lobbe, of the city of Salisbury, " berebrewer," 

and George Chaffyn, of the city aforesaid, " mercer," to 

Walter Hungerford, knight, sheriff of Wilts, in 10^., conditioned as 

follows : — 

" If the withyn bownden Thomas Slade his executours or assignes doo 
well and truly levy and gether all maner of summes of money dew unto 
our soveraign lord the king withyn the hunderd of Cawdon and 
Cadworth with all the amerseraents greane waxe and other sommes 
of money withyn the same hunderd for to be levied gethered and paid 
[and also of all maner of felones goodes wey ved goodes and strayers 
comyng and growyng withyn the seid hundred and above the summe 
of cxvs, doo awnswer and yeld interlineated] and of the same a true and 
juste accompte make to S"" Water Hungurfford knyghte sheriff of Wiltes 
at all tymes when he or they shall be therto requyred, and also pay or 
cause to be paid to the forseid S' Walter Hungurford knyghte foure 
powndes sexe shelynges and viijc?. in maner and forme ffolowyng that 
is to say xliijs. iiijcZ. in the ffeast of Estar nexte comyng after the date 
of this presentes [towardes the ffyrst payement of the proffers of the 
seid S" Water H. to be payed yn the Escheker inteo-lineated] and xliij.s. 
iiijc?. in the ffeast of seynt Mighell tharchangell then next folowyng 
[towardes the second payement of the proffers of the seid S' Water H. 
to be payed yn the seid Escheker with owte any fferther delay " the 



obligation to be void, &c. 



iVo. 44. 



The Society's MSS. 25 

Hundred of Frome. 
The family of Kelson, to which William Kelson of the following 
document presumably belonged, continued in the neighbourhood, 
particularly at Midsomer Norton, which is eight miles north-west 
of Frome, till recent times. 

4V. 
24 May, Warrant by Walter Hungerford, knight, lord Hungerford 
1540. of Haytisbury, one of the king's justices [of the peace] 
CO. Somerset, to the sheriff of Somerset, bailiffs, constables, 
and other officers, and to David liychardys bailiff of the hundred of 
Frome Sellwodde, to attach John Tedbury, of Laverton, in the said 
county, " liusbondman," to have the said John before him, or one of 
his fellows, justices of the peace in the said county, to find security to 
keep the peace towards the king and all his people, and particularly 
towards William Kelson, &c., who is gravely and manifestly threatened 
by the said John touching his life, mutilation of his members, and 
setting fire to his houses, as William has made corporal oath to him ; 
and if John refuse, to cause him to be taken to the king's gaol of the ' 
county aforesaid, to be kept there till he consent ; and they are to 
certify him and his fellow justices of the peace at the next general 
session of the peace to be held in county aforesaid how this warrant 
{mandatum) has been executed and to have there this warrant. 
Dated under his seal, 24 May, 32 Henry VIII. 

No. 45. 



Hundreds of Heytesbury, &c. 

With the following document we return to the Westley family, 
and again find Thomas Westley acting as "high collector " of a 
subsidy. 

48. 

20 Oct., WiLTES. This extracte Indentyd made the xx'^ daye of 

ir)4(). ()ctobre in the xxxij'" yere of the reygn of ouere soveraygn 

lorde kyng Henry the eyghte by us Edmonde Momepesson 

John Jionham Nycholas Sarvyngton and Wylliam Grene esquyers ffoure 

of the conunyssyourneres wytheyn the sayd countye ii'or taxyng sessyng 

and levyyng of the ffirst parte of the subcydye graunted to hys hyghnes 

by auctoryte of the hyghe courte of parlyament liolden at Westminster 

yn the seyd xxxij'" yere of liys moste nobyU reygn by vertu of his letteres 

])attentes to us and otliers in that behaltfc dyrectyd and by tliassent 

of us ami llir otlur connnyssyourncrs in tlio seyd letters pattnitc- 

si)ecylit<l alloMrd and assygned to the hundrciles of Horwellrs l)o\vn(> 

Weslx'iy \\'aiii\ster Heytreisbury and the libertye of TroughbriLj, and 

bythasscnf <it' us th(> s(>yd ronnnyssionrnrros havc^ olecte and chosyn 

'Plionias \\fstlc\ -vnt vllinan tn I.,, liy^hr colic, lor of thr sr\ d lumdrrdcs 



26 



The Societijs MSS. 



and libertye and to levy and gether every of the seyd somme and sommes 
as aryn the same extracte specyfied of the pety collectour.s wose names 
hereafter ar declared and to pay the same into the kynges receyte of 
hys escheker at Westminster to the use of oure sayd soveraygn lorde 
and also to accompte before the ryght honerable the barons of the 
kynges escheker accordyng to the acte of the seyd subcydye Deductyd 
owte of every pounde .vj.d for the ffee [of] the commyssyourneres hygh 
collector and pety collectors accordyng to the same acte. In wytnesse 
wherof wee the seyd commyssyourneres to thys present extracte have 
setto oure seales the day and yere above wrytyn. 
De Eoberto Barkesdale peti collectore 

hundred! de Horwe]]ysdowne 
De Henrico Longe peti collectore de 

subcidio hundred! de Wesbery 
De Willelmo Bevent peti collectore de 
subcidio hundred! de Warmyster 
De Cristof ero Asshelock pety collectore 

de subsidio hundred! de Heytresbury 
De Johanne Wellys peti collectore de 
subcidio liberatis de Trowhbrygg 



XX}. li. 



xix.s. 



xix.li. iiijs. 



xxxiji^. 


xiijs. 


ij.c^. 


xlviij^i 




xviijd 


xix.li. 


iijs. 


iiijc?. 



Summa totalis subcidii dictorum 
hundredorum ac libertatis 

Signed at foot : — 

Edmundus Mompesson. 
Nycholas Sarvyngton. 

Two seals remaining, effaced. 



cxlji^. x\].d. 

johanns bonham. 
William Grene. 

No. 46. 



The remarkable thing is, at least it seems remarkable, that 
Thomas Westley was required to collect 141Z. Is., and he got it all 
ill, as appears by the following quietus : — 



49. 



8 Feb., In the roll of accounts of the Subsidy. 
1540—1. 

Hundreds of Horewelles Downe, 

Westbury, Wamyster, 

Heytresbury with the liberty of 

Troughbrige in county Wiltes. 



Thomas Westley, gent., collector 
of the first payment of a certain 
subsidj^ granted to the now king 
Henry the eighth by the laity in 
the 32"*^ year of his reign in the 
hundreds and county aforesaid, under certain form in the act of 
parliament thereof enacted specified, as is contained in one part of 
certain indentures by Edmund Mompesson and others commissioners 
of the lord the king in this behalf to the treasurer and barons of this 
exchequer certified Renders account of 14lZ. 12c?. by him received of the 
said first payment of the subsidy aforesaid in the hundreds aforesaid. 
In the Treasury 137^. 10s. 6(Z. the eighth day of February in the 32"'^ 



I 



The Society s MSS. 27 

year of payment. And to the same collector as well for his fee as for 
the fees of the said commissioners and subcollectors 60s. Qd., viz,, at 
the rate of 2cZ. in the pound {de rata i]d. de lihra) for the fees of each 
of them according to the form and effect of the act of the grant of the 
sudsidy aforesaid. 

Et quietus est. 

No. 47. 

Til the next document we find Thomas Westley settling his son 

in marriage with the daughter of a Somerset squire of good 

descent: — 

50 
4 Dec, Indenture made 4 December, 4 Edward VI, between 
1550. Thomas Westley, of Whitcly ve, within the parish of Brighte- 
ston Deverell, co. Wilts, " gentilman," of the one part, and 
John Bucland, of Westharptre, co. Somerset, gent, of the other part, 
witnessing that it is agreed between them as follows, viz. : Thomas 
Westley covenants that Leonard Westley, his son and heir apparent, 
shall take to wife Agnes, one of the daughters of the said John Buc- 
land, before " the fest of the Purification of our Lady next," and John 
grants that Agnes shall take to husband Leonard ; Thomas grants that 
at John's request he will by deed give and grant to Leonard and Agnes 
before the feast of St. Margaret the Virgin after the said marriage an 
annuity of 6^. 13s. 4rZ. out of the said manor of Whitclyve for the term 
of their lives in survivorship ; Thomas grants that during his life he 
will find Leonard and Agnes and their children " competent and 
sufficient meate aud drynke and a convenient chamber for their degree 
within the manor house of the said manor of Whitclyve att the proper 
costes and charges of the said Thomas Westley " j provided if Leonard 
predecease Agnes after the marriage Thomas Westley covenants that 
he shall find her and her children convenient meat and drink so long 
as she continue in her " widowes estate " and afterward, if it happen 
her to marry, he, Thomas to be discharged from finding her and her 
children meat and drink saving only of one child whether it be son or 
daughter which shall happen to be heir to the said Leonard at the only 
proper costs and charges of the said Thomas ; John grants to pay 
Thomas " thre score and six poundes thirtene shelynges and foure 
pence," viz., 40/. on day of marriage, and 26/. 13s. Ad. at the feast of the 
Purification, 1551, for which payment he binds himself, etc., in the sum 
of three hundred marks, and Thomas in the lik-e sum by these presents. 
{Signed) per me Johanem Buckland. 

A'o. 48. 

jMonktox Drvkkeli.. 

In nuinbors 40 and 45 above we had refereiice.s to a })roperty 
)articularly deseiilied in No. 40 as lands in IMonkton, (ireat 
nd Little Whitetdive and. lioires in the j)aiish of Deverell 



28 The Society s MSS. 

Langbiidge with pasturage in the manor of Monkton Deverell. 
This Thomas Westley took on lease. It was presumably distinct 
from a property which Thomas subsequently bought, described as 
lands in Cod ford Mary and Bores in the parishes of Codford 
Mary and Monkton Deverell, or again as lands in Codford Mary 
Little Whiteclive, Bores and Monkton Deverell, though situate 
in much the same places. 

The latter property had become divided into " purparties '^ 
among certain coheirs. Eichard Atkinson held one purparty in 
right of Agnes his wife, and this he sold, it being then in the 
occupation of Thomas Westley, gent., and John Farley, gent., to 
Eobert Baylly. John Webb appears by a fine to have held 
another purparty in his own right, and this he sold to John 
Farley, gent. By what is presumably only a coincidence, John 
Eichmond alias Webb, a century and more later, on the sale of 
the manor of Lydiard Millicent, settled at " Monkton." Finally 
Eobert Baylly sold his property to Thomas Westley. 

51. 

3 June, Indenture made 3 June, 36 Henry VIII., between Richard 

1544. Atkynsun of Wyndesor, co. Bucks, " yeman " and Agnes his 

wife, of the one part, and Bobert Baylly, of Codford Marye, 

CO. Wilts, husbondman, of the other, witnessing that Eichard and Agnes 

for the sum of iL, whereof 5l. 6s. 8d. " ys before hande payd " to them 

and 34s. ^d. residue to be paid to them " at the daye of thensealyng of 

thes presentes" have given, granted, bargained and sold and by these 

presents grant, &c., to the said Robert " All that their purpertie, parte, 

. and portion of all the landes," &c., in Codford Marye and Bores within 

the parishes of Codford Marye and Mounckton Deverell, co. Wilts "that 

to the said purpartie parte and portion of the said Agnes" belongeth, 

now being in the tenure and occupation of Thomas Westley, " gentil- 

man," and John Farley, gent., "as all charters, evidencez," &c., to the 

same apperteining, to hold to the said Robert, his heirs and assigns, (fee. 

Signed by marks ; two seals. 

■ No. 49. 
52. 
V June, Indenture of feoffment by same to same of same, which 
1554. belongs to them in right of the said Agnes ; warranty against 
all men, for themselves and their heirs ; attorneys to deliver 
seisin, Richard Myddylecote and John Muleton. Dated, 7 June, 36 
Henry VIII. Seals. 

No. 50. 



The Societf/s MSS. 29 

53. 
6 April, Final concord in the quinzaine of Easter, 5 Edward VI., 

1551. between John Farley, gent., querent, and John Webb, gent., 
deforciant, of a moiety of a mensuage, of two gardens, of 

two orchards, of 200a. land, of 20a. meadow and of 200a. pasture and 
common of pasture for 250 shee}) and 20 oxen in Codford Mary, Lytell 
WhytclyfF, liores and Munckton Deverell. John Webb acknowledged 
the said moieties and common of pasture to be the right of John Farley 
as those which John has by his gift and quitclaimed for himself and 
his heirs, to John and his heirs, with warranty for himself and his heirs ; 
for this John gave him 40^. Wiltes. 

Feet of Fines, Wilts. 

54. 
6 May, Release by Robert Baylly, of Burton, within the parish of 

1552. Warmystre, co. Wilts, husbandman, to Thomas Westley, 
gent., and his heirs of all his right in all that his part of all 

the lands, <kc., situate in Codford Marys and Bores within the parishes 
of Codford Marys and Monketon Deverell, co. Wilts, which the said 
Thomas purchased of him as by his charter of feoffment dated the last 
day but one of April, 6 Edward VI. appears. Which purchase was to 
the use of the said Thomas, his heirs and assigns. Dated 6 May, 6 
Edward VI. Seal. 

No. 51. 

Westbury. 

Slightly out of order date, Thomas AVestley is lueiitioiied, as 
under, apparently as feoffee for neighbours. 



G April, Thomas Westley, party to fine in the quinzaine of Easter, 
1551. 5 J^]dward VI., whereby John Husee and Margaret, his 
wife, grant a fulling mill, &c., in Ligh in Westbury, to 
Geoffrey Wheatacre for 61 years (after expiration of a term of seven 
years which Thomas Edwards has with reversion to John and his heirs) 
at 53s. 4t/. rent to be i)aid to Westley, with reversion of the premises to 
John and ]\Iargaret and John's heirs. 

Feet of Fines, Wilts, 



GkKAT AViiri'KCl.IKF. 

The John llusoo nientioiuHl in tlie al)ove fine occurs again a 
couple of }'ears later, for presuina])ly it is the same man, this time 
ixs party to a line which records the settlement made by Thomas 
Westley on his \vil'(\ Tliat she was (he mother of his heir ap})cars 
by a sul)se(|uent (K)cunicnt, 



30 The Society's MSS. 

56. 
28 Jan'', Final concord in the quinzaine of Hilary, 6 Edward VI., 
1552 — 3. between William Percy, Thomas Gyfford and John Husse, 
querents, and Thomas Westley and Edith his wife, defor- 
ciants, of the manor of Great Whyteclyve, and a messuage, garden, 
200a. land, 40a. meadow, dOOa. pasture, 30a. wood and common of pas- 
ture for 90 (nongentas) sheep in Whitcly ve, to wit Thomas Westley and 
Edith acknowledged the said manor, tenements and common of 
pasture to be the right of William, as those which William, Thomas, 
and John have of the gift of the said Thomas, and remitted and quit 
claimed from them, Thomas and Edith, and their heirs to William, 
Thomas and John, and the heirs of William, and besides the said 
Thomas and Edith have granted for them and the heirs of Thomas 
that they will warrant, &c., against all men ; for this William, Thomas, 
and John granted to the said Thomas and Edith the said manors, 
tenements, and common of pasture to hold to the said Thomas and 
Edith and the heirs of Thomas' body, with remainder in default to 
Thomas' right heirs. Wiltes. 

Feet of Fines, Wilts. 

Thomas Westley died in 1561, and his son Leonard in the 
following year. The inquisition taken after the death of the 
father is preserved only in the copy of it made for the Court of 
Wards, and the text is obviously unsatisfactory. JSTo mention is 
made in it of the lands in Ash ton and Durrington ; apart from 
this omission (the reason for which appears subsequently) we 
meet again with all the lands of which we have studied the prior 
title, with the important addition of their quantities and tenures. 

57. 
Wiltes. Inquisition taken at Warmyster, 29 March, 3 Elizabeth 
(1561) before Nicholas Pyrrie, escheator, by virtue of a writ of 
diem clausit after the death of Thomas Westley, gentleman. Long 
before his death he was seised in fee tail of the manor of Great 
{Magna) Whitlyve {sic.) a messuage, garden, dovecot, 200a. land, 40a. 
meadow, 300a. pasture, 30a. wood and common of pasture for ninety 
sheep pasturing on . Great White[c]lyve, also common of pasture for 
two oxen, one horse {affrum) and twenty sheep in Little {Parva) 
Whit[c]lyve, and of certain lands and tenements in Ambresburie, 
Bradford, Borer {sic) and Salisbury co. Wilts as of free tenement, and 
being so seised a fine was levied in the quinzaine of Hilary, 6 Edward 
VL (Jan., 1552— 3), between William Percie, Thomas Gyfford and John 
Hussey, querents, and the said Thomas Westley and Edith his wife, 
deforciants, of the above manor, &c., in Great Whiteclyve, whereby the 
said Thomas and Edith quitclaimed, &c., to the said William and the 
others, with warranty for themselves and the heirs of Thomas, for 



The Society s MSS. 31 

which acknowledgment, quitclaim and warranty William and the 
others gave the said manor, &c., to the said Thomas and Edith and 
the heirs of the body of Thomas, They were seised thereof accordingly, 
he in fee tail and she in her demesne as of free tenement, and after- 
wards he died and she survived him and is now seised thereof 
according to the form of the fine. 

Further the jurors say that long before the levying of the fine afore- 
said the said Thomas Westley and Edith with the aforesaid Edith was 
seised {sic.) of the said manor and other the premises by virtue of 
jointure by the said Thomas to the said Edith thereof made, by their 
charter, 5 Feb. 5 Edward VI. (1550 — 51) in consideration of matrimony 
had between Leonard Westley son and heir apparent of the said 
Thomas and Agnes l^ucland one of the daughters of John Bucland of 
Westharptre, co. Somerset, gent, they gave {sic.) to the same 
Leonard and Agnes his wife an annuity of 6/. 13s. 4cZ. out of all those 
lands, (tc, within their manor of Great Whit[c]lyve for the term of 
the lives of the said Tjconard and Agnes in survivorship, by virtue of 
which charter the said Leonard and Agnes were and still are seised of 
the said annuity. 

Further the jurors say that one Robert Baylye of Burton within the 
parish of Warmyster co. Wilts, husbandman, by his charter, 29 April,. 
6 Edward VI. (1552) sold, gave, &c., to Thomas Westley all that his 
part of and in all the aforesaid lands, &c., to the said Thomas, his- 
heirs and assigns and to their use, by virtue whereof the said Thomas 
was seised of and in all that part of the premises and died so seised. 

The said manor of Great White[c]lyve, worth 20 marks, is held of 
Henry Sturmy by service of :^ of a knight's fee. 

The lands and tenements in Little White[c]live are held of John 
Turbut by a rose for all service and are worth yearly 13s. 4(/. 

The lands and tenements in Ambresburie are held of Edward, earl 
[of] Harford, as of his manor of Ambresburie, by the rent of ^t/., worth 
yearly 15s. 

The lands and tenements in Bradford are held of William, earl [of] 
Pembroke, as of his manor of Bradford by lid. rent for all service, 
AN'orth yearly Qs. 8d. 

The lands and tenements in Salisbury are held of the bishop of 
Salisbury by suit of his court at Salisbury for all service, worth 8s. 

The lands and tenements lately i)urchased as aforesaid and lying in 
J^orer are held of John Thynne, knight, as of his manor of Mouncketon 
Dcverell by 15^^/. rent at Michaelmas and suit of his court o( 
Mouncketon Deverell for all service, worth yearly 6s. 8r/. 

The lands and tenements in Oodford St. Mary {Codford Jfan'c) are 
In'ld <'t' -loliii Ilarecourte, kuiglit, by suit of court only, wortli vearlv 
i3s. hi. 

He died 23 Novcmbrr last (1561). The said Leonard Westley is his 
son and heir, aguil at tlic time of this iiuiuitition tliirty-six years and 
more. 

I)i'j.<. Court of Wards, vol. S, fo/to J)5. 



32 The Society's MSS. 

In the inquisition after the son's death the lands in Ashton and 
Durrington re-appear. It is stated that Leonard Westley was 
seised of the reversion of them expectant on the death of Anne 
Tycheborn, widow, and tliat the matter is explained by a fine 
levied in 3 Henry VIII. It is quite true that John Westley levied 
a fine of these lands in that year to Malhom and others, and we 
have printed an abstract of it, No. 36, above ; but by the indenture 
which follows (No. 37) Malhom and the others gave these lands 
back to John for life, with remainder to Thomas, his son, in tail, 
with remainders over, and this indenture was executed at any 
rate by Malhom and the others (No. 39). It is noteworthy, how- 
ever, that John levied a fine of these particular lands, whereas he 
suffered a recovery to Malhom and the others of all his other 
possessions, as thougli the lands in Ashton and Durrington were 
to pass in some other channel than the rest ; and it is conceivable 
that the indenture was never executed by John himself. What- 
ever the explanation may be, it seems possible that the Anne 
Tycheborn, widow, mentioned in the following inquisition may be 
identical with Agnes Westley, daughter of John Westley, the 
younger, son of John, mentioned in the entail in No. 37. The 
names not infrequently are interchangeable. 

58. 

Inquisition taken at Warmyster, 3 Oct., 4 Elizabeth (1562) on a writ 
of diem clausit (25 June, 4 Eliz., 1562), after the death of Leonard 
Westeley, gent. 

WiLTES. He was seised in fee tail at the time of his death of certain 
lands and tenements in Little {Parvot) Whytcly ve, Bradforde, Ambres- 
burye, Bores and Salisbury, and common of pasture for two oxen, one 
horse {affrum) and twenty sheep in Little Whyteclyve, as by a fine 
levied in Trinity Term, 3 Henry VIII (June — July, 1511), appears. 

He was seised in fee at the time of his death of certain lands and 
tenements, meadows, feedings and pastures, in Codforde Mary and 
Bores within the parishes of Codforde Marye and Monkton Deveryll. 

He was seised at the time of his death, to him and his heirs, in 
reversion after the death of Edyth, his mother, of the manor of 
Whytclyve and of a messuage, a garden, a dovecot, 200a. land, 40a. 
meadow, 300a. pasture, 30a. wood and of common of pasture for ninety 
{novingenf) sheep pasturing in Great (Magna) Whytclyve, as by fine 
thereof in the quinzaine of Hilary, 6 Edward VI. (Jan., 1552-3) appears. 

He was seised at the time of his death in fee tail, to himself and the 
heirs of his body, oi the reversion of certain lands and tenements after 



The Society's MSS. 3 3 

the death of Anne Tycheborne, widow, in Duryngton, and certain lands 
and tenements called Rodshawe, lying in Sawsers Ayshton in the 
parish of Styple Aysheton, which the said Anne held, and now holds, 
for the term of her life with reversion expectant to the said Leonard 
and the heirs of his body, as by fine in Trinity Term 3 Henry YIII 
(June — July, 1511) appears. 

The said lands, &c,, in Little Whyteclyve are held of the heirs of 
John Turbut, gent., by free socage, viz., a red rose and fealty for all 
service, and are worth 13s. 4d 

The said lands and tenements in Bradforde are held of William, earl 
of Pembroke, as of his manor of Bradforde, and are worth 6.s. Sd. 

The said lands, tkc, in Ambresburye are held of Edward, earl of 
Hertforde, as of his manor of Ambresburie by the rent of ^d, and are 
worth lo.s. 

The said lands, itc, in Bores are held of John Thyne, knight, as of 
his manor of ALowiikton Deverell by 20|J. rent, and are worth 6.s. 8c/. 

The said lands and tenements in Salisbury are held of the bishop of 
Salisbury by suit of court at Salisbury, for all service, and are worth 8s. 

The said lands, tfec, in Codforde Marye are held of John Herycorte, 
knight, by suit of court only, and are worth 13s. ^d. 

The said manor of Great Whyteclyve and the said messuage, garden, 
dovecot, 200a. land, 40(%. meadow, 300a. pasture, 30a. wood, and common 
of pasture for ninety {novingt') sheep pasturing in Great Whyteclyve, 
are held of the heirs of Henry Sturmi by knight-service, viz., ^ of a 
knight's fee, and are worth 20 marks. 

The said lands and tenements in Duryngton are held of the warden 
and scholars of New College of Winchester by the rent of 1^6. pepper, 
for all service, and are worth U. 13s. 4c?. 

The said lands and tenements in Radshawe {sic) in Sawsers Aysheton 
in the parish of Stepleaysheton are held of the Queen, as of her manor 
of Sty ply aysheton freely in socage, by 10s. rent and suit of court for all 
service. 

He died 28 May last (1562). Thomas W^esteley is his son and heir 
and was aged, 14 September last, 11 years. 

Chancery I. P.M., Series IL, vol. 132 (30) ; Exchequer 
Transcrij^t^ Series 11.., file 1001 (15). 

The three following documents relate to Thomas, son of Leonard. 
That he married in 1570, Juliana Perte, who survived him, appears 
by the inquisition, No. 62, below. 

59. 

12 Nov. " Be it known unto all men by thes presentes that T 

1575. William Cross of Nemnett," co. Somerset, "yeman," have 

iH'leased to Thomas Westley, of Litton, co. Somerset, gent., 

all niannei- of actions, il'c. " to this acquittance generall " " I have putt 

my scale," 12 November, 17 Elizabeth. Signed by mark. Witnesses, 

"John Allyn ami Peter Lane the wryter hereof." Seal. 

Xo. 5'S. 

VOL. XXXVll. — NO. (XV. D 



34 The Society s MSS. 

60. 

23 March, Bond by Thomas Westley, of Brixton Deverell, co. Wilts, 
1586 — 7. gent., to Matthew Ewens, of Sylton, co. Dorset, esquire, 
and Thomas Turbervile, of Beare Kegis, co. Dorset, 
esquire, in 800^. for divers merchandises bought of them ; in default of 
payment to be subject to the penalty of the statute for merchants, &c. 
That recognizance was made before Thomas Eyre, mayor of Salisbury, 
keeper of the greater, and Giles Estcourt, esq., clerk of the Queen, 
keeper of the lesser, piece of the Queen's seal, deputed for receiving 
recognizances of debts within the city of Salisbury. In witness whereof 
his seal, together with the seal of the said Queen ordained for receiv- 
ing such recognizance of debts within the city aforesaid, was appended 
thereto. Dated 23 March, 29 Elizabeth. Signed Tho : Westley, Gyles 
Estcourte. Seals torn off. 

Indorsed Statutes canseled. 

No. 53. 

61. 

19 March, " This indenture made " 19 March, 30 Elizabeth, between 

1587 — 8. Edward Horton, of Westwood, co. Wilts, gent., of the 

one part, and Thomas Westley, of " Clanger in the 

paryshe of Cucklington," co. Somerset, gent., of the other, Witnesseth 

that whereas the said Thomas " by his wrytinge obligatorye of Statute 

Marchand " of even date, acknowledged before Richard Willyamson, 

mayor of Salisbury, and " Christopher Weekes, Clarke of the said 

Statutes " stands bound to Edward in 120^. Nevertheless Edward 

covenants that if Thomas pay 73/, 6s. 8d. on 26 March, 1589, at 

Edward's dwelling house in Westwood, the writing to be void. 

Signed Edward Horton. Endorsed Horton defezaunce. 

No. 54. 

In the above three documents Thomas Westley is variously 
described as of Litton, co. Somerset, Brixton Deverell, co. Wilts, 
and Cucklington, co. Somerset. Possibly he farmed at the ad- 
dresses in Somerset : but whatever his leaseholds, no mention is 
made at his death in 1621 of the patrimony at Durrington, The 
other holdings at Whiteclive, &c., reappear, and for the last time. 

62. 

Writ of diem clausit, Thomas Westley, gent., 13 July, 20 James 
(1622). Wilts. 

Inquisition at Trobridge, 3 September, 20 James (1622) by virtue of 
writ of diem clausit after the death of Thomas Westley, gent., before 
George Mervin, gent., escheator. 

Long before his decease he was seised in fee of the manor of 
Whitclyve alias Great (Magna) Whitclyve, and of a messuage, garden, 



The Society's MSS. 35 

dovecot, 200a. land, 40a. meadow, 300a. pasture and 30a. wood, in 
Oreat Whitclyve ; 

and of a messuage and 4a, land in Little Whitclyve ; 

and of 40a. land and pasture in Bores ; 

and of a messuage, garden, and 8a. land in Bradford ; 

and of a messuage, garden, and IGOct. meadow and pasture in West 
Ashton ; 

and of \\<i. pasture in Westburie under "le plaine; " 

and being so seised levied a fine thereof in the octave of Hilary, 
1 7 Eliz. to Thomas Chambers, gent., and Charles Badger, gent., and 
the heirs of Thomas, to the use of himself and one Juliana Perte, 
afterwards his wife, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder in 
default to the use of himself and his heirs, as by indenture 20 
January, 17 Eliz. (1574—5) between the said Thomas Chambers and 
Amy {Amiam) his wife, of the one part, and the said Thomas 
Westley of the other, appears. 

He died at Brixton Deverell, 31 October, 19 James (1621). The said 
Juliana survived him and is lying at Brixton Deverell solely seised of 
the premises in fee tail by survivorship. 

The manor of Great Whitclyve, &c., held of the heirs of Henry 
Sturmy by knight-service, viz., ^ of a knight's fee, worth 20 marks. 

liand, &c., in Little Whitclyve held of John Turbutt, gent., in free 
socage, by fealty and the rent of a rose for all service, worth 13s. Ad. 

Land, etc., in Bores, held of Thomas Thynne, knight, as of his manor 
of Monckton Deverell, in free socage, by fealty and lis. lid. rent, 
worth 26s. 8c/. 

Land, &c., in Bradford, held of Richard, earl of Clanricard, and 
Frances, his wife, in her right, as of their manor of Bradford, in free 
socage, by fealty and 17J. rent, worth 6s. M. 

Land, &c., in West Ashton, held of Charles, prince of Wales, as of 
his manor of Steple Ashton, in free socage, by fealty and 10s. rent, for 
all ervice, worth 50s. 

Land in Westburie, held of James Ley, knight and baronet, chief 
justice of the King's Bench, as of his manor of Westburie Arrundell by 
fealty and Id. rent, worth Qd. 

Thomas Westley, gent., is his son and heir, and is aged 40 and more. 

{Signed) Georue Mervin, kc. 
Iiiq. post viortevi, Chancery. Series TL, vol. 394 (38). 

Of Thomas Westley, l\\c. third, we have no information whatever 
beyond tlie fact that, lie was heir to liis father, Thomas, as above. 
]Ie was in turn succhmmUmI hy, presumably, his son, Jasper Westley. 
TIku'i; is nKMitinii (.f this Jasper in an article contril)nte(I to the 
JIaytf.iiir 1>}' Mr. Waylcii (vol. xwi., p. .'507), which sccnis lo sui;- 
gest that he was no Royalist. liS I'V.h.-L* ]\lareh, lG4r)-G,' Mr. Jasi)er 
Westley, of Whitley, ha\iiiL;- pn^viously paid 10/. to Major Wansey 

D 



36 The Society s MSS. 

now subscribes 20/. more." He appears to have had two sons^ 

Michael and Ephraim, the latter of whom was presumably his 

heir. 

63. 
10 Sept., Eelease by Michael Westley, of Brixton Deverell, co- 
1647. Wilts, gent., to Jasper Westley, his father, of Brixton 
Deverell, gent., of all manner of actions, &c. 10 Septem- 
ber, 23 Charles, 1647. 

Signed Michael Westley. 
Witnesses, Jo : Wadman, John Lodge, the mark of Nowell Kerly 

No. 55. 
64. 
24 Dee., Counterpart of demise, 24 December, 15 Charles II., by 
1663. Effraim Westley the elder of Whitclift in the parish of 
Brixton Deverell, co. Wilts, gent., to William Coomes, of 
Mounckton Deverell, co. Wilts, aforesaid, husbandman, in consideration 
of 9/. 10s. in hand paid, of dwelling house with garden lately in the 
possession of Peter Harden and Anne his wife, both deceased, to hold 
to the said William, Sara his wife, and WilHam his son, from day of 
date for the term of their lives successively and the longest liver of them,, 
they covenanting to keep house in repair, fence the garden and cut 
down no trees : also to " make the dry hedge by the water side in the 
ground called Ellmes," Effraim Westley " allowing the frith and bring- 
ing it in place sufficient for making the same." 
Signed The marke of William Coomes. 
Witnesses' names endorsed Thomas Westley, Joseph Westley, Thomas. 
Kirly, Steven Marchment. 

No. 56. 

The accompanying pedigree will serve to illustrate the succession 

of persons of the name of Westley at Whiteclive. The remaining 

documents presented by Miss Hughes relate to quite other places 

and persons. 



ISTewham in Sutton Veny. 

65. 
Release by Alice daughter of William Vitery to Richard Munte of 
the whole tenement w^hich Hugh le Webb (textor) formerly held in 
the town of Nywenham with la. land ; also grant to him of a house 
with curtilage, which she formerly held of him, between the tenement 
of William Durant on the north and Richard's tenement on the south ;. 
rent, a peppercorn at Michaelmas if demanded, for all service, suit of 
court, &c. ; for this Richard gave her 10s. beforehand. Witnesses, John 
de Cretnale, William de Lavinton, clerk, Thomas le Vinitir, John de 
Bruera, Richard Scarlet, Adam Passevant, Peter de Niwenham and 
other. Endorsed Newnam. 

No. 57. 



Pedigree (No. II.) to illustrate succession of owners of manor of Great Whitecliff. 



John Westley, of Whiteclive [born about 1450],=Joan 

cousin and heir to Eichard Panys and Alice, I occurs 
his wife ; occurs 1495-6 ; made settlement of | widow, 
lands 1511 : dead before 14 Oct., 1521. 1521-2. 



Peter Stanter=Alice, eldest Eoger Frees, = Margaret, 



daughter, 
[born about 
1478] mar- 
ried 1496 ; 
apparently 
dead, 1511. 



of Horning- 
sham, gent.. 
1511. 



living 
1511. 



Thos. Polsham,: 
living 1511. 



=Avice, 
living 
1511. 



I i 

Thomas Westley =Edith John Westley,: 



[born about 
1481], first in 
entail 1511; oc- 
curs 1533,1552; 
settled lands 
1553; died 23 
Nov., 1561. 



Leonard Westley, found heir to father,: 
aged 36 and more [therefore born 
about 1525, when father was between 
40 and 50] ; died 28 May, 1562. 



Agnes, d. of John Buckland, 
mar. sett'., 4 Dec, 1550. 



Thomas Westley, born 14th Sept., 1551,= 
found heir to father ; of Litton, Som- 
erset, 1575 ; of Brixton Deverell, 1587 ; 
of Cucklington, Somerset, 1588. Died 
31 Oct., 1621. 



= Juliana Perte [perhaps daughter of Amy, 
wife of Thos. Chambers, gent.] Mar. 
sett'., 20 Jan., 1574-5. Survived husband. 



occurs 1553 ; ajiparently , 
survived hus- dead in 1511. 1 
band. I 



Agnes [born about 1507], 
mentioned in entail 1511 ; 
perhaps the Anne Tych- 
born, widow, living 1562. 



I I ■ 

Ellen. 

Joan. 
Both 
living 
unmar. 
1511. 



Thomas Westley, found heir to^ 
father, aged 40 and more 
[therefore born about 1576]. 



Jasper Westley, of Brixton Deverill: 
[born about 1606], occurs 1646-7. 



Michael Westley 
[born about 
1626], occurs 
1647. 



William Westley, of Brixton = 
Deveril], innholder. | 



I 
Ephraim Westley, occurs, as of 
Whiteclive, the elder, 1663; 
described as "of WhitcliflF, 
esq.," in Bloom's list of 
gentry of Wiltshire, 1673. 



Amy Wesley, mar. lic.=Eoger Bedborrow ; bondman, 
27 June, 1633. George Bedborrow, of Salis- 

bury, innholder. 



The Society s MSS. 37 



Sunday, Indenture of demise l)y Adam le Saugar' of Nywenham 
10 March, to Eobert le Couk of Dereby and Agnes his wife, for 
1335 — G, the term of their lives in survivorship, of a x^lace of 
land between his house of Nywenham and the cottage 
of Thomas Goscelyn, with the curtihige adjacent, 2 perches, 12 feet long 
by 23 feet wide ; rent, Id. at Christmas and Id. at Easter, for all ser- 
vice. Witnesses, Thomas Goscelyn, Geoffrey Warr', John le Potter, 
William Passevant, Richard Gilebert. Dated at Nywenham, Sunday 
before St, Gregory the Pope, 10 Edward III. Endorsed Newenham. 

No. 58. 



Sutton Veny, Little Sutton, Newham, Crockekton, Bugley. 

6V. 

Thursday, 14 Feoffment by Richard Parkere and Eleanor his 
Feb., 1369 — 70. wife to Sir (dominis) William Gardyner, rector of 
the church of Great Wychford and Eborald {Ebor- 
aldo) Hagworthyngham, chaplain, of all their lands, &c., in Little 
Sotton, Great Sotton, Newenham, Crockerton, and Boggele ; warranty 
against all men. Witnesses, Lawrence de Sancto Martino, Peter 
Escudamor, knights, Thomas Hungerford, William Waspayl, John 
Cnottyngesleye, William Langeford, John Mannyng, and other. Dated 
at Great {Magnum) Sotton, Thursday the feast of St. Valentine, 44 
Edward III. i^taU. 

No. 59. 



Newnham, Sutton, Ckockerton. 

68. 
Monday, Indenture of feotfment l)y John Lcverich, of Sutton, to 
5 Dec, Nicholas Ronliam and Isabel his wife of all his lands ttc. as 
1300. fully as he had them by the gift and feoffment of Nicholas 
Ronluim and Edith his wife in Newnam, Sutton and 
Crockerton ; to hold to the said Nicholas and Isabel and the heirs 
male of the body of Nicholas ; and if it happen Nicholas to die with- 
out heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, the lands, etc., to remain 
to Thomas r)Onhani son and heir of the said Nicholas and Edith, and 
his heirs for ever ; warranty to Nicholas and Isabel, and the heirs 
male of the body of Nicholas, and in the case hai)])ening, to the said 
M'lionias ,111(1 his licirs. Witnesses, John Stile, Thomas Osliounie, 
,b»hii Toiik, .loliii DotiilK'rof Hodliurste, William Ui)ton and many 
otlur. I)ali(l at Ncwiiaiu, ^foiulay before tlie Conception of St. 
Marv, 11 lli.hanl II. S,uL 

N'K (10. 



38 The Society's MSS. 

Sutton Veny, Newham. 

69. 

Wednesday, Indenture of demise by Nicholas Bonham to Thomas 

29 Sept., Nywe of Byschopestre of 11a. In arable lying in the- 

1400. fields of Sotton and ISTywenam, whereof 2a. lie on the 

north of the tenement of the said Nicholas between. 

land of John atte Borwgh on either side, 4a. at Cokeshellon, la, 3r. on. 

Schortbrom, one head butting on the way which leads towards Norton,. 

la. at Mullehulle next " la Akerdich," 2a. on the north of Great 

Sutton, one head butting on Akerdich, ^a. at " le Dedman " between 

land of John Pole and John Selwode ; to hold for three years ; rent, a 

rose {rosam flori) for all service. Witnesses, John Laffull, John Style,, 

Robert Leverich, John Alayn, John Osebarn and other. Dated at 

Nywenam, Wednesday the feast of St. Michael, 1 Henry IV. Seal. 

No. 61. 
10. 

30 Sept., Indenture of demise by Isabel, relict of Nicholas Bonham,, 
1409. to John Faunt and Joan,his wife,of a cottage with curtilage 
in Nywenham, opposite the manse {manso) late of the said 
Nicholas, and 4ia. Ir. arable lying in the fields of Fenny sutton and 
Nywenham, whereof la. lies extending over Putmede next land of John 
atte Pole, another acre lies at Hobbesdote between land of John Wynde- 
sore and lande of John Vincent, a half-acre lies in Hengseborgh on th e- 
west side of land of the prior of Bradelegh, another half -acre lies in the 
same tilth {cultura) next land of John Mounte, another half-acre lies at 
Poleshegende between land of William Haukins and land of Walter 
Tuccede, another half-acre lies at the north end of the said half -acre 
extending to Norton next land of John Selewode, \r. lies at the north 
end of the said half-acre in length extending to Norton between land 
of John atte Pole, another rood lies next Mountemulle extending to 
the east upon Lorlake, another rood lies in Hudescombe at the end of 
the close called Leveriggesheg ; to hold to them for the term of the life 
of the said Isabel rendering to her yearly 6s. by quarterly payments, 
and a heriot of the price of 12c?, after John's death ; they are to keep 
the cottage in repair, with right of re-entry in default, &c. Witnesses,. 
John Osebern, Robert Leverich, William Pole, Thomas Laffull, William 
Vincent and other. Dated at Nywenham, the morrow of St. Michael 
in the year of King Henry the fourth the eleventh beginning {intrante} 
Seal. Endorsed Newenham and Feny Sutton. 

No. 62. 

Newham, Sutton Yeny, Crockerton, Waeminstee. 

20 May, Feoffment by John Bonam to John Champayn of a messuage 

1467. with all lands, &c., which he has in Newnam, Fenni Sutton„ 

Crockerton and Warmestir or elsewhere within the hundred 

of Warmester aforesaid, which he late purchased, to him, his heirs and 

assigns, for ever of Nicholas Bonam, his brother, as in a certain charter 



The Socidijs MSS. 39 

thereof made is more fully contained ; warranty against all men. 
Witnesses, Robert Osburne, Robert Vincent, Simon Robins and many 
other. Dated at Newham aforesaid, 20 May, 7 Edward IV. Seal. 

No. 63. 
72. 
1 Nov., Feoffment by John Bonham of Newnam, co. Wilts, 
1468. " gentelman," to John Champayn of Buschupistre, "gentel- 
man," of all his land, &c., in Newnam aforesaid, Crokerton, 
Great Sutton (Sutton Mar/na), Warmyster, and elsewhere in the county 
of Wilts ; warranty against all men. Witnesses, Thomas Spray, clerk, 
John Borton, Thomas Lecforde, Robert Vyncent, John Vyrgo and 
other. Dated at Newnam on the feast of All Hallows, 8 Edward IV. 
Seal. 

No. 64. 
73. 

21 June, Feoffment by John Bonam to John Champayn of a 
1484. messuage with all the lands, itc, which he has in Newnam. 
Fenny Sutton, Crokerton and Warmestr' or elsewhere 
within the hundred of Warmestr' aforesaid, which he, the said John 
Bonam, lately had, to him his heirs and assigns, by the gift and feoffment 
of Nicholas Bonam, his brother, as in a certain charter thereof made is 
more fully contained ; warranty against all people. Witnesses, Robert 
Osborn, Robert Vynsent, Simon Robynys and many other. Dated at 
Newnam, 21 June, 1 Richard III. Seal, 

No, 65. 

Newham, &c., and Hatchbuey. 
74. 
19 Feb., " This by 11 made the xix"' daye of Februarye," 20 Elizabeth 
1577-8. " witnessethe that I Walter Bonham of Create Wishforde,' 
CO. Wilts, esq. "have receyvyd of Rychard Chapman alias 
Hiscock of Hewis in the countye aforesayde yeman," 40^. "in parte of 
paymente of a more summe towarde the purchasynge of certayne landes 
lyinge'and beynge in Newnham, Crokerton, Wormuster and Hachburye," 
(fee. Signed per me Walterum Bonham. Signed, &c., in the presence 
of Wyllyam Skyllyng, Thomas Hatton, George Hartgyll. Seal. 

No, 66. 

Nkwiiam, Suttox Veny, Warminster, Heytesburv. 

7;"). 

ir)80. Countci'iJart of Indenture made the day of 

22 Elizabeth, between Richard Chapman alias^ Hiscokes, of Huishe, co. 
Wilts, yeoman, of the one i)art, and Walter Bonham of Wyshforde, co. 
Wilts, es(iuire, of the other, being the defeasance of a statute merchant, 
acknowledged by Bonham before John Baylie, mayor of Salisbury, and 
Giles Escourte, es(i. ''clarke of the statutes there," dated "> April. -20 
Eliz. (ir)78) to Chapman in -100/. viz. if Chapman have, to him and his 
heirs for ever, and to their use, all that capital messuage and tenement. 



40 The Society's MSS. 

60a. arable, 10a. meadow, 6a. pasture " and the share of one acre of 
medowe in the lott meade," in Newman, in the parish of Venny Sutton, 
CO. Wilts, now or late in the tenure or occupation of Walter Berington, 
gent, and Robert Chamberlayne, or their assigns ; and all that messuage 
and tenement, garden and orchard, 6a. arable, ^a. meadow, in Sutton 
aforesaid,now or late in the tenure of occupation of — Hynton; a cottage 
in Sutton, now or late in tenure, &c., of Marye Hibberde ; 9a. arable in 
the common fields of Warmister, co. Wilts "and the share of one aker 
of meadowe lyinge and beinge in the common meade of Haytesburye " 
in the said county ; and all other the lands, &c., of the said Walter 
Bonham whatsoever, lying and being in Sutton, Warmister and 
Heytesburye aforesaid, &c., discharged from all grants, &;c., except 
the rents and services to the chief lords, and except " one 
estate of the demise of the said capital! messuage" in Sutton 
" by William Mondaye made " to Walter Berington and Robert 
Chamberlayne for the term of five years yet to come, &c. ; according to 
a deed indented of bargain and sale between the said Bonham and 
Chapman, dated 5 April, 20 Elizabeth, the statute to be void, &c. 
Signed Walter Bonham. Sealed, &c., in the presence of Anthony Parry 
and John Hiscox. 

No. 67, 
76. 

A note of the conveyaunces from Walter Bonham esquire to 

Richard Chepman alias Hitchcock of his landes in Sutton and 

Newnam and els where [purchased of him the said Walter 

Bonham erased] as followeth. 

Imprimis A deed of bargaine and sale from Walter Bonham to 

Richard Chapman alias Hiscox with a feoffment thereuppon the deed 

bearinge date the fif te daye of Aprile in the xx**" yeare of our late 

sovereigne ladie Queene Elizabeth (1578) and the feoffment the 8th of 

April with a fynne from the said Bonham and Marie his wyffe and a 

statute of cccc" and a defeasance thereof and a bond of cccc" for keap- 

inge of the coven auntes of the said bargaine and salle. 

A counterpaine of a lease graunted by Richard Hiscox to John 
Bangavile. / and xix'^" powles of auncient conveyaunces concerninge the 
premisses. 

All which writinges are delivered over unto the handes of Daniell 
Francklyn of Venny Sutton aforesayd gent, to be by him safely kept 
to the use of the right heires of the above named Richard Hiscox in 
the presence of these who names are here under written./ Yeaven this 
xviij^'' daye of Januarie in the vij*^ yeare of the reigne of our 
sovereigne lord Kinge James of England Fraunce and Yreland, and of 
Scotland the xliij^V 1609, 

by me Daniel Francklyn. 
John Hitchcock. 
John Bartlett. 
Thomas Mason. 
John x Hyntons marke. 
Endorsed Wiltes. de uno messuagio. 



The Society s MSS. 41 

To advise on this deede whether a fyne without a recovery will barr 
the entaile. 

To enquire of Hiscox whether Richard on whom the landes was 
entayled was the heire att lawe. 

JVo. 68. 



GiuNDON, Frome Woodlands. 

77. 

Indenture of demise by Edward, prior of Maydenebradelegh, and ^the 
convent of the same, to John Brugges of Frome, and Alice his wife, of 
their lands, etc. in Granden, for the term of their lives at 53.s. 4(1. rent ; 
they are to be collectors of the prior's rents of the tenants of Grandon 
and Frome Wodeland and to account therefore ; they are to levy the 
amercements of the prior's court of Grandon, &c. Maydenebradelegh, 
Sunday after St. John before the Latin Gate, 7 Richard II. 

Endoy^sed Grandon juxta Frome. 

No. 69. 



Upton Lovell. 

78. 
Henry, bishop of Salisbury, to Thomas Hunter, esq., patron of the 
rectory and parish church of Upton Lovell, co. Wilts, diocese of Sarum, 
or any other having right and interest in that behalf, greeting ; whereas 
by the deprivation of Christopher Darlinge, clerk, the last incumbent, 
the said church became void, tkc. lic-mce to Hunter as patron to jjresent. 
24 July, 1599. 

Thomas Sadler, registrar. 

No. 70. 

With this document we reach the end of that collection of 
seventy documents presented by Miss Hughes to the Society in 
the first year of its existence. 



42 



KNAP HILL CAMP.i 
By Mks. M. E. Cunnington. 

Knap Hill is a bold conical-shaped hill, one of the series of 
promontories standing out from the chalk plateau that borders the 
Pewsey Yale to the north. On the south side overlooking the 
valley the hill is very steep and descends in one continuous slope 
from the summit to the level of the valley below. On the north 
and west it slopes more gradually back to meet the level of the 
downs that spread out behind it. On the east it is connected with 
Golden Ball Hill by a comparatively level, triangular-shaped neck 
of land. The next promontory to the west is Walker's Hill, on 
the summit of which is the Long Barrow known as "Adam's 
Grave." On Walker's Hill and on the neighbouring downs are to 
be seen several ancient banks and ditches, barrows, and other 
evidences of ancient populations. The ploughed land on Golden 
Ball Hill is strewn with flint Hakes, broken implements, hammer 
stones, cores, &c., bearing eviderce of an ancient occupation of the 
site. 

Between Knap and Walker's Hill an ancient roadway, known 
as the British Trackway, or the Eidgeway, ascends from the valley 
at Alton, at first as a deeply sunken way, and continues its course 
northwards across the downs towards Kennet.^ 



^ "Knap," a variety of " knob," Danish. A protuberance or round isolated 
hill; a hill or summit, Lloyd's Encydopcedic Dictionary. "You shall see 
many a fine seat set upon a knap of ground." As used in Wilts, A Little 
Hill, A Steep Ascent in a road, see " Glossary," Wilts Arch. Mag.^ vol. xxvii., 
p. 137. 

The excavations at Knap Hill were carried out by Mr. and Mrs. B. H. 
Cunnington during the summers of 1908 and 1909. The work altogether 
occupied six weeks, six men being employed. 

2 See " Antiquities of North Wilts,'' by the Kev. A C. Smith. On the 
Ordnance Maps this way is marked as a " Roman Road " and called the 
Ridgeway, or Icknield Way. 



Knap Hill GamiJ. 43 

Sir Eichard Colt Hoare mentions two barrows in the camp on 
Knap Hill; the more easterly of the two has since l)een destroyed 
by flint diggers, and nothing is known of its contents.^ The other 
one to the west is still in existence, and was opened by Dr. Thurnani 
between 1853 and 1857. He found in the centre a circular cist 
in the chalk rock, 2ft. in diameter and l^ft. deep, nearly full of 
burnt bones and ashes, but without any other relic."-^ 

Outside the camp to the soutli-west,on the steep side of the hill, i& 
a low artificial mound, described by Sir 11. Colt Hoare as a " very 
low bowl-shaped barrow, with ditch, diameter about 16 yards." 
Dr. Thurnam examined it and found no sign of any interment, and 
only a few bones of animals near the top.'^ The position of this 
mound on such a very steep hillside seems rather an unusual one 
for a barrow, and perhaps it was not one at all, but a mound in 
some way connected with the defences of the camp on this side. 

The nearest spring of water is now about a mile distant from 
the camp, at Alton, but as the water-level seems to have been 
higher in prehistoric times, the water may then have come to the 
surface nearer to the foot of the hill. 

The excavations were originally undertaken for the purpose of 
ascertaining, if possible, the period to which the entrenchment on 
Knap Hill belongs, but in the course of the work a second and 
later enclosure was found adjoining the old hill camp, and this 
made the undertaking more difficult and complicated than it would 
otherwise have been.-^ 

The Old, ok Hill Camp. 

The main defence of the old camp on Knap Hill consists of a 
single rampart and ditch drawn round the weak side of the position 
where the hill abuts on to the open downs. On the eastern side, 



' Ancient Wilts, North, pj). 11, 12. 
'^ Wilts Arch. Jf'i(/., vol. vi., ]). 327. 

* Sir 11. Colt lloarc remarks that jiid^^iui,^ troui tlit^ worn state of its 
'ami)ai'ts he would concliuU^ Knap Hill to be of high anticpiity (/l/uvr//^ 
Wilts, N(jrfh). Ntuther he nor anyone else seems to have suspected the 

&xist<.'iUT of the adjniiiinij; plateau cnclosurf. 



44 



Knap Sill Gamp. 



0/ 












<f^ 






\ uj I 



:^ 










< 

Z 









•■••*f 



»,j„,;a«'«'*\ 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington. 



45 



facing the plateau, there is no ditch, but there are sHght traces of 
a rampart, and the slope between the rampart and the plateau 
appears to have been artificially steepened, and for the first fifty feet 
from the end of the ditch this bank was cut back into a deep scarp, 
as shown on the Plan, B — B, and in Section B. This scarp is now 
entirely filled up level with the rest of the bank, and there is no 
evidence of it on tlie surface. 




Section B. 

On the south-western side the entrenchment ends abruptly at 
that point where the hill becomes steep and the descent un- 
interrupted from the summit to the level of the plain below. 
From this point along the south side there is no evidence of any 
defence except that afforded by the natural steepness of the hilb 
but on the extreme south-eastern corner, where the hill swells out 
and forms a spur or shoulder, there are two short sections of ditch 
and traces of a slight rampart above them. (S S on plan.) 

Emerging from this rampart, and having the appearance of being 
a continuation of it, a slight bank follows round the curve of the 
hill for a short distance ; it then turns down and in a straight line 
Idescends the very steepest part of tlie hill, the last few yards being 
almost ])recipitous. It ends at tlu^, foot of the hill, iind if it eviM- 
continuiMl over the level ground beyond all trace of it has now 



t 



46 Knap Hill Gamp. 

been ploughed out. At its best the bank is less than a foot high 
and has no ditch. At close quarters it requires care to trace out 
its course, but at a little distance it shows up plainly. From the 
road up Alton Hill it can be seen well, and looks like a wide cart 
track, and locally is known as the " Devil's Trackway." Our 
labourers knew it well by sight, but appeared to think it a kind 
of optical delusion that vanished at close quarters, and were much 
interested when the actual bank was pointed out to them. 

It was suggested that the bank might be merely the result of 
levelling to make a pathway, possibly down to the nearest water, 
but the hill is so steep at this point as to make this very improbable, 
if not indeed impracticable.^ 

The ditch of the main entrenchment has become silted up level, 
and the rampart is much worn down with several gaps or openings 
through it. It was thought that, as often happens on ancient 
banks, some of these gaps were due to cattle tracks, or had been 
made for agricultural purposes. 

There was, however, a certain regularity about them, and it was 
•difficult to see why on such an isolated spot so many tracks should 
have been made. The difficulty of accounting satisfactorily for 
these breaks in the rampart and for the ridges corresponding to 
them that were noticeable on the surface of the silted-in ditch 
suggested excavation at these points, and led to the discovery of 
a remarkable feature which appears not to have been observed 
before in prehistoric fortifications in Britain. 

It was found that the ditch, instead of being continuous, is cut 
into short and irregular sections divided by portions of unexcavated 
ground, forming apparently gangways or causeways leading into 
the camp. Ttiese causeways are in every case opposite a gap in 
the rampart, clearly showing that these gaps are not the result of 
any accidental circumstance, but that they, with the causeways, 
form a part of the original construction of the camp. Thus the 
entrenchment, consisting of the rampart and ditch, instead of being 
continuous, except for what might be deemed reasonable provision 

' This possibly may be a comparatively modern boundary bank, of which 
the remnant of the old rampart is the starting point. 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington. 47 

for ingress and egress, is broken up into short and irregular sections. 
The ditch of the main entrenchment is divided into seven sections. 
The unexcavated portions forming the causeways between each 
section are of a uniform length of 18ft., although the various sections 
of the ditch vary considerably. T!ie first section from the west 
is 46ft. in length ; the second, 92ft. ; the third, 121ft. ; the fourth, 
|98ft.; the fifth, 98ft.; the sixth, 122ft.; the seventh, 42ft. 

The isolated portions of ditch on the south-eastern shoulder of 
the hill are divided into two sections by a causeway of the usual 
width of 18ft., the two sections measuring in length respectively 
6oft. and 45ft. (S S on plan.) 

It is very difficult to see why the frequent openings in the en- 
trenchment should have been left, when apparently they must 
weaken it so materially, if it was intended for purposes of defence, 
either for men or cattle. 

It has been suggested, by way of explanation, that the work of 
fortification was never finished, that the ditch was being dug 
and the rampart piled up by gangs of men working in sections, and 
that for some reason the work was abandoned before the various 
sections were completed, with the result now to be seen. 

There is, however, considerable evidence in favour of these cause- 
ways being an intentional feature of the original design of the 
amp. It is improbable that on the isolated shoulder, as well as 
in the main entrenchment, the causeway should have been left 
liccidentally as tlie result of an unfinished undertaking. In every 
3ase the causeways are cut at a slight skew to the corresponding 
^ap in tlie rampart, so that standing on, or just outside the cause- 
vay, only an obli(|uo view could be obtained into the camp. A 
jline drawn through the gaps and out across the causeways indicates 
)n the plan in whicli direction in each case the skew lies. The 
miform widlli of the causeways also affords some proof of design. 
It has also been suggested that as General ritt-Iiivers thought 
f the wi(l(^ ilanlving ramparts of \Vinl<lobury Camp (Mtjcavatioiis, 
I., 2."54), lli(! (Mustuvays were inlcndctl in cases of emergency to 
dmit a large nunibcji- of cattle as rapidly as ])0ssible to the interior 
f the cam]). l)iit il would certainly be (\asiiM\aiul lluM-cfoi'(> ([iiickcr- 



48 Kna-p Hill Camjp. 

to drive a number of cattle through one or two wide openings than 
over half-a-dozen such narrow bridges as these. 

It is, then impracticable to regard these breaks in the entrench- 
ment as due to an unfinished undertaking, or as entrances in any 
ordinary sense, and the only other feasible theory seems to be that 
they had some distinct purpose in the scheme of defence ; that 
they were, indeed, a strengthening and not a weakening factor in 
this seemingly not very strongly-defended place. 

The causeways may have been left as platforms from which to 
enfilade the ditch, the defenders being stationed -upon them for 
that purpose. The distance from one causeway to another is not 
greater than would be within reach of hand-thrown missiles. Any 
determined attempt to scale the stockade with which the rampart 
was presumably strengthened could probably have been more 
effectually prevented from the causeway than if the defenders were 
themselves shut up behind the stockade, or forced to come out 
from some more distant entrance at risk of having their own retreat 
cut off. These causeways would have been, in fact, sally ports 
admirably adapted for defence of the ditch. 

From one of the gangways (the fourth counting from the west) 
there is a low bank leading down the hill towards what is believed 
to be the old roadway leading to the camp ; this bank can be traced 
for about fifty yards ; it has no ditch and is less than a foot in 
height. 

With the exception of this bank there is nothing to differentiate 
the gangways, and no sign of a beaten track leading to either of 
them. 

There is a trackway leading up the eastern side of the hill, now 
used as the road to Golden Ball Hill. The way is much worn into 
more than one track, and it is probable that this was the ancient road 
leading to both the old hill camp, and to the later plateau enclosure. 
It is thought that the main entrance to the old camp was on 
this eastern side of the hill to which the trackway leads, as well 
as that of the plateau enclosure, but the features of the entrance^ ' 
to the old camp have been obscured, if not entirely obliterated, by 
the later people. 



By Mrs. M. E. Citnnington. 49 

The Plateau Enclosure. 

T!ie plan shows an irregular-shaped enclosure to the east of the 
old camp, occupying the neck of land between Knap and Golden 
Ball Hill. Excavation proved this to be a settlement quite distinct 
from, and of considerably later date, than the old hill camp which 
it so closely adjoins. 

This plateau enclosure was bounded by a ditch and slight ram- 
part, or bank, but, judging by the size of the ditch, this bank could 
never have been very high, and only slight traces of it now remain. 
The ditch has become entirely silted up, and for fully three-quarters- 
of its length no sign of it can be detected on the surface, and its 
existence could only be proved by cutting sections every few yards 
across its probable course. It was found to have been neatly cut 
to a depth varying from four to five feet, and to a width of about 
eight feet at the top, and not exceeding eighteen inches at the 
bottom. 

The entrance to the enclosure was on the eastern side, and the 
ends of the ditch were found on either side of it ; on the south 
side of the entrance the ditch was fully five feet deep, but for the 
last few feet on the northern side it shallowed up to two feet, and 
the bottom widened out to three feet in breadth. This ditch as a 
whole appears too slight to have been intended for defence, but 
was apparently more in the nature of a boundary ditch. 

That the plateau enclosure is considerably later in date than the 
old liill camp was shown not only by the entirely different character 
of the pottery, but also by the excavations at the point of inter- 
section of the two ditches, which clearly showed that the plateau 
ditch had been cut through the silt that already filled the older 
ditch. 

It will be understood that now both ditches have silted up quite 
full, but that as the silted material varied in the two ditches, the 
outline of the smaller and later ditch could be clearly traced 
through the larger ditch which it intersected nearly at right angles 
(Section D). The chalk silt in the older ditch was purer and whiter 
than that of the later, which was more mixed with mould and 
consequently darker in colour. 
'VOL. XXXVIL — NO. CXV. B. 

i 



50 



Knap Hill Gamp. 




{. S' ( (. ^ f- f- (■ ,- C' r- ^ ^- ^ J- r fv ^- i- 



Section D. 

A— Surface. B— Darker silt of plateau ditch. C— Silt Of old hill camp ditch. 
D— Undisturbed Chalk. 

It will be seen that the plateau ditch comes to an end a few 
yards beyond its intersection with the old ditch, and that the other 
end of the plateau ditch disappears into the upper edge of the 
scarp. It is hardly possible that there could have been an entrance 
to the plateau enclosure between these two ends of the ditch be- 
cause of the steepness of the bank at this spot, and why the ditch 
should terminate like this, and what took its place as a boundary 
between these two ends, there is nothing to show. 

The difference in the pottery found in connection with the old 
€amp and that from the plateau enclosure is very marked. The 
former is of the rudest description, freely mixed with large grains 
of flint, badly baked, hand-made, soft, and friable. It was found 
associated with patches of flint chips in the ditch, showing that 
the people who used this pottery also used flint for their tools and 
weapons, if indeed they were not actually in the Neolithic stage 
of culture.^ (See relic tables below.) 

On the other hand the pottery found in the plateau ditch and 
under the plateau rampart is all well made, well baked, wheel- 
turned pottery, of a type known as that of the " bead rim bowl." 
Quantities of identical pottery have been found elsewhere in the 



^ Pottery of this type was found in the ditch of the main entrenchment 
on the bottom of one of the isolated sections of the ditch on the shoulder of 
the hill at S.S. ; on the floor of the scarp at B.B. ; and in the two pits 
underneath the long mound on the plateau, at P.P. 



i 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington. 51 

neighboiirhood, and it belongs without doubt to the latter part of 
the Late Celtic, or even to the early years of the Komano-British 
period. There is evidence that at Knap, as elsewhere, this native 
type of ware gave place in time to pottery characteristic of the 
Eoman occupation, and within and about the plateau enclosure 
pottery and other relics of this later period were found, proving 
that the site continued to be occupied during the Romano-British 
period, {tiee relic tables below.) 

The Mounds in the Plateau Enclosure. 

Within the area of the plateau enclosui-e there is a long artificial 
bank or mound, that has sometimes been taken to be a long barrow. 

Adjoining this bank at the east end is a circular mound that has 
also sometimes been mistaken for a barrow. 

For what purpose these mounds were raised is not clear, unless 
indeed it was solely for protection. The situation is a very exposed 
one, open to the north, and this bank would undoubtedly afford 
considerable shelter, and no one knowing the situation could doubt 
that any shelter from the winter winds as they blew across the 
downs would be most grateful. Mr. Hadrian AUcroft mentions a 
<ionsiderable vallum of earth, put up apparently only to serve as a 
wind screen, along the western side of huts at Trewartha Marsh, 
Launceston {Earthiuork of England, p. 206, note 3). 

The western end of the long mound rests on the silted-in ditch 
of the old hill camp, so clearly this mound is of much later date 
than the old camp. In a section cut across the neck of the bank 
■over the surface of the old ditch, nine fragments of pottery of the 
bead rim bowl type were found, and a roundel of grey pottery ; in 
addition to these were two small pieces of the thin red quality of 
Koman pottery, and two pieces of thick pottery similar to that of 
the large vessels found with Eoman pottery in the two fire holes. 

This shows that the bank must have been thrown up at some 
time during or after the Itoman period, probably the former. 

On the surface it looks as if the mound at the east end had been 
added to the original length of the long mound, but excavation 
revealed no evidence of tliis having been actually the case. 

D 



52 



Knap Hill Camp. 



While the long mound was built of ordinarily fine chalk rubble, 
the round one was found to have been entirely built up^of larga 
lumps of chalk loosely piled together. Immediately under the 
centre of this mound, at a depth of 5ft. Sin. from the surface, a 
circular fire hole was found in what appears to be an old turf 
line. In the fire hole was a quantity of wood ashes, and in and 
around it pottery, some of which is unquestionably Eoman.^ It 
will be seen in the section that this did not rest on undisturbed 
ground, but that a circular excavation had been made, filled in,, 
and apparently covered with turf at some period before that, when, 
the first hole was made (Section C). 







Section C. 



C 
E 



A— Surface. B— Large lumps of chalk, forming' mound. C— Old Excavation. D— Fireplace. 
E— Undisturbed Chalk. 

The pottery found in and around the fire place is certainly 
Eoman, but when or why the great heap of chalk was piled over 
it, or when or why the original excavation was made, there'was 
no evidence to show. 

A section was also cut across the long mound at D in the hope 
of finding additional evidence as to the age of the mound. On the 
old turf line and in the material of the mound nine pieces of pottery 
were found that may be either Eomano-British or Late Celtic. 

Here an interesting discovery was made of two circular holes or 

pits that had been dug out below the old ground level before the 

^ Fragments were found of certainly ten, and perhaps eleven vessels, in- 
cluding five pieces of Samian ware, representing at least two vessels, and 
pieces of rims of two very large pans resembling in shape a modern bread 
pan, of thick red pottery, stained on the outside to a light brown or buff 
colour, with a lattice pattern tooled over the surface ; they are too im- 
perfect for measurement, but the bodies could scarcely have been less than 
20in. in diameter. Pieces of a similar pan were found in the T-shaped 
fire place on the dais. 



i 



By Mrs. M. E. Cannington. 53 

mound was raised. Tliey were side by side and only separated 
from each other by a wall of unexcavated chalk about a foot thick 
The two pits were as nearly as possible identical in size and shape, 
roughly circular, with a diameter of 3-Jft. to 4ft., and 2ft. deep in 
tlie chalk. 

On the bottom of pit 1 were some fragments of bone, a sharp 
flint flake, and nine small sherds of coarse hand-made pottery, 
including a piece of rim ornamented with incised lines. 

In pit 2 were five fragments of the same kind of pottery, in- 
cluding three pieces of rim decorated with a series of thumb-nail 
incisions, three sharp flint flakes, and four pieces of rib bones of 
the size of those of a small ox. 

From the nature of the pottery and the flint flakes found in 
them, there can be little doubt that these pits were contemporary 
with the old hill camp, and that it was merely an accident that 
tlie later mound happened to be thrown up over them. 

Tlie surface of the plateau enclosure has been a good deal levelled 
at some time and a quantity of soil has been removed from one 
side, leaving now a kind of dais, or raised platform, rectangular in 
form {sec plan). Whether the ground was dug away for the pur- 
pose of leaving this raised dais, or whether it is the accidental 
result of digging material with which to build the mounds and 
rampart, it is difficult to say, but the regularity of the shape of 
tlie dais suggests that this raised place was left intentionally. 

A T-shaped fireplace, or hypocaust, was uncovered in the centre 
of the dais. It measured 5ft. one way and 4ft. the other, and the 
trench was 18in. in width ; it had been neatly cut 1ft. deep into the 
chalk, so that with the 18in. of surface accumulation above, the 
total depth, as excavated, was 2Ht. The chalk sides of the fireplace 
were burnt and blackened, and it was full of charred wood and 
ashes, among whicli lay the following objects : — 

The lower stone of a quern of millstone grit. This stone lay on 
the bottom of the fireplace with ashes and charcoal adhering 
to it, and was so splintered and cracked by heat that it fell 
to pieces as soon as it was touched. 

Four large iron nails, the largest 6in., the shortest 4^ in. in lengtli 



54 



Kna/p Hill Camp. 



Fragments of a deep dish or bowl, with flanged rim, of grey 
ware painted black, with wide lattice pattern tooled on the 
outside. Upchurch (?) ware. 

Piece of mortarium of grey ware painted buff colour. 

Fragments of a vessel of the thin red quality ware. 

Part of a large vessel of thick pinkish red pottery, 

painted a buff colour on the outside with a faintly- 4.^^^v 
tooled lattice decoration. 

Pieces of two similar pans were found in the fireplace 
under the round mound {see page 52). 

Pieces of coarse grey pottery. 

One small piece of Samian ware. 

Two roundels of grey pottery : diameter, l:|in. 

The contents of this fireplace are interesting as they 
certainly suggest a catastrophe of some kind. The 
quernstone, the large iron building nails, and the several 
kinds of pottery are not likely to have got into the 
fireplace in the ordinary course of domestic events. The 
fireplace could never have been cleared out again after 
these things fell into it, when, as the condition of the 
quernstone shows, there must have been a fierce heat. 
This is suggestive of a conflagration and the desertion 
of the site afterwards. 

If such a catastrophe did indeed take place, the 
discovery of a sixth century Saxon sword may be con- 
sidered as affording a possible clue to the date and cause 
of the occurrence. The sword was found 18in. deep 
in surface accumulation on the northern fringe of the 
long mound within the plateau enclosure, at G-. Nothing 
was found with it, and no trace could be detected either 
of a scabbard or of a grip of wood or other material. 

The sword was identified by Mr, Eeginald Smith at 
the British Museum, who pronounced it to be a fine, 
well-made example of the period. It is of iron and 
measures 35 inches in total length, including the tang 
of the handle, which is 5 J inches long ; the widest part 
of the blade is 2\ inches in breadth. 



By itrs. M. E. Cuniiington. 55 

The Seventeenth Century Occupation. 

After that of the Komano-British, there is no evidence of the 
occupation of the site until more than a thousand years later, when 
some seventeenth century folk seem to have taken up their quarters 
here. These people appear to have smoked a good deal of tobacco^ 
and fortunately their clay pipes, although brittle, are as inde- 
structible as pottery itself. Some of these pipes bear the stamps 
of Bristol makers, whose dates are known, and it is, therefore, 
possible to date this latest occupation of the spot with more accuracy 
and certainty than could be done from the remains of the pottery 
alone, which, however, it may be interesting to add, was independ- 
ently pronounced to be of the seventeenth century. {See relie 
tables at end.) 

Judging by the distribution of their pottery and tobacco pipes, 
these people lived on a much smaller area than the people of Roman 
times, and chose the one most sheltered spot they could find 
without altogether going off the hill. The seventeenth century 
pottery and tobacco pipes were almost entirely restricted to the 
surface of the dais and the strip of ground adjoining, between the 
dais and the long mound. The surface mould on the dais was 
exceptionally deep, and measured with the turf about lift, in 
thickness. Roman and seventeenth century relics were mixed in 
the mould below the turf in complete confusion. To give one 
example — a pipe stem was found sticking out of the side of one of 
the cuttings, and a piece of Samian ware immediately below it. 

The only explanation of this greater depth of soil, and of the 
confusion of the relics of such widely-separated periods, seems to 
be that the dais was under cultivation by the seventeenth century 
people. In this way the older relics that had been lying in, or 
just under, the turf, would naturally get dug into the soil to the 
same depth as tlie pipes and other debris scattered by the latest 
people who dug the ground. 

Wedged in the corner between the long mound and the dais are 
the foundations of a small rectangular building 23ft. long by loUt. 
wide. The only parts of the walls now remaining are roughly 
built of squarish blocks of chalk, not cut with any regularity, but 



56 



Knap Hill Camp, 



generally rather thicker than, but about the same length, as an 
ordinary brick. In the thickness of the walls at irregular intervals 
of from 2Jft. to 4-Jft. post-holes were found. Probably the walls 
were of timber, or of mud and timber, supported by these upright 
posts. No hearth or signs of flooring were found. Immediately 
outside this building there was a heap of rubbish composed of 
lumps of chalk similar to those in the walls, a few pieces of sarsen 
:Stone, and a few pieces of modern brick- Under this heap was 
part of a dish of yellow glazed seventeenth century ware. It is 
probable that these foundations are those of the house, or hut, 
inhabited by the seventeenth century folk, and that they partly 
destroyed it, perhaps for the sake of the timber, when they de- 
serted it. 

Adjoining the rampart on the south side of the plateau enclosure 
were the rectangular outlines of what seems to have been another 
building or enclosure of some kind. These foundations were more 
decayed than those in the corner by the dais, and consisted of a 
turfy bank under which were a few laid blocks of chalk. 

Koman pottery was found under the foundations, and in the 
turf within the walls, with a few small fragments of seven- 
teenth century ware. At the time these walls were laid the 
rampart of the plateau enclosure, on which they rest, must have 
been already in its present ruined state, but whether they date 
from the seventeenth century, or earlier, is uncertain. 

The seventeenth century people must have destroyed much, 
valuable evidence of the earlier occupations, and in this light itj 
-can only be regarded as a misfortune that they should have chosen- 
this site to live upon. It seems a little curious that they should 
have chosen such an exposed and waterless spot ; they were per- 
haps squatters, or shepherds, who only came here for the summer 
months. 



General Conclusions. 
The Old Hill Camp. 

There seems little room for doubt that the old hill camp at 
Xnap is of very great antiquity. That it had been abandoned, 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington. 57 

and that the ditcli liad already been silted up quite full before the 
plateau enclosure was made is proved by the intersection of the 
older ditch by that of the plateau enclosure (p. 49). 

The different character of the pottery and other relics found in 
the two ditches also affords independent evidence that the two 
works belong to different periods. 

The pottery and other relics found on the floor of the older 
ditch cannot be of a later date than the Bronze Age, audit is quite 
likely that they are Neolithic. Until some distinguishing char- 
acteristic is recognised between undecorated pottery of the Bronze 
and Neolithic periods in Britain, if indeed there be any such 
characteristic, it is impossible to form an opinion as to which 
period the pottery belongs.^ Nothing definitely characteristic 
of the Bronze Age was found, and nothing, as far as is at present 
known, incompatible with the earlier period. 

The Plateau Enclosure, and after. 

The date of tlie plateau enclosure is certainly not earlier than 
tlie Early Iron Age. A considerable quantity of wheel-turned 
pottery with bead rims, precisely similar to that found in the 
Late-Celtic rubbish heap at Oare, barely four miles away, was 
found beneath the rampart." 

Fragments of the same kind of pottery were found in several 
places at the bottom of the ditch, but no pottery or other relic 
that is at all Koman in character was found under the rampart or 
deeper than eighteen inches in the ditch. A quantity of pottery, 

^The valuable paper by Mr. Reginald Smith on " The Development of 
Neolithic Pottery," in Arckceologia^vo]. lxii.,1910, does not help in this case, 
as the i)ottery is not ornamented avid only fragmentary. The straight rim 
pieces, and the ({uality of the ware found at Knap, are practically indis- 
tinguishable from the fragments found in the chamber of the long barrow 
at Lanliill, and from some bronze age pottery. It is true that the ware 
from Lanliill was mixed with pounded fossil shells, and not with flint as at 
Knap, but that was no doubt merely a matter of local convenience. For 
account of the Lanhill barrow see Wilts Arch. Mag., vol. xxvi., p. 300. 

"" Notes on a Late-Celtic Rubbish Heap near Oare," Wilts Arch. Mag., 
vol. xxxvi., p. 125. 



58 Knap Hill Camp. 

however, that undoubtedly belongs to the period of the Eoman 
occupation, inchiding stamped Samian ware of the 2nd century 
A.D., was found superficially over the plateau and eastern side of 
the hill, as well as in the T-shaped fire place, and under the round 
mound, within the enclosure. 

The evidence, therefore, seems to prove that the plateau en- 
closure was made and occupied by people using Late-Celtic pottery 
before the Roman conquest, or at least before it had affected the 
style of their domestic wares. 

This does not, of course, necessarily mean any break in the 
occupation of the site between the pre-Roman builders of the 
enclosure and the later people living under Roman influence. 

It is probable, indeed, that the one followed the other naturally 
in the course of time without any marked interruption. It 
appears, however, that the plateau ditch had been allowed to 
partially silt up before the new-fashioned Roman pottery had 
come into use at this place. Judging from the quantity of pot- 
sherds scattered all over the ground the site was occupied for a 
long time, very probably all through the Roman period, and after 
it up to the 6th century. 

It is probable that at that date the place ceased to be occupied^ 
and there is some little evidence that the habitations were 
destroyed by fire. 

The 6th century Saxon sword found on the spot may well 
supply a clue to the date and cause of this destruction. 

There is no evidence of any later habitation of the site until 
more than a thousand years afterwards, when some 17th century 
herdsmen or squatters chose this windy and waterless spot for 
their habitation. 

Outside the northern corner of the Old Camp is an artificial 
mound which it was thought might prove to be a barrow. A 
section 5ft. wide was cut through it and then widened out to include 
the whole of the central part of the mound, down to the undis- 
turbed chalk. 

A few fragments of pottery of Roman date were found in the 
turf, but below this, unfortunately, not a single piece of pottery, or 



By Mrs. III. E. Cunniwjton. 



59 



sign of any interment, or relic of any kind could be found. From 
the fact tliat pottery of the Roman period was found in the turf, 
and nothing below it, it would appear that tlie mound was made 
before that time. 

Immediately under the turf in the centre of the mound a curious 
discovery of an incomplete skeleton was made. The body had 
been placed face downwards, witli the left arm doulded under it, 
and the right stretched out by its side. All the bones of the two 
legs and of the feet were missing, as well as those of the 
right hand. The skull, the bones of the body, and those of the 
two arms, with the exception of the right hand, were all in their 
natural order and appeared to have been quite undisturbed. The 
two femurs had gone, leaving the sockets in the pelvic bones un- 
damaged, and the tibia and fibula of the right arm were also 
undisturbed. 

As the skeleton was only covered by the turf it must have had 
a very scant burial, and possibly the missing bones had been 
scratched out by burrowing animals. 




(■ (• ,. (• ' 
Section A.— Knap Hill Camp. 

A— Surface. B— Rampart. C— Ditch. D— Undisturbed Chalk. 

'I'liK Cuttings. 
Cuttings were made to ])r()V(^ each of the causeways in the main 
cntitMK Inncnl, and the iMids of all the sections of the ditch were 

found. 

Cuttings wcro inad(» at intcrx'als aloiii: IIk^ baidv adjoiiiini: the 
plateau \n |)in\(> the (h'scont inuaiiee of the dit(di, and t Ins h'd to 
the diseo\-ei-y d' I he scaipeil hanl^ \\.\). 

Cut tings \\(M'e made at iiit('r\als on the southiMii slopi^ uf lh(^ 
lull to set> it" any traces dt' defence, such as a dil(di or («f stoid^adiiig 



60 Knap Hill Camp, 

could be found, and this led to the discovery of the ditch sections 
on the shoulder at S.S. 

The turf was cleared off the second causeway, counting from 
the west, and the ground searched for signs of gate or other post 
lioles. 

The third causeway was also searched for post holes. 

A length of 54f b. was cleared out of the second section from the 
west of the ditch of the main entrenchment. The ditch was 
found to have been very irregularly cut ; in places its floor was 
level, in others very uneven with steps and ledges of unhewn 
chalk. Forty-two feet from the western end of the section the 
ditch was 5|ft. deep, and 5ft. wide at the bottom. At the west 
end of the section it was 7ft. deep, and 10ft. wide at the bottom, 
with almost perpendicular walls. At the east end of the same 
section it was 8ft. deep, and only 18in. wide at the bottom. 

Two cuttings were made through the sections of the ditch on 
the shoulder of the hill at S.S. It was found to be a smaller 
ditch than that of the main entrenchment ; it was 4Jft. in depth, 
and 3ft. in width at the bottom. 

The plateau ditch was cleared out from X, through its inter- 
section with the older ditch, to its termination ; and from XI to 
its disappearance at the edge of the scarp. The ends of the ditch 
on either side of the entrance to the plateau enclosure were also 
cleared out from X2 and X:l Cuttings were made every few 
yards across the whole length of this ditch to trace its course, and 
in twelve of these cuttings, from 4ft. to 6ft. wide, it was opened 
to the bottom. 

The " dais " was trenched all over, and trenches were also cut 
on the surface of the plateau enclosure. 

Cuttings were made through the mounds on the plateau (see 
page 51), and the hut foundations at E and E were examined. 

Eelics from the Ditch of the Old Camp. 

A few fragments of coarse hand-made pottery,^ flint flakes, and 

1 Some fragments of the thin " drinking cup " type of pottery ornamented 
Avith oblong punch marks were found on the surface of this ditch. 



I 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunning ton. 61 

pieces of sarsen stone, burnt flints, fragments of bones of animals, 
including the jaw bone of a pig (4ft. deep), and fragments of ant- 
lers of red deer, were found scattered all tbrougli the silt of the 
ditch. A human jaw bone, rather small, and with worn teeth, 
was found 5ft. deep, but no other human bones. 

The majority of the finds were in groups within a foot or so of 
the bottom of the ditch. At one spot seventy-two flint chips were 
found ('Gft. deep) all within the space of a foot or so. 

In a similar group were found forty-four flint chips, a round 
hammer stone and a core of Hint, Ijurnt flints, a sarsen chip, a 
flagmen t of pottery, and apiece of a large bone (ox ?). In another 
group were two shoulder blades of a small ox (not of the same 
individual), two flint flakes with good bulbs of percussion, other 
broken flints, and apiece of pottery ; and again a flint scraper with 
good secondary working, a rough flint hammer, and a flint core. 

The most interesting group contained some twenty fragments 
of pottery, including rim pieces (Figs. 14-15), and two bosses or lugs 
(Fig. 13), resembing those sometimes found on Bronze Age cinerary 
ums, ox bones (including one horn core) representing at least five 
individual animals ; forty flint flakes and rough pieces of flint, 
a scraper wiih. secondary working ; a nodule of brown stained flint 
that has been much used for rubbing and hammering ; a piece of 
sarsen shaped like a split pear, with chipped edges, 4|in. x 3|in. ; 
and a nodule of iron stone that has been used as a hammer. 

The bones were sent to Professor Mc Kenny Hughes who very 
kindly identified them, and pronounced them to belong to a small 
specimen of tlui Jh)^ t/fi/n's, or domestic ox. That they are cer- 
taiidy not those of the Uos lonr/ifrons is proved by the one horn core 
(Fig. 17) that fortunately was found in fair condition. This discovery 
would seem to be of consi(lt'r;il)h3 interest in connection with the 
vexed ([uestion as to the; \iiri()iis l)reeds of ox domesticated in y>vv- 
RoniMii IJril.iiii. 

Th(^ condition of llic Minis found in [\\c ditch is interesting. A 
very few of IIkmu aiv wcathtMvd (juito whiti^ liki^ surfact^ tlinls. 
These are smoolli ami Muni to l\\(' (ouch, and appear (o hax'c been 
undoubtctlly weatJicKMl ami worn Ix^'ore the}' were co\'ertHl u[) in 



62 Knap Hill Camp. 

the ditch. But by far the greater number are only a soft pale 
grey in colour, and are rough and sharp to the touch like freshly 
chipped flints. This, together with the suggestive way in which 
these chips and flakes were found together in groups or clusters, 
seems to prove that they were actually worked on the spot where 
they were found. Lying in the chalk silt they have become dis- 
coloured, but their sharp edges and roughnesses have not been 
worn down. lu some cases it appears that they were worked on 
the actual floor of the ditch, and in others after it had become 
partially filled in. The worked bone (Fig. 12) was found on the 
floor of the ditch. 

There was no sign of a fire ever having been lit on the actual 
floor of the ditch, but in two places there had been a fire after it 
had partly silted in, in one case to a depth of 4ft. and in the 
other 3ft. 

Eelics from the Plateau Ditch and Eampart. 

Fragments of the skull and limb bones of an infant were found 
imbedded in the ramparb of the plateau enclosure. 

Forty rim pieces and one hundred and sixty-three other pieces 
of bead rim bowls, were also found under this rampart on the 
old turf line, together with a particularly good specimen of 
a sarsen muller, and a piece of another one of flint. 

A much rusted iron brooch was found 2Jft. deep in the ditch of 
the plateau enclosure ; it is made out of strong iron wire, all 
in one piece, like a modern safety pin. Of Late Celtic type 
(Fig 4). It closely resembles an iron brooch found in the 
Late Celtic rubbish heap at Oare, dating from circ. 50 B.C., 
—50 A.D. 

Except fairly numerous fragments of pottery of the bead rim 
bowl type nothing else was found in the plateau ditch.^ 

Eelics from the Surface of the Plateau Enclosure. 
Not only within the plateau enclosure, but over the whole area, 
between Knap and Golden Ball Hill, the ground is thickly strewn 

^ Twenty-one pieces of bead rim bowls were found in the last foot above 
the bottom of this ditch. 




objects troin Knap Hill — I 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington. 63 

with sherds of pottery. The great majority of these are llomano- 
British or Late Celtic in character, but occasionally there occur 
fragments of coarse hand-made "Bronze Age" type, and of glazed 
modern or mediaeval ware. By means of a little search handfuls 
of such fragments may be gathered from the mole hills that are 
numerous on the spot. 

The pottery found in the various sections in and about the 
plateau enclosure includes numerous pieces of the various kinds of 
pottery that are commonly found associated with lloman remains, 
grey, black, red, cream, and Ijud', including several pieces of 
mortaria. The better quality wares of the period were represented 
I by a few fragments of New Forest, and of Castor ware with " slip " 
decoration, and forty-two pieces of Samian ware. Among this 
latter is a piece with a mending rivet-hole, a piece of a small bowl 
•of first century form (Form 27). a base of a large bowl, with an 
illegible maker's stamp, a base of a very small bowl with a 
rosette stamped on the interior, a base of a small bowl chipped out 
to form a roundel, and stamped with the maker's name SEAERIM.^ 
(Fig. 6.) 

A good many of the pieces of the Samian ware are blackened and 
•discoloured l)y fire. 

The following ol)jects were also found: — 

An iron key, 3^ in. long, lloman (Fig. 3). 

Pair of bronze tweezers, length 2\\\\., probably Eoman (Fig. 11). 

Three sarsen mullers, or pounding stones. 

Iron nails (Figs. 1-2). 

Five pieces of hones or Kliarpening stones. 

Fragments of s:nall glass vessel, unicli oxidised. Pruljably 

Itoman. 
Several ])i(^ces of Roman incised tiles and circular bricks. 
FragnitMit, of wall ilauli ' with oiio sidi^ ])()lishe(l. 

' There seem to have been several potters of this name, and there are 
several entrii-s of it in the " ('<it<ilo(fue of Roman Potteri/'' ])ublislio(l ])y the 
Britisii Museum, ImH 1 can tind no record of a staiu]) (]uite the same as this 
•ono. Mr. Ia';.,'inald Smith tells me that ''of skvkki" is in the '' CorjmSy'' 
And llial "o SKAEiu " occurs at Caervvent (with the letter v reversed as at 
Knap.) 



64 Knccp Hill Camp. 

Pieces of a coarse brick or concrete, rough on one side, smooth 
and polished on the other. Yery similar pieces were found 
in the Late Celtic rubbish heap at Oare ( Wilts Arch Mag.^ 



vol. xxxvi., p. 125). Eemains of floorin 



? 



Fifteen roundels of Eomano-British or Late Celtic pottery. All 

about one inch in diameter. 
A " roundel," or counter, made of grey ware from the base of a 

vessel with low circular pedestal. The counter (?) is 2in. square. 
A reel-shaped spindle whorl of grey pottery, made out of the 

base of a small vessel with circular foot or pedestal : diameter,. 

IJin. (Fig. 5). 
Half of another spindle whorl of grey pottery. 
Canine tooth, polished and with a hole bored through it for 

suspension. 
Small pebble that had been used for polishing or burnishing. 
Oyster shells. Iron slag. Pieces of sawn antlers of the red 

deer. 
Piece of chalk, roughly shaped and hollowed. Possibly a lamp. 

2fin. X 2in. x IJin. (Fig. 16). 
Numerous fragments of seventeenth century glazed pottery ; 

green, yellow, and marbled, representing the ordinary domestic 

pottery of the period. 
One piece of brown speckled ware of imported German stoneware^ 

of late seventeenth or early eighteenth century manufacture. 
A seventeenth century \d. token, in very fair condition : — 

GEACE . NAISH . OF . THE . = a Castle 

DEVIZES . 1652 = three cloves 
(No. 71. Williamson.) 

A number of broken stems and bowls of clay tobacco pipes. 
Three of the bowls are stamped with the name of Jeffrey 
Hunt, a known maker of tobacco pipes in the seventeenth 
century. He was admitted a freeman of the City of Bristol 
in 1651. 

Four stems are stamped Thos. Hunt. Thomas Hunt, a relation 
of the above Jeffrey Hunt, was also a known maker, and was 
admitted a freeman of the City of Bristol at the same date. 



By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington, 65 

These pipes stamped on tlie steins have sharp spurs instead 
of being flat under the bowl. 

Two bowls are stamped T. H., which possibly stands for the 
same maker. 

One bowl is stamped W. Duck, or Buck. 
All the pipes are of the same seventeenth century type. 
{See Arch. Journ., vols. 57 — 8, and Jleliqimry, vol. III.) 
Small bronze or brass finger ring ; has had a setting of some 

kind (Fig. 10). Eoman ? 
Many small fragments of very thin much oxidised glass, probably 

fragments of a square-sided phial, or phials.^ 
Two handles of seal-topped spoons of brass, tinned, seventeenth 
century ; length of handle broken off close to bowl, 3 Jin. 
(Figs. 18-19), 
Small iron spur with screw adjustment. 
Parts of three small tanged blades of table knives. Probably 

seventeenth century. 
Three iron buckles. Seventeenth century ? 
Piece of double-tooth bone comb ; one row of teeth coarser than 
the other. Poman or seventeenth century ? See Pitt-Pivers' 
Excavations, III., p. 133 (Fig. 7). 
Eound-headed bone pin, length 4|in., and parts of two others. 

Probably Poman (Figs. 8-9). 
Several pieces of broken quernstones, roe deer horn, and horn 

cores of the Bos longifrons. 
Thanks are due to Sir William Lewis Stucley, Bart., of Hart- 
land Abbey, Devon, the owner of the property, for readily 
giving his consent for the work, and for his kindness in allowing 
the " finds " to bo placed in the Society's Museum at Devizes. 

Mr. Arthur Stratton, the tenant, of Manor House, Alton Priors, 
also gav(^ his prrniission for the digging, and most kindly lent a 
sheplKM'd's hut and spared some of his own workmen for the work. 
It is felt that very cordial thanks are due to Mr. Stratton for the 
material assistance he rendered in these and many other ways. 

' We are indt^htcd to the authorities at the Uuildhall ^ruseuiu for an 

0])inion on the ilat(> of tlic luii^disli ])()ttory, and on the nature of this i^iass. 

VOL. XXXVll. — NO. CXV. F 



66 



SALISBURY IN 1455. 

{Liber Niger.) 
By the Rev. Edmund B. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 

In Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 413, was printed " A Royal Aid and 
Supply," which practically formed a Directory for the Salisbury 
of 1667. The present paper gives Salisbuiy as it was in 1455, and 
is taken from the Liber Niger of Bishop Beauchamp by the per- 
mission of A. R. Maiden, Esq., E.S.A., Diocesan Registrar. Mr. 
Maiden says that it appears from folio 74 of the Liber Niger that 
Bishop Beauchamp, who was translated to Sarum in 1450, upon 
the murder of his predecessor, Ayscough, collected in 1451, in an 
irregular manner, into several volumes, the documents of the 
greatest importance lying in his palace at Salisbury and at his 
various manors, which muniments, consisting of rolls, accounts, 
evidences, and books, were in danger of being burnt by the insurrec- 
tionary leaders, as well as of being forgotten and of perishing through 
age; and that being himself largely engaged in the affairs of the diocese 
and of the kingdom he employed certain young men in the com- 
pilation, giving such personal supervision to the work as he was able. 

The present list is called "Ren tale Civitatis Sarum de Assisis," 
folio 155, and consists of a list of the tenants of the Bishop in 
Salisbury. Besides this there are lists of tenants of the episcopal 
manors and tenants in Chardstock, Compton, Wokingham, Sonning,. 
Sherborne, Ramsbury, Potterne, and other places. 

CIVITAS NOVE SARUM. 

A.D. 1455. 

Liber Niger., folio 155. 

Nevus Vicus. 

Redditus assise ibidem Episcopo ibidem qui pro tempore fuit ut de jure 
ecclesie et ne partem et prepositis ibidem existentibus colligendo videlicet 
ad nunc per Johannem Congesby aliter dictus Johannem Noble et Robertum 
Eston prepositis ut ex antique jure dicte ecclesie et renevatus fuit in feste 



Salisbury ^'71 1455. 67 

pasche anno regni Regis Henrici Sexti XXXIIP et in dicto festo ac in festo 
sanctiMychisArchangeli annuatim colligendum et levandum utinferius patet. 
De Thomas Sawayn pro ten in Carternstret prius Johannis 

Cammell juxta le Gredire Gd. 

De eodem pro ten in occidental i parte eiusdem M. 
De eodem pro ten in novo vico in quo Willelmus Tobyn baker 

inliabitat 6d. 
De eodem pro ten ibidem nuper Johannis Kirchii 2s. fd. 
De eodem pro capitali ten ibm in quo Willmus Basket nuper 

inhabitavit 14d. 
De eodem pro shopa in le Boclierew quam Johannes Houchyn 

nuper tenuit 3d. 
De eodem pro ten in orientali parte vici de Castelstrete nuper 

Johannis Cammell 6d. 
De eodem pro ten ibm extra Barrs nuper ejusdem Johannis 

Cammell 4^d. 

De eodem pro cotagio in Culvirstrete nuper eiusdem Johannis 6fd. 

De eodem pro angulari ten cum shopis in alto vico et in novo vico 4d. 
De eodem pro ten super fossatum Civitatis in quo Johannis 

Wodehurst Senior nuper mansit 'S\d. 
De eodem pro angulari ten cum shopis vocato Duysnescorner ex 

opposito Chesecorner 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in Brounstrete quod Johannes Atkyn nuper 

tenuit l^d. 

De eodem pro angulari tenemento in Endelestrete 6d. 

Sm OS. Hid. 

De Capellano Cantarie Rogeri Chiyn pro ten nuper Thome 

Wageyn in novo vico 6fd. 

De eodem pro ten ex opposito fori vocato le Tabard 4^d, 

De eodem pro ten juxta ten predictum 4d. 

[Whetley in margin.] Sm. 15d. 

De Ikrtho Dounton pro ten in novo vico prius Johannis Ston de 

Wilton 8d. 

De Johne Upton gentilman i)ro cotagio in novo vico 5|d. 
De eodem ]n'o ten in AVynchestrcstrete super angulum nuper 

Thome Kemi)e ^d. 
De eoih-m pro tt'U ad inferiorem ])ontem de Fysshertoun nuper 

Reginaldi Glover 3id. 
De eodem pro ten nui)cT Johnis I'ljton i)atris predicti Johnis in 

Brounestrete 1.3d. 

De eodrqn ])ro Slio].;i in 15ochert'W Cj. 

De eodtiii pro cDta-io in Carterstrete i)rius Ilenrici Smyth Wd. 

De i'0(U'iii 1)10 staliir [craM'd] ex o])posito Cildaule Saruin '2d. 

Sni 5s. lo.'d 

\)v cocU'iii pro tni ad angulnni nbi carbones venduntur 2s. S^d. 

De eodem pro ten nuju'r Ini^'cbarn at I'roke in Draklialstrcte -Id. 



€8 Salisbury in 1455. 

De custode Domus Sancti Nicholai pro tern in novo vico quod 

Walterus Brown tenuit 3d. 

De eodem pro ten in Brounstrete quod Willmus Couerer baker 

modo tenuit 9d. 

[Rogerus Holesse in margin.'] De Roberto Cove pro ten in novo vico 

in quo inhabitat prius Johannis Well 7|d. 
l_In margin., relating to next three.] Cantaria Willmi Swayne 

De eodem pro capitali ten in Wynchestrestrete prius Johannis Hore 4d. 
De eodem pro shopis in occidentali parte ejusdem tenementi 5|^d. 

De eodem pro Shopis juxta Chesecorner 3|d. 

De eodem pro curtilagio et Rakkis tendentis a vico de Brounstrete 

in Vico de Gicorstrete 9^d. 
l^In margin C. Blakkar.] 
De eodem pro Shopis ad orientalem finem de Bocherew 2s. 3d, 

De eodem pro ten in quo Willmus George manet in Brounstrete 

quondam Thome Smyth 2 d. 

De eodem pro ten in parte boriali ten in quo idem Willemus manet 

in Brounstrete l^d. 

De eodem pro tenemento angulari in Wynchestrestrete et Broun- 
strete nuper Isabelle Plummer 3d. 
De eodem pro ten de chief corner ad angulum de Wynchestrestrete 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in parte orientali sui tenementi in novo vico 

vocatum Willisplace 2d. 

De eodem pro solo in quo est gardinum super Barnewel Crosse 

[now Barnard' 8 Cross] 2f . 

De eodem pro ten ex opposito gildeaule Sarum nuper Johannis 

Camyll |d. 

Sm 6s. 2|d. 

De Johanna Hunte pro ten in novo vico prius [Cecilie Mossell 

erased] Edwardi Fonteigne 3d. 

De Rico Plowman pro ten in novo vico prius Cecilie Mossell 3|d. 
De Thoma Telle pro ten in novo vico perquisite de Johanne 

Clere lymnor 5|d. 
De Johanne Bartevile taverner pro gardino in Frerynstrete 3d. 

De communario ecclesie Cathedralis Sarum pro ten decano et 

capitulo pertinente 2s. 3^d. 
De eodem ut custode altare Sancti Thome in dicta ecclesia pro 

ten prius Walteri Warwyk Vicarii ibidem 5d. 

Folio 155 dor 80. 

De clerico operis dicte ecclesie Cathedralis pro ten ex opposito 

Gilde Aule Sarum lY|d. 

De eodem pro ten ex opposito fori vocato Nuggescorner 7d . 
De eodem pro shopa et muris annexis de novo aventato (Oatmeal 

Row) 2d. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem nuper Henrici Route juxta Nuggescorner 2id. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Walteri Benet in Polatria ^ 6d. 



\ 



By the Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 69 

De eodem pro ten vuteri Florentyne corner ad fineni novi vici 20d. 

De eodem pro ten in quo Simon Bent inhabitavit S^d. 
De eodem pro angulari tenemento fundato per cantarios juxta 

ecclesiam Sancti Thome Sarum 2.s. 3d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem per cantarios fundato 7d. 

De eodem pro 8hopa juxta tenementum predictum 6d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Willelmi Donke in Endelestreete 5d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Alicie Kusteshale in novo vico et in 

Brounestrete 5|d. 
De eodem jjro ten nuper Walteri Warwik in novo vico prius 

Hugonis Gondy 3d. 

De eodem pro shopa juxta portum Clausi in qua Swotecar manet 2d. 
De eodem pro Sliopa ad fynem De Iremonger Hew in qua 

Edwardus Portecar man sit 2d. 
De eodem pro ten in Cordewanerrew in quo Joliannes Pynner 

nuper inhabitavit lOd. 
De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete juxta le Bolehalle in quo 

Johannes Groud manet 3d. 
De eodem pro ten in eodem vico juxta idem tenementum in quo 

Eicardus Pile manet Yd. 

De eodem pro ten in Gigorstrete juxta ten Eicardi Leche 3d. 
De eodem pro ten in Wynmanstrete in quo Johannes Warner manet 3d. 

De eodem pro cotagio in Mylkemongerstrete prius Eici Oword 2d. 

De eodem pro curtilagio nuper Willim Sere 2d. 
De eodem x>ro ten in Mylkemongerstrete nuper Johanne Slegge 

vidue 3d. 
Sm 12s. 4^d. 

De eodem communari ecclesic Cathedralis predicte pro cotagio 

nuper Johanne Eclielhampton juxta Castelbarres 9d. 
De eodem pro gardino in Endelstrete quod Willmus Hugyn nuper 

tenuit 2^d. 
De eodem pro ten in Vico Sancti Martini in quo Thomas Laker 

tanner modo inhabitat 6d. 
De Johanne Eussell filio Joliannis Eussel pro ten in alto vico 

vocato lo himl)e juxta })ortum clausi ibidem (Ud. 

De Scolare de Valle Scolare Sarum pro ten juxta portum i)redictum 2(1. 

De Eodem pro aliis ten suis in Mynystrestrete * 12(1. 

De eodem pro ten nn])er Henrici Baudry Qd. 
De eodem pro ])riito infra clausum canonicorum Sarum et ex 

opposito domus Sancti Nicholai 20(1. 

De eodctn pro ten nuper Jdliatiiiis Hatter in ]\Iinistrestrete l.Ul. 

De eodem i»ro U'u nuper Johannis Hemi)y in vico Sancti ^lartiui 2d. 

De eodem i)ro ten nujx-r Agnetis Orm in novo vico 4s. 
De Domino -lohnniu^ Walloj) coUector redditus vicarii ecclesic 

Catludralis Sarum ])ro ten suis in Givitate Sarum 3s. ;d. 
De eodem i>n) ten \-oeato le Hose in alto vico de .M ynstrestrete 20s. TAd- 
De eodem pro shu]>a in parte occidentali dicti tenenienti luius 

ten Johannis Toienioiid 3'.d. 



*70 Salisbury in 1455. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Johannis Gawayn in Brounstrete S^d. 

De eodem pro quantitate soli juxta ten nuper Henrici Sowthwyk 

de novo aventato 3d. 

De 
De 
De eodem pro mesuagio in novo vico nuper Cristine Lye in quo 

Eicus Gore inhabitat 3|d. 
De eodem pro ten in Yico Sancti Martini perquisito de Domino 

Johanne Bokelest et de W. lightf ote 1 3d. 
De eodem pro ten in alto vico vocato le Angel 14jd. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Simonis Milbourn in Castelstrete 5d. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico ex opposito Almyshous et in vico 

de Brounstrete 6d. 

De Johne Thursby pro ten in novo vico juxta le Crane 3d. 

De Johne Lysle milite pro ten suo vocato le Crane 3fd. 

De eodem pro ten cum taberna in eodem vico 3^d. 

De Eoberto Newman pro ten nuper Cecilie Sydenham in novo vico Id. 
Demagistro Johne Syferwast pro ten nuper Johnis Hulle car- 

pinter in Brounstrete prius Johnis Sapson l|d. 

De Willmo Lyghtefote pro ten vocato le Cheker in Endlestrete 

prius Thome Abbot 6d. 

De eodem pro ten vocato le Faucon juxta inferiorem pontem de 

Fyssherton 3|d. 

Folio 156. 

De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete vocato le Hynde 12d. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem nuper Johannis Cary 8d. 
De eodem pro curtilagio in Martin Croft prius Roberti Durant 

et postea Alicie Colyngburn 5 Jd. 

De eodem pro gardino et Kokkis in Martin Crofte 7d. 
De Eico Stille cook pro ten nuper Henrici Chubbe baker in novo 

vico 2s. 4d. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem nuper dicti Henrici 2s. Yd. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem juxta inferiorem pontem de Fysherton 3s. 

De Ancellmo Hebbyng pro ten nuper Agnetis Etsale in novo vico 2s. 

De eodem pro ten in parte orientali ejusdem tenementi 3s. 3d. 
De Willelmo Swayn pro ten in alto vico prius Johannis Paule 

fourbor 2s. 9d- 

De eodem pro ten ibidem nuper Eoberti Eedyng 2d. 
De eodem pro shopa ex opposito le Gorges Inne prius Thome 

Eandolf lid. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico nuper Eici Hayne X|d. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstrete nuper Cristine Swyfte lOjd. 

De eodem pro ten in Gigorstrete nuper perquisito De Thoma Byre 4^d. 
De eodem pro Shopa ad finem de Iremonger Eow prius ejusdem 

Thome Ifd. 
De eodem pro ten cum fabrica in alto vico in Wynchestrestrete 

nuper dicti Thome 2d. 



By the Rev. Edmund II. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 71 

De eadem pro Shopa in Oartern strete priiis predicti Thome et 

Willi Fyvian 2|d. 
De eodem pro duabus Shopis in le Bocherew nuper per^iuisito 

de Edith Okbourne 3d. 

De eodem i)ro aliis Sliopis juxta Shopam nuper Jolmis Cammell Vd. 

De eodem pro Shopa in le Potrew nuper Willmi Wilton bocher 3d. 

De eodem pro shopa nuper Roberti Play versus New Inne 3d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Clement llawlin in novo vico vocato le 

Sterr lO^d. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico nuper magistri Jolmis Oranborne Gd. 
De eodem pro duabus ( ) in australi fjarte de Cage in 

Castelstrete j)erquisito de Thoma Freeman 18d. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico in quo inliabitat 4d. 

De eodam pro ten juxta ten Thome Chapelayn lOd. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstrete nuper Aleyn Colet 5;^d. 
J )e eodem pro ten nuper Johnis Mone touker in Castelstrete et 

postea Johnis Honythoren 5|d. 
De eodem pro angulari Shopa in Vico Sancti Martini prius Rici 

Clere de Pensford 5d. 
De eodem pro ten in Gigorstrete prius Rici Gatur et postea Annes 

Janenes 1 |d. 
De eodem pro angulari ten in novo vico et Lovelane nuper 

Simonis Poye 2|d. 

De Johne Ildisle pro ten in alte vico vocato Countewalis Inne 12d. 

De Johne Wily pro ten in quo in habitat nuper Roberti Warmwell 7d. 

De eodem pro ten in Scottislane empto de Johne Wallop 3|d. 
De eodem pro ten in Scottislane nuper Roberti Leredyn juxta 

ten Thome Whityng wever 3id. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Johnis Drewey juxta Castelstrete ll^d. 
De eodem pro ten juxta cimiterium Sancte Thome Sarum nuper 

Roberti Warmwell 10 d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Rici Oword juxta ten Simonis jMilborne 12d. 
De eodem pro ten in quo Johnes Cupper dyer manet juxta Su- 

periorem pontem de Fys^i^i'ton 1^1 d. 
De eodem pro ten in alto vico cum porta (quondam Willmi 

Coventre Sid. 
De eodem ])ro ten in Cheppare strete prius Willmi Purcheyse et 

l)0stea Johnis Chitren 2d. 

De Thoma .Icnyns ])i-() lio.s))iti() suo vocato le Horshed in alto vico 3fld. 

De eodem pro ten in parte australi hospitii predicti 2fd. 

De eodem pro Slio])a super a([uam trenche currentis 6d. 

De eodem ])ro ten in Castelstrete (luondam Kiii Cliesham fuller hi. 
De Simone Milborne pro Shopa angulari in alto vico prius 

ivlmiuuli Danntesey 3d. 

De eodem ])ro alia Shopa ibidem nui)er dicti J-Miuuiuli ;'„1. 
J)e eodem pre aii-ulari t'li fx opposito fori prius Jojiaimis 

Chitti-nie i'lNI. 



72 Salisbury in 1455. 

Folio imd. 
De eodem pro alio ten ibidem in quo Johannes Mason nunc in- 

habitat 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem juxta le Counsellious 6d. 

De pro Shopa ex opposito ecclesie Sancti Thome 

nuper Johannis Cyre 2d. 

De eodem pro alia Shopa ibidem nuper Henrici Mann id. 

De eodem pro ten in Oastelstrete in parte boriali ten nuper Johnis 

Alisaunder 4d. 

De Thoma Knal pro ten super trencheam aque currentis in quo 

Edmundus Flete inhabitat in Wynchestrestrete IS^d. 
De eodem pro postis predicto tenemento pertinente 
De eodem pro cotagio cum curtilagio tendente a predicto ten in 

vico de Newstrete 5f d. 
De eodem pro cotagio in utraque parte da Colverstrete lO^d. 

De Thoma Lypracall 2|d. 

De eodem pro Shopa in novo vico ex opposito le Rose 6d. 

De eodem pro Shopa iuxta Venel super aquam Trenche Civitatis 4^d^ 
De eodem pro juxta le Pilours juxta le Colecorner 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in Carterstrete juxta ten nuper Rici Wise 2d, 

De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete in quo Johnis Toriton 

mansit 3d, 

De eodem pro Shopa in Carternstrete quas(s^c)Petrus Colermaker 

tenuit 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in quo Johnes Chipenham inhabitat in le 

Bocherew 19d. 
De eodem pro shopa in qua Johnes Wodehurst inhabitat in le 

Potrew 6d. 

De eodem pro shopa in qua Alicia Dynton nuper inhabitat ibidem 6d^ 

De eodem pro shopa in qua Ricus Fleccher inhabitat fd. 

De eodem pro ten in quo Robertus Chaundeler inhabitat in 

Wynchestrestrete juxta Barras 
De eodem pro ten nuper Rici Wise in Carterstrete ten in vico 

predicto in Brounstrete 
De eodem pro angulari ten in Winchestrestrete inter ten T Reve 

at Shopam Agnetis Lye 
De Johne Catthers pewtrer pro ten in veteri poletria perquisito 

de Roberto Okeborne 
De Johne at Bergh pro ten cum taberna in veteri poletria quon- 
dam Johnis Homes 12d. 
De eodem pro hospitio in altovico vocato le Robe 4^d, 

De eodem pro quantitate soli ibidem longitudinem xviii pedes 

et latitudinem 3 pedes 3d. 

De eodem pro parva Shopa juxta hospitium predictum super 

fossatum Civitatis 3d, 

De eodem pro gardino in Culverstrete quod Willmus Predy nuper 

tenuit 3d. 

De eodem pro ten cum gardino extra barras de Castelstrete quod 

Robertus Tarant tenet 16|d, 



By the Rev. Edmmid E. NeviU, RA., F.S.A. 1'^ 

De eodem pro ten in veteri polatria quod Johne.s Helyer tenuit 'M\. 
De Johne Chippenham bocher pro shopa in fine de Bocherew 

nuper Roberti Canne l^d. 

De eodem pro ten extra barras de Castelstrete prius Roberti Wade lOfd. 
De Johne Hampton Squier pro sliopa in bocherew quas Johnes 

Welle tenet 3id. 
De Rogero mayne pro ten cum taberna in quo Nichus Sagen 

manet ad stalla piscatorum 21^d. 
De eodem {)ro ten in Endelestete quod Edwardus Godyer Avever 

tenuit or^d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem quod Johnes Teuke tenuit 4|d. 

De eodem pro capitali ten in Carternstrete prius Johnis Mere 17d. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem juxta ten Rici Mille et modo Rici Hayne 2id. 

De eodem pro Shoi)a in Castelstrete 2;^d. 

De Johne Parrok wissher pro ten in novo vico 3d. 

De Johne Sligge pro ten in Brounstrete in quo manet 3d. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem in parte australi dicti tcnti 3d. 
De eodem j)ro gardino infra tenementum i)redictum prius 

Johannis Mannyng lOd. 

De eodem pro shopa ad stalla piscatorum Civitatis T^d. 

De eodem pro cotagio in milkemongerstrete 3 Id. 

De eodem pro cotagio in Gigorstrete prius Magistri Git 5fd. 
De Alicia Hendy vidua pro ten in novo vico vocato Sowthwelplace 

et in vico do lovelane 2s. 5^d. 
De eodem pro sliopa cum scelario Prius Johannis Swyft in parte 

oriental i ecclesie Sancti Thome 5d. 

De eodem pro ten Hugonis Deiclel fere ex opposito de Almeshous 6d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Gregorii Westby super trencheam 

civitatis in quo ipse manet 

Folio 157. 

De Thomas Husey pro ten super trencheam Civitatis nuper 

Willmi Alisaunder 12:^d. 
De eodem pro alio ten iljidem juxta ten predictum 7|d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Thome Chapelayne in Gigorstrete juxta 

ten nuper Gilberti Skynner 6.j. 

De eodem pro ten juxta tcMi dicti Thome in eodem vico 5:|d. 

De eodem i)r() ten in liroinistrcte in ([uo Joliaiines Peckham 

manet -l.^M. 
De eodciii pro Sliopa in Cokercw prius .Jolinis Lake et postea 

Thome Randolf Id. 

De c'odtiii ]iro ten in iio\() vico nuper Georgii Meriett 2d. 

De eodcni pro alio tm ii)i(lcin iiuiier dicti Gi^orgii -jd. 

De eodem pio Shopa iliidcni nnpcr Katlmc Malic -jd. 

^)Q.—[I)U( onhj 111 l>l<iiiL- 'iif)-/es.\ 
De eodem pro ten in Frerstrctt! ex (^]>]>osit() interiori i)()rte 

I'^iMtniin MniMinni ibidem ipiod W. I'liobus ft nuiicr tcnnit I'.d. 



74 Salisbury in 1455. 

De eodem pro cotagio juxta cotagium nuper Edmundi Enfeld 

ibidem 4|d. 
De eodem pro cotagio cum crofta vocato Grenecrofte in 

Melemongerstrete 4s. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Alicie Bertynn 4^d. 

De eodem pro cotagio juxta cotagium Johannis Bokbourne in 

novo vico 3d. 

De eodem pro cotagio in novo vico juxta angulare ten Petri 

Varrons Id. 

De eodem pro shopa ex opposito New Inne quas Willmus 

Brounyng nuper tenuit 6d. 

De eodem pro Shopa in Wheler Rew quam Johanes Thisbury 

nuper tenuit 12|d. 
De eodem pro Shopa ibidem quam Thomas Sampson tenet 12id. 

De eodem pro Shopa ibidem quam Johannes Foxe tenuit V^d. 

De eodem pro Shopa quam Johannis Pole ibidem tenet 6d. 

De eodem pro Shopa ad Fontem de Castelstrete l|d. 

De eodem pro ten angulari in Wynmanstrete in quo Ricardus 

Dyer mansit lOd. 

De eodem pro ten angulari in quo Thomas Tresham mansit in 

Wynchestrestrete 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in quo Edwardus Mede manet in Melemonger- 
strete 4d. 
De eodem pro fabrica cum gardino in quibus erat ten in quo 

Johannis Kendale mansit 6d. 

De Ricardo Shalston pro ten super trencheam in Winchestre- 

strete in quo W. Swyft manet lOd. 
De eodem pro ten in quo Willemus Bouerer baker mansit in 

Cartnstrete 7d. 

De Johanne Aporte pro ten perquisito de Cristina Yonge super 

trencheam 8 Id. 
De eodem pro ten in quo manet ex opposito fori prius Johnis 

Huet 2/7^. 
De eodem pro Shopa ibidem in quibus manet Johannes Poyntor 

et alii 2jd. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Johannis Marlew in parte boreali ten 

predicti 5d. 

De eodem pro ten in alto vico per portam Clausi Canonicorum 

Sarum nuper Alicie Corogan 2|d. 
De Episcopo Sarum pro ten nuper Reginaldi Barentyn super 

trencheam 13^d. 
De eodem pro ten in Pot Rew in quo Johannes Knyght inhabitat 4d. 

De eodem pro Shopa ibidem in parte occidentali dicti ten, in 

qua Thomas Cabbel manet 3d. 

Folio I57d. 

De Johanne Franke pro tenemento perquisito De Thoma Byre 

prius Johannis Willy cum Shopa in Carternstrete 9id. 



By the Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 



i 



De eodem pro cotagio in Ilolveston prius Johanne Judde 6id. 
De Koberto Inkpenne pro Shopa quondam Hugonis Crane ad 

finem de Carterstrete 6?d. 

De eodem pro duobus Shopis niiper dicti Hugonis S^d. 

De Nicholao Preterjon pro shopa ibidem in Carterstrete 6d. 

De eodem pro duabus Sliopis ibidem in parte occidentali 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in Brounstrete in quo Thomas Pese mansit 6d. 
De Alicia uxore Willmi Oryng chaundeler pro ten nuper Willmi 

J3asket in Brounstrete lid. 
De Johne Mone gentilman pro ten in Carterstrete in quantitate 

perquisito de Henrico Frende V^d. 
De eodem i)ro Sliopa in alto vico perquisito de Willmo Feror de 

Hunger!" ord 1 d. 

De eodem pro ten extra Barras de Castelstrete 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem prius Walter Nauder (or Nander) 6d. 

De eodem i)ro Shopa in Boclie Ptew prius Willmi Skillyng 4|d. 
De eodem pro ii tentis in Melemongerstrete prius Henrici Hare- 

brugh 3|d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper AVillmi Goudalp in Carterstrete juxta 

ten nuper Johannis Preston 2-4 d. 
De eodem i)ro ten vocato le Abbey in Carterstrete nuper Willmi 

Tuyl Vd. 

De eodem pro ten ibidem quondam Mauld Preston 13|.d. 

De eodem pro Shopa ibidem nuper Johannis Castleman 3d. 
De Johanne Willy pro ten cum lato hostio in parte boreali ten 

Johannis Congesby cum ii shopis ibidem 9id. 
De eodem pro angulari ten Johannis Payn dominum de Koke- 

borne cum iii shopis ibidm 18d. 
De eodem pro Shopa in Carternstrete juxta shopam nuper Roberti 

Inkepenne 3d. 

De eodem i)ro duabus Shopis in Carternstrete in parte vici ibidem 6d. 
De Petro Warons i)ro ten in Carternstrete in quo manet Willmus 

Colyns baker 3.id. 

De eodem i)ro solio in parlerium constructum 2d. 

De eodem pro palacio dicto ten pertinenti Ij. 
De Johanne Coninesby pro ten in Carterstrete prius Edwardi 

Prentis 3^ 

De Hein-ico Frend i)ro cai)itali ten in novo vico in (juo manet 2s. 3|. 

De eodem i)ro ten juxta ten predictum ibidem -2 Id. 
De eodem i)ro ten in Endlestrete modo Cecilic uxoris ipsius 

Henrici vocato Tokyercorner 7]d. 

De eodem pro ten in Cigorstrete i)rius Thome Andrew 2d. 
De eodem ])ro ten in Cigorstrete super Stei)hani Mercer uxoris 
ejusdem Ste])hani (({uery nuper) (f^ic) 

De Johanne Liuhh' jiro ten in novo vico iJ.Ul. 
De Johanne Hay yoman ])!•() ti'ii in novo vico ])rius Thome 

Chapelayn -l^d. 

De Abbate tie Stanley i)ro ten in novo vico 2d. 



76 Salisbury m 1455. 

De Clement Eawlyn pro ten in novo vico in quo manet 12d. 

De Willmo Taverner pro mesuagio empto de Amicia filia Willmi 

Nedeler in novo vico 10 jd. 
De Willmo White Yoman pro ten vocato le legge cum Shopa in 

alto vico lOjd, 
De eodem pro Shopa nuper Eoberti Wey ibidem 2|d. 

De eodem pro Shopa in alto vico Dominici Uphale quam Johannes 

Gower tenuit 5d. 

De eodem pro orreo super Barnewellescros quod Thomas Andrew 

tenet 2d. 

De eodem pro ten in alto vico ex opposito le Roose 2|d. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico nuper Johannis Hipeyard 4d. 

De.Editha nuper uxore Thome Oxforth pro ten versus inferiorem 

pontem de Fyssherton 3s. 

De eodem pro cotagio apud Yvibrigge perquisito de Johanne 

Tiffant 2d. 

De camerariis Civitatis pro hospitio de Gorgis 3^d. 

De eodem pro cotagio perquisito de eodem Johanne 2|d. 

De eodem pro ten juxta cimiterium Sancti Thome Sarum 4d. 

De eodem pro novo edificio Stalariarum Sancti Thome Sarum S^d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Thome Steed in Caste! strete 6d. 

De eisdem pro ten in fosso Civitatis vastato existente 9s. 6d. 

De eisdem pro ten nuper Johnis Mercer juxta superiorem 

pontem de Fisherton 4|d. 
De eisdem pro ten nuper Willmi Assheley in vico Sancti Martini 7|d. 
De eisdem pro ten nuper Willmi Walter ex opposito fori in quo 

Johannes Wise manet 3|d. 
De eisdem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete in quo Thomas Vont 

manet 4^d. 
Folio 158. 
De eisdem pro cotagiis in Nuggeston que Johannes de maiore et 

communitate tenuit 4^d. 
De eisdem pro hospitio vocato Pynnokes Inn in alto vico 3s. 7^d. 

De eisdem pro cotagiis nuper Margarie Goldemayston versus 

ecclesiam Sancti Edmundi 12id. 
De eisdem pro ten in quo Johannes Wheler modo manet prius 

Willmi Asshele 7d. 

De eisdem pro cotagiis in Brounstrete 4id. 

De eisdem pro Shopa in Wynmanstrete in qua Margeria Poris 

manet prius Johnis Park 4d. 

De eisdem pro angulari tenemento ad finem de Pot Pew ubi 

fructus venditur nuper Cristine Lye 2s. 7|d. 
De eisdem pro ten in vico Sancti Martini prius Thome Brug- 

hampton pro ten in quo T Wheler manet 2d. 

De eisdem pro latrina juxta ecclesiam Sancti Thome cum sole 1 2d. 

De eisdem pro Shopa in Wynmanstrete quondam Walteri Shirle 2id. 
De eisdem pro cotagiis et Rackis prius Willmi Childe in Endele- 

strete 7|d. 



By the Rev. Edmund II Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 77 

De eisdem pro curtilagiis dicti Willmi ibidem 4|d. 
De Nicholao Wedingrene barber pro Shopa et curtilagio in 

Wynmanstrete prius Roberti Goylen 4|d. 

De eodem pro ten in Wynmanstrete in quo Johannes Pyncheny 12fd. 

De Alisaunder Armestrang pro Shopa uxoris eius ad superiorem 

pontem de Fissherton 3d. 

De Johanne Perrante pro ten in Pot Ptew prius Simonis Tredenek 7d. 

De eodem pro ten quod vocatum est Scaldynghous 8d. 

De Johanne Wynchester barber pro ten juxta ecclesiam Sancti 
Thome Sarum quod Johannes Glaser chaundeler nuper 

edificavit 3d. 

De eodem pro Shopa quam dictus Johannes Glasier de Johanne 

Noble perquisivit 3d. 

De eodem pro ten in Gigorstrete quod tangit de Ahueshous 

l)rius Johannis Stokley 6d. 
De Magistro Johanne Borow pro ten juxta ecclesiam Sancti 

Thome Sarum 7d. 

De Dno Willmo Coke et Dno Pacardo White pro ten suo juxta 

ecclesiam Sancti Thome Sarum per 2s. 

De Cappelanis ecclesie Sancte Thome Sarum pro quadam latrina 

ibidem 12d. 
De Dno Willmo Duke capellano pro ten in Scottslane prius 

Walteri Shirley Ud. 
De Dno Johanne Drinkewater pro ten juxta cimiterium ec- 
clesie Sancti Thome Sarum 5M. 
De eodem pro ten ex opposito fori in quo Willemus Taverner 

manet 7^d. 
De eodem i)ro ten quod ad(iuisivit de Johanne Garge in Castel- 

strete quod vocatur le Cage 9d. 

De eodem pro cotagio in Scottislane in quibus fiat domus Elemo- 
; sinarum prius Willi Wliaren G^d. 

I De eodem pro ten ex opposito fori quod perquisivit de Johanne 

Shadde 2|d. 
I De Tlioma Waleis pro ten nuper Wilhni Warwik in Endelestrete 3d. 

I De Alicia Bonam pro ten in (luo Willnius Best manet 18d. 

. De Magistro Ricardo Lyoth pro tribus Sliopis in Pot Rew lO^d. 

\^77i7re blank €7iti-ies.] 

De Johanne Lavender ])ro ten in (|U0 manet per ecclesiam Sancti 

Thome 7M 
De Johanne Stoon iiro ten in (\no manet quondam Ricardi Oword 8^(1. 
De Wilhno Barley i)ro Slmpji in Wheler Rew nu])er Sinionis 

Tredenek 3.^(1. 

De Johanne lirode jno ten inCastelstrete vocatol(> li()rce([Uon(lani 

Nicliolai Langstock 7d. 



78 Salisbury in 1455. 

De Thoma Trevise pro ten in Castelstrete juxta tenementum 

Willmi Ludlow 8d. 

De Thoma Croos sadeler pro curtilagio in Melemongerstrete 19d. 

De Wiilmo Cornwaile pro ten in Wheler Rew 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in Carterstrete . 4|d. 

De eodem pro curtilagiis in Nuggeston 4d. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstrete prius Agnetis Langton 3|d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in Gigorstrete nuper Johannis TejQFence 3d. 

De eodem pro ten extra Castelbarrs prius Alicie Nobil 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in Vico de Culverstrete prius Thome Rede clerici Bid. 

De eodem pro alio ten in dicto vico ibidem 6d. 

Folio 158 dor so. 
De eodem pro gardino in Culverstrete nuper Johannis Smert fisher 2^d. 

De Wiilmo Ludlow pro ten Ricardi Etton nuper Henrici Baury 6d. 

De eodem pro ten Henrici Bonde 6d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Henrici Marcis 6d. 

De eodem pro ten juxta ten nuper Ade Teffont 6d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Rici Hacche in Gigorstrete 9d, 

De eodem pro ten quondam Henrici Baudery in Brouastrete 6^d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Martini Cripce lid. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis Baudrye 6|d. 

De eodem pro ten et postis ritro portam Suam in Gigorstrete 6^d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Ade Stanlinche S^d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis Bossopp 8d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Willmi Wichampton 6jd. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis Pudell l^d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis Marcye 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in vico Sancti Martini 2^d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Alicie Short 6d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam dicte Alicie 6d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Willmi Witthorn 6^d. 

De eodem pro ten angulari in Carterstrete vocato Sarasynhede 4|d. 

De eodem pro ten angulari in Wynmanstrete 6d. 

De eodem pro ten juxta ten idem 2d. 

De eodem pro ten recuperato De Edmundo Scercok Id. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis West 2^d. 

De eodem pro ten et columbario juxta barras 8d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis Milborne 2d. 

De eodem pro ten quondam Johannis Fristo in Gigorstrete 6d. - 

De eodem pro ten in Melemongerstrete 12d. 

De eodem pro ten in quo manet Willmus Corn wale 16d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Henrici Man in Vico Sancti Martini 3d. 

De eodem pro ten suo in Brounstret juxta aliud ten suum 2d. 
De eodem pro ten suo nuper Roberti Euyster in Gigorstret 

prius Georgii Joce 

De eodem pro ten nuper predicti Roberti in Novo Vico lOc 



By the Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 79 

De eodem pro solo pro posituri {sic) de novo aventate ibidem 2d. 
l)e eodem pro ten nuper Henrici Suthwik ex opposito porta 

vocato Seynt Anne gate 4^d. 

De eodem pro ten juxta scolas grammaticales in Draghall strete 4d. 
De eodem pro liospitio suo vocato Boore prius Thome Burford 2.s, V^d. 
De eodem pro ten in Scottislane empto de Johanne Wallop postea 

Joliannis Wasy draper 3.kl. 

De eodem pro ten uxoris Thome 1 1 ardy ng prius Dicti Thome 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in Winchestrestrete super Stephanum Lytlie- 

nard 9d. 

De eodem pro Shopis in Pot Rew prius Johannis Barnabe 4d. 
De eodem pro ten juxta ten Edmundi Asshele in Gigorstret in 

parte boreali 4d. 

De eodem pro ten in Endelestret ])rius Edwardi Frith lOd. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstret nuper Johannis Cliafyn 6|d. 

De eodem pro ten in Brounstret nuper Nicholai Peiterjonis 6d. 
De Johanne Hill pro ten in Castelstret nuper Willi Marchal 

capellani vocato le Faucon Hd. 

De eodem pro ten in vico Sancti Martini ad angulum 2|d. 

De eodem pro cotagio in dicto vico in parte occidentali 2d. 
De Johanne Bodington pro ten in quo manet in Chiperstret 

prius Johannis Nobil 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstret nuper Johannis Cornyche n^d. 
De Johanne Mone fuller in Castelstret quod adquisivit De 

Willmo Alisaunder 5f d. 
De Roberto Meteresse pro ten in Castelstrete in quo manet 

nuper Thomas Husy o^d. 
De Piicardo Waren dier pro ten uxoris sue in Winchestrestrete 

(luod dicta percella tenet nuper Agnetis Boiler 16|d. 

Folio 159. 
De Willmo Gill^ert filio et hcrede Roberti Gilbert taverner pro 

ten prius sui in Castelstrete 4^d. 

De eodem pro ten in parte boreali ten predicti lid. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Johannis Durnford dier in parte 

australi ten in quo predictus Robertus mansit 5d. 

l)e eodem i)ro ten nuper Johannis Whitford in Endelestrete 4^d. 

De eodem pro ten in Bolveston in (pio Johannis Edwod manet lOd. 
De eodem pro cotagiis in vico Sancti j\[artini ])erquisito Willmi 

Hore prius Henrici Herbourgh lUd. 
De eodem pro cotagiis in vico Sancti Martini in parte boreali ten 

nuper Thome Helier Td. 

De eodem jno ton in vico predicto de Dno Johanne Passager 2id. 

De eodem jjto t<n in vico in (pio Willenius Alderel mansit 8il. 

De eodem jnc sh()i)a in C]ii]>i)('ilane perquisito de Roberto Potter 2Ad. 
De Johainu> ('(>!> iigboni cU'rico i)r() ten cum curtilagio in Mele- 

monger.strete i)rius Rici Leche ;^Ad. 
De Pension. 



80 Salisbury in 1455. 

De eodem pro ten in Wynmanstrete prius Nicholai Melbury post 

obitum Alicie matris sue 5id. 
De 
De 
De 
De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete in quo Moricius Relley 

inhabitat Vd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis et curtilagiis in Melemongerstrete prius 

Johannis London mason 5f d. 
De Johanne Asshforth tailor pro ten in Castelstrete prius Will mi 

Syftor 2id, 
De Rico Cokle et Johanne Hamersmyth pro ten nuper Rici Gage 

in Endelestrete IGgd. 
De eodem pro ten perquisito de Johanne OvyngtonapudCastel- 

barrs V^d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Johannis Macham in Leystrete 3^d. 

De Rico Hayns tailor pro ten nuper Johannis Dannell in Castel- 
strete 5^d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Thome Beton in Castelstrete 4s. 8d. 

De Willmo Osgodby parsitor [?] ecclesie Sancti Edmundi pro ten 
extra barras in Castelstrete nuper Johannis Gilbarde de 
Walygnford 7fd. 

De 
De Johanne Gilbarde filio Johannis Gilbarde pro ten juxta Barras 

de castelstrete in quo Willmus Pragnell nuper mansit 

De filio et herede Willmi Grenynot pro cotagiis extra barras de 

Castelstrete in parte boreali vici V^d. 
De eodem pro ten in occidentali parte vici pro ten nuper Johannis 

Purdy 6id. 
De Johanne Hoode glover pro ten perquisito de Johanne Purdy 

in quo manet 5^d. 
De Johanne Shipton dubber pro ten in quo manet 6d. 

De Willmo Bedewel dubber pro ten Swftyn versus barras in 

Castelstrete V|d. 
De Dno Johanne Storton milite pro ten nuper Roberti Bunte pro 

pomerio longo predicto ten pertinenti 8s. 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in parte orientali ad finem de Castelstrete 13^d. 

De eodem pro messuagio in Castrumstreete nuper sou Henr sou {sic) Vfd. 
De eodem pro shopa in vico predicto que erat nuper Nicholai 

Melbury in part& australi messuagi predict! 6f d. 
De Henrico Somer pro ten nuper Rici Frer extra barras de 

Castelstrete 3s. 3|d. 
De eodem pro cotagiis et curtilagiis pomerio Tidelside 3s. 5|d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis ibidem juxta ten predict! Rici Frer 4d. 

De Johanne Mone de Evirley pro ten Isabelle Oake uxoris sue in 

Castelstrete extra brarras 16s. ^d. 
De eodem pro ten in Castelstrete perquisito de Willmo Mory 4^d. 

De tenento ten in Castelstrete vocato Cannenersars Place lid. 



By the Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 81 

De Willmo Soper pro ten nuper Willmi Crowte in Castelstrete 4d. 
De ten pro ten nuper Petri Downton in Endlestrete 4d. 
De eodem pro cotagio perquisito de Margaria Coscombe in Castel- 
strete 2^d. 
iJe Willmo Swyngel pro ten in Castelstrete servus Roberti 

Stonard 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in parte boreali ibidem nuper Juliane Stonard 

in Castelstrete 2id. 

De Rico Marcliel pro ten in Castelstrete prius Roberti Haselbery I7|d. 

Eolio 159 dor so. 

De uxore Joliannis Page pro ten in Castelstrete in quo manet 4|d. 

De eodem pro ten juxta ten predictum situatim in Scottlane 2|d. 

De relicta (juadani Walteri Hynde pro ten in Castelstrete ])rius 

Georgii Joce 9d. 

De Rico Warbulton pro ten in Castelstrete nuper Alicie 

Colyngborne 8d. 

De Johne Malpas pro ten in quo manet in Castelstrete nuper 

Roberti Potter 6d. 

De eodem pro Shopa in Castelstrete ex opposito le Cage 4d . 

De Johanne Chittern pro ten in Chippars Strete prius Willmi 

Purchase 2d. 

De Edwardo Doll[en] et Alicia uxore eius in Chipperstrete in 

quo manet 4d. 

De Willmo Schipton corvesor pro ten perquisito de Jolme Swyft 

in Castelstrete 4d. 

De eodem ])ro ten in Cliiperstrete perquisito de testamento 

Johnis Mone 4d. 

De Johne Lye gentilman pro Shopis super angulare in Castelstrete 3d. 

De eodem pro shopis ex oi)posito fori juxta fabricam ibidem IM. 

De eodem pro shoi)a in Pulletria 5fd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in utraque parte porte Simonis Poyin 

in Gigorstrete 3d. 

De eodem pro cotagio ilndem juxta cotagium Thome Knoyle Id. 

De eodem pro ten in novo Yico 20M. 

De eodem pro ten in Vico Sancti Martini 2^d. 

De eodem pro Sho})is ex opposito fori nu[)er Johnis Spicer 34d. 

De eodem pro cotagio imi)er Thome Gereberd 3d. 

De Ivico Stalbrig pro ten ex ()i)i)Osito fori 3d. 

De eddem ])ro I'otagio angulari ex op{)osito Barnwelcrosse in novo 

vico ()d. 

De Siiuoiu' I'oy pro ten in W'ynchi'strestrete i)rius Simonis 

llocshuU?] l.-.d. 

De eodem \no ten nuper Siniunis liusyng prius Simonis 

Stredener[?] 14d. 
De eodem pro ten nn]»er Crist ine Wantenge in Frerenstrete 3s. 

De eodem pro ten ex opjiosito I'cii in quo manet nuper Stephani 

Col>i)ar l.]d. 

irOL. XXXVII. — NO. CXV. (J, 



S2 Salisbury in 1456. 

De Thoma Freeman pro ten nuper Domini Willmi Buck in 

Castelstrete 3cl. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Katerine Bolde in Pot Rew 6d. 

De eodem pro ten adquisito de Johne Spenser ex opposito fori 6d. 
De eodem pro mesuagio ex opposito Cimiterii ecclesie Sancti 

Edmundi Sarum prius Johnis Lake 23d. 

De eodem pro cotagio et ten in Nuggeston nuper Stephani Harte lid. 

De eodem pro duobus angularibus ten in Nuggeston lOd. 
De eodem pro gardino nuper Johnis Cheny ex opposito cimiterii 

Sancti Edmundi Sarum 6d. 
De eodem pro ten aqisito de Roberto Watercombe ac ex 

opposito fori prope ten Predicti Thome 4^d. 
De eodem pro curtilagio nuper Galfridi Marnsil goldsmyth ad 

finem de Draghalstrete S^d. 

De eodem pro solo juxta clausum Sancti Nicholai 6d. 
De Rico Freeman pro capitali ten nuper Walteri Shirle in 

Castelstrete 19d. 

De eodem pro ten per portam ibidem prius Willmi Buck 2id. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Roberti Hasilberd juxta portam ibidem 4d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Walteri Nandir juxta Watirlane 6d. 

De Johne Wise vinter pro ten ex opposito fori Johnis Judde 6d. 

De ten pro ten (sic) nuper Edwardi Brom in Castelstrete 2id. 

De eodem pro cotagio in Melemongerstrete nuper Dionisie Cadger lid. 
De Willmo Jennys tanner pro cotagiis suis super angulare de 

Scottislane 2d. 
De eodem pro ten nuper Johnis Mareys perquisite de Roberto 

Chichyn 3d. 
De eodem pro ten in Chiperlane nuper Johnis Symond clerici 

et postea Johnis Bodyngton 2d. 
De Johne Wise draper pro ten in novo vico perquisito de Willmo 

Wilmote draper 3d. 
De eodem pro ten cum celario in Pot Rew perquisito de Edwardo 

Boner 6d. 

De eodem pro ten cum celario in Pot Rew prius Thome Chafyn 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstrete prius Roberti Blake lid. 

De Johne Wyoth mercer pro ten nuper Roberti Pyle in Endlestrete 2id. 

De Johne Baynton milite pro ten vocato le Abbay in Culverstrete 6d. 

Folio 160. 

De eodem pro ten in Chiperstrete quondam Johnis Pole 4d. 

De eodem pro quantitate solo ad f ossatum Civitatis in Wynman- 

strete 4d. 

De Nicholao Edmond pro ten in quo manet in Endelestrete nuper 

Johnis Evard 13id. 
De Nicholao Schote pro ten in quo manet in Endelstrete prius 

patris sui 35d. 
De Johne Fulbrok helier pro ten Margarie uxoris sue in Endel- 
strete 7jd 



By the Rev. Udmimd R. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 83 

De eodem pro ten ibidem juxta ten predictum 2fd. 

De eodem pro ten ad finem vici predict! 3d. 
De Philippo Nowel baker pro ten in quo manet in Endelstrete 

nuper Simonis Poy l^d. 
De Thoma Whiting wever pro ten in Scottislane nuper Robti 

Hampton 5|d. 
De Jacobo Thomlyn pro angulari ten in Endelstrete nuper 

Katerine Dounyng 5;ld. 
De Roberto Levedon pro cotagio in Scottislane juxta ten Willmi 

Writhe 3id. 

De Johne Cristmasse pro ten in Endelstrete prius Cristiane Dynn Sd- 

De Johne Wiliam toker pro ten in Endelstrete in (|uo manet 6d. 

De eodem pro gardino in Frerenstrete prius Robti Wolfe l|d. 
De Thoma Mog cowper pro ten in Endelstrete nuper Johnis 

Machyn 3d. 
De Johne Cristmas pro ten in vico Sancti martini nuper Alicie 

Mayn 3^d. 
Do Editha nuper uxore Stephani Cowper pro ten in Endelstrete 

nuper Johnis Machyn 6d. 

De eodem domo quas tenet de Edmundo Asshele 6d. 
De Johne JjOve pro ten in Endelstrete quod Johannes Gay 

quondam tenuit 4|d. 

De custodibus scissorum pro ten nuper Johnis Gay in Endelstrete 3d. 

De Chyft'e Tavern pro ten in Endelstrete 7d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis juxta ten prius Jacobi Cawndel 5d. 
De Domino Rico More capellano cantor Reginaldi Todeworth in . 

Endelstrete 4d. 

De Petro Daw pro ten in quo manet in Endelstrete 3d. 

De eodem pro Shopa juxto ten predictum l|d. 
De Roberto Chynchyn pro ten in Endelstrete in quo manet nuper 

Willehni Pakyn 2s. Ud. 
De Relicta Johnis Marchal pro ten in Rolveston i)rius Willmi 

Walter [Wysshforth erased] 3d. 

De Johne Parclie \)to ten in Rolveston i)rius Willmi Wyshforth 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem nuper dicti Willmi 14M. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem nuper dicti Willmi H^d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem nuper Alicie Harnhani 3d. 

De eodem i)ro Sho]us in Pot Rew nuper Stephani Hake 4d. 
De eodem ])ro cotagio in (ligorstrete ])rius Thome lirommor or 

Ih'ouniior 4}d. 

De eodem ])yo tni in Nuggi'ston ))iiiis l-'dithe Seryng 3;d. 

De .lohanne Honytiiorn ])r() ten in quo manet in Endelstrete lOd. 
De ]lico Grater pro duobus tenementis de novo edificatis prius 

Johnis Mannyng in Gigorstrete l.^d. 
De eodem ])r() IcMiijuxto riniit(Tiinn ecclesie Sancti Thome in quo 

manet Johannes lector "•Id. 

De W'illino Wilder pro ten in (|Un manet in luulclstrete (id. 



84 ' Salisbury in 1455. 

De Johne Stokis armigero pro ten nuper Stephani Popham milite 

in Boche Rew 4|d. 

De eodem pro ten ex opposito fori 8^d. 
De eodem pro capituli ten sive hospicii in Wynmanstrete vocato 

le Swan 2s. 8d. 
De eodem pro Shopa cum Selarico in novo vico prope angulum 

De Cauntolescorner 5d, 
De eodem pro Shopa curtilagio in Draghalstrete prius Henrici 

Popham 9d. 

De eodem pro ten in Endelstrete in quo Johnis Wyoth inhabitat 5d. 

De Willmo Childe pro ten in Wynmanstrete prius Willmi Sail 8|d. 

De eodem pro gardino in Frerenstrete Id. 

De Rico Belers pro ten in Wynmanstrete 3^d. 

De Rico Belers pro ten in Wynmanstrete prius Henrici Ham 3|d. 

De eodem pro gardino in Frerenstrete nuper Johnis Schad Id. 
De Andrea Brent pro ten in Castelstrete nuper Roberti Body 

juxta ten Johnis Camyl 9d. 

Folio 160 dor so. 
De eodem pro ten in quo manet in Wynmanstrete 8d. 

De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete nuper Edwardi Bonor 2|d. 

De eodem pro ten super trencheam Civitatis in quo manet 

Nichus Bromyng 6^d. 

gtus Martinus. 
De Willmo Hardyng pro ten ex opposito Gilde Aule Sarum in 

quo Ricus Walker inhabitat 7d. 

De eodem pro shopis in Cok Rew quas Philippus Larudis 

tenet l^d. 
De Rico Walker pro ten in Winchesterstrete super fossatum 

Civitatis 6d. 

De Johne Smarte pro gardino in Culverstrete nuper Johnis Devorel S^d. 
De Dionisia Grayner 1 pro ten nuper Willmi More in quo manet 6|d. 
De eodem pro gardino in Melmongerstrete l^d. 

De eodem pro duobus cotagiis in Melmongerstrete juxta portam 

Thome Jake 3d. 

De Simone Pasford cook pro cotagiis in Scottislane prius Johnis 

Hayne 3d. 

De Willmo Hoore pro ten adquisito de Willmo Warwick ex 

opposito fori 6d. 

De eodem pro curtilagio in Maccy Crofte prius Johnis Cole l^d. 

De eodem pro curtilagio nuper Johnis Judde perquisito de 

Roberto Judde fd. 

De eodem pro gardino in Frerenstrete nuper Willi Warter quod 

Johnes Wheler tenuit 2d. 

De Johne Bower pro ten ex opposito fori in quo Johnes Lumbard 

manet 6d. 

De Henrico Shad pro ten ex opposito crucis in foro perquisito 

de Johne Betnden 6d. 



By ilie Rev. Edmund It Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 85 

De Jolme Hampton pro ten in Wynmanstrete perquisito de 

executore Willmi Selle Od. 

De eodeni pro cotagiis in Brounstrete cum ten angulari 12d. 

De Willmo Cokks pro ten in quo manet in Brounstrete 5d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in Wynmanstrete cum ten angulari Sjd. 

De Thoma Gardyner pro ten in Wynmanstrete prius Kici Nedeler 5^d. 

De eodein pro duabus Sliopis in novo vico nupur Jolmis Nedeler 2d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in Culverstrete que f uerunt Johnis Ruddok 7d. 
De Johne Man pro ten Willmi Lorde in Wynmanstrete prius Rici 

Leche 2s 3id. 

De eodem pro ten in Castelstrete prius Willmi Lorde 3^d. 

De eodem pro ten juxta cimiteriuni Sancti Thome Sarum 5^d. 
De Raphael Sutwell pro ten in Castelstreete quod Willmus Prang 

nuper tenuit 6\d.. 
De eodem pro ten Magistri Nicholai Lorde in Gigorstrete 2^d. 
De eodein pro alio ten ibidem cpiod Walterus Sadeler nuper tenuit 6.^d. 
De eodem pro curtilagio nuper Willmi Warryn in ]\rartyncrofte 3^d. 
De Alicia Boteler pro ten in quo manet in Wynmanstrete 3id. 
De eadem pro ten juxta ten Perot (sic) prius Agnetis Levesham 2d. 
De eadem pro cotagiis dicte Agnetis in Gigorstrete 6f d. 
De eadem pro ten in (|uo Edmundus Peniston manet in Wyn- 
manstrete 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in novo vico quod Robertus Durant nuper tenuit 1 2d. 
De eodem pro ten et gardino juxta fossatum Civitatis 7d. 
De Johne Chaj)man wever pro ten in Wynmanstrete ^-^d. 
De relicto Johnis Brown cok pro ten in Wynmanstrete super 

Roberti Bowier 9d. 
De altari Sancte Crucis ecclesie Sancti Edmundi Sarum pro ten 

nuper Johnis Costobe in quo manet Walterus Stede 7|d. 

De eodem pro ten in Gigorstrete prius Rici Hethewolf 3d. 
De Thoma Rake et Paulina uxore eius pro ten in Wynmanstete 

prius Johnis Hampton 2s. 4d. 
De eodem pro cotagiis in Gigorstrete prius Agnetis uxoris Johnis 

Garge 7d. 
De Alicia Pette pro angulari ten in Wynmanstrete perquisito de 

Willelmo Penygton dud 9^d. 

Foh'o IGl. 

De eodem i)ro cotagiis il)idem juxta ten j)redictum o^d. 
De Jolme Dogood l)n'WL'r i)r() ten in Wymnanstrete i)rins Johnis 

Forest 6^d. 
De Joliiu' Wliittol^c^iiu'dr jiro tni in W'yiiniaiistrL'tc iin])er Johnis 

l-:stbury -Js. \\d. 

De eodcni prt) rutagiis in l)rMiinslrrU' prius W'altcri Shirley 7^d. 

Do Waltero Fadur jn-o tm iniii- sui in Ih-ouiistrctc! 'j\d. 

Do Johiu' Long(> i)ro ten in Ih-ounstrcte nuper ])rius sui Ud. 
De Thoma Goi'tiT pro cotagiis suis su])er anguluin de lu-ounstiH'tf 

et (Jiirorstrete HVl. 



S^ Salisbury in 1455. 

De eodem pro ten in quo Alicia Rede quondam mansit 2d. 
De Roberto Huchon pro ten in quo manet in Nuggeston nuper 

Willmi Chapman Vd. 
De eodem pro alio ten suo ibidem nuper Maioris et Communitatis 

Civitatis Sarum 4:^d, 
De Johne Archer pro ten in Gigorstrete in quo Johnes Grassewel 

manet Ijd. 

De Rico Coklet pro ten in quo manet in Gigorstrete 1 Jd. 
De Johne Gilberd de Terente pro cotagiis in Melemongerstrete 

nuper Alicie Benham 4d. 
De preposito ecclesie Sancti [erased] Edmundi pro ten suo juxta 

ecclesiam Sci Thome 8s. Sjd. 
De eodem pro cotagiis et curtilagiis juxta ecclesiam Sci Edmundi 5s. G^d. 

De eodem pro ten quod quondam Willmi Dier ibidem 9id. 

De eodem pro ten juxta Barnewelcrosse 6d.. 

De eodem pro aliis cotagiis ibidem lOd. 

De eodem pro ten cum ponte juxta Waterlane 7^d. 

De eodem pro ten extra barras de Castelstrete S^d^ 

De eodem pro ten nuper Willmi Knoll in Rolveston 6d. 
De eodem pro ten cum curtilagio ibidem nuper [de Elestoke 

erased] Rici Weston 6|d. 

De eodem pro ten cum curtilagio ibidem nuper de Elestok 6d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis suis in Gigorstrete ijd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis suis in vico Sci Martini 2^d. 

De eodem pro curtilagiis in Martincrofte nuper Durant 5jd. 
De eodem pro tofto juxta curtilagium nuper Hugonis Wynterborn 

in Gigorstrete Ijd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in Culverstret prius Johannis Monor 4f d. 
De eodem pro cotagio juxta portam Johnis Deverel quod erat 

eisdem Johnis Monor Id. 

De eodem pro gardino in Frerenstrete juxta fossatum l^d. 
De relicta Johnis Bremer pro cotagiis in quo manet inMelemongerstret 2id. 
De Johne Ston tailor pro ten suo in Melmongerstret prius Johnis 

Huyssh 4^d. 
De Edmundo Longton pro ten suo prius Nicolai Boteler in 

Culverstrete 3d. 

De eodem pro alio ten in Shipstrete nuper Willmi Pakyn 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten juxta ten ibidem nuper Johne Froute 4d. 
De eodem pro ten in vico de Culverstrete prius Thome Rede clerici S^d. 

De eodem pro alio ten in dicto vico ibidem 6d. 
De Rico Spershor sadeler pro ten in Melmongerstrete prius 

Willmi Mede 3id. 
De Johne Wyllyn de Hampton pro ten in Wynchestrestrete nuper 

Willmi Halstede |d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis nuper Willmi Reynold in Culverstreet Sfd. 
De eodem pro cotagio in eodem vico que pertinet dicto Sancto 

Trinitati 2d. 
De Rico Hogis carpentario pro cotagiis in Culverstret 16|d. 



By the Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A., FXA. 87 

De custodibus ecclesie Sancti Martini pro ten in Culverstret 

prius Edithe Cambay 3d. 
De Johanne Walithe pro ten apud Bernwelcros prius Willnii 

lleynolds 15^d. 

De eodeni pro duabus cotagiis in parte orientali dicte ten 3d. 

De Thoma Andrew pro ten in novo vico prius Nicliolai Heyward 2d. 
De Johanne Baton pro ten in Wyncliestre.stret in quo manet 

Agnes Noligham 8d. 

De eodem pro ten in quo manet in Wynchestrestret 4d. 

De eodeni pro ten in Wynchestrestret 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem prius Ricardi Kew Id. 
De eodem pro alio ten nuper Willmi Sail in quo manet Johannes 

Charelton 2d. 

Folio 161 dor so. 

De VValtero Birde pro ten in Gigorstret perquisito de Roberto 

Wramwel 4d. 

De Johanne Large pro ten in Wynchestrestrete perquisito de 

Gregorie Westby 6^d. 
De Roberto Ayleward pro ten in Winchestrestrete prius Ricardi 

Spenser 6d. 

De Johanna Camyl et Ricardo Hayn pro ten vocato le Bolehal 22d. 
De Ricardo Hayne 
De eadem Johanna pro ten vocato Hampton corner ex opposito 

crucis 13d. 
De eadem pro ten in Endelestrete 5d. 

De Johanne Schotli pro ten in quo manet in Wynchestrestrete 

prius Stephani Buck 6d- 

De Johanna Parson tanner pro ten in Winchestrestrete prius 

Johnis Bekth 7d. 

De eodem pro cotagio ibidem eidem ten pertinenti Id. 

De magistro Edwardo Chyltron pro ten in quo manet in Wyn- 
chestrestrete 4d. 
De eodem pro alio ten nuper Roberti Poynannte 12d. 
De eodem pro alio ten in Novo Vico versus inferiorem pontem 

de Fisherton 3d. 

De eodem i)ro solo super Barnwel crosse perquisito de John Willy 3d. 

De Willmo Willinote draper pro ten in Wynchestrestrete prius 

Johnis Tope 7d. 

De eodem j>ro ten nuper Ade Dunimer juxta tenementum predictum 5^d. 
An €7'astirf.] 
De eodem pro cotagio pL'r([uisito de Wiilnio Sail cum gardino 3^(1. 

De Domino Thoma Wysy pro ten in Wynchestrestrete et in 

Culverstrete nuper Johnis Woton llhd. 
[ De Rico iJek' pro ten Isabclle uxoris sue in Gigorstrete 3i|d. 

I De Nicho .Joyner pro ten in Gigorstrete iJercpiisito de Johne Kussel (Ul. 
De Walter© Sharioth sawer pro ten in Gigorstrete nupi'r Johnis 

Atkvn dicr M. 



88 Salisbury in 1455. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Johnis Padil quod non modo solum 

vacuum per fossatum civitatis 5d. 
De Thoma Towker de Heytesberi pro ten in novo vico nuper 

Johnis Brymley 6d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem juxta tenementum predictum 10|d. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico quondam Walteri Nander l^d. 
De Gilberto Kymer 

De custode domiis Sancte Trinitatis pro ten vocato almeshouws ejd. 

De eodem pro Shopis de novo aventato 42d- 

De eodem pro angular! ten cum cotagiis in Wynmanstrete 3|d. 

De eodem pro ten in novo vico versus Barnwel crosse 4d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Margarie Godmanston S^d. 

De eodem pro ten in Endelestrete 4d. 

De eodem pro Shopis in Bocherew lOd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in novo vico prius Willmi Hogyn 4id. 
De Thoma Balforth pro ten in Brounstrete perquisito de Domino 

Johne Manny ng 2id. 
De Willmo Balforth pro gardino nuper Johnis Bekoth in Fryren- 

strete 2id. 

De Willmo Weston pro ten in Brounstrete prius Johnis Teffonte 4jd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis per fossatum Civitatis 2d. 
De eodem pro ten in Brounstrete nuper Willi Cloke et postea 

Walteri Bride 4d. 

De ten nuper Johnis Teffante quod modo est solum vacuum 14d. 
De Johne Handsmyth wever pro ten in Brounstrete prius Johnis 

Cricanes 2jd. 

De Johne Gilmyn pro ten in Cartrenstrete nuper Chaundeler 5d. 
De eodem pro ten ibidem nuper predicti Johnis in quo Johnes 

Bird tailor manet 5d. 
De Roberto Eston pro ten in Wynchestrestrete nuper Johnis 

Chater smythe 3d. 

De eodem pro alio ten ibidem juxta ten predictum 12d. 

De Alicia Payn pro ten nuper Johnis Atkyn in Wynchestrestrete 6d. 

De eodem pro ten nuper Alianor Brembelshaw in Endelestrete 6d. 
De eodem pro angulari ten nuper Thome Fesannt in Endlestrete 

et Schipstrete 6d. 

Folio 162. 

De eodem pro curtilagio cum Rackis in Martincrof te prius Johnis 

De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete Sexamcote 15d, 

in quo Lucas Brasier manet (Johnes Thomas 7d.) lOjd. 

De Johne Halle pro ten in Carternstrete nuper Thome Mew 222d. 
De eodem pro ten versus superiorem pontem de Fisherton nuper 

Thome Packer 4d. 

De eodem pro Shopis juxta Scaldynghows que f uerunt Rici Gager 6d. 
De eodem pro ten in Carternstrete nuper Rici Mille et postea 

Rici Hayte lO^d. 



By the lle/o. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 89 

De eodem pro ten in Carternstrete niiper Willi Hogliton et postea 

Thome Alabie 20d. 
De eodum pro ten ([uondam Johnis PaxhuU nuper Huet Gilberd 

ex Castelbarris 4fd. 
De eodem pro ten in quo manet nuper Waltcrus Oorogan super 

trencheam civitatis 12-4~d. 
De eodem pro quantitate gardini eisdem ten adjecente quam 

perquisievit 4d. 

De eodem pro duobus ten super trencheam vocatis le Bole 20d. 

De eodem pro shopis ex oi)posito New Inne nuper Edwardi Ashele 6d. 

De eodem pro ten angulari ex o})posito Edwardi Chiltren in 

Wynchestrestrete 6d. 

De eodem pro ten in Wynchestrestrete vocato le Bolelial 22d. 

De eodem pro angulari ten ad finem de Pot Hew ad tabernam 18d- 

De eodem pro (juantitate soli De novo aventato pro taberna alar- 

ganda 2d. 

De eodem pro ten in Brounstret juxta ten Edwardi Ludlow nuper 

Alicie Owyng lid. 

P7-aUcm. 

De ten cum curtilagio juxta cimiterium ecclesiaj Sancti Martini 

nuper Radulphi Packer 18d. 
De Willmo Remet pro ten in vico Sancti Martini prius Johnis 

Hampton 9d. 

De eodem pro cotagio ibidem in parte orientali ten predicti 6d. 

De Johne Heme piper kene de Allmeshows pro ten versus ec- 

clesiam Sancti Martini prius Thome Rayner lO^d. 
De Alicia Whithorn pro ten in Vico Sancti Martini juxta fossatum 

Civitatis Id. 

De Olivero Benliam pro ten in vico i)redicto prius Johannis 

Salisbury Id. 

De Johne Larde tiler pro ten in vico Sancti Martini vocato Stapulhal 1 8d. 
De eodem i)ro ten cum columbario in vico predicto 13d. 

De Thoma Benet helier pro ten in quo manet in vico Sancti 

]\rartini cum cotagio adjacente 13i. 

De Domino Willmo Oke i)ro ten in Vico Sancti Martini in quo 

Ricus Sexy manet 3d. 

De ca])ellano Ancel Ilebbyng de Dounton i)ro ten in Vico Sancti 

Martini in (^uo Ricus Si)in(leler nui)er mansit 8d. 

)(' ( 'oristariis ecclesie Sarum pro ten in Vico Sancti ^fartini 8d. 

)(' Thoma Lcykcr tanner jiro ten in vico Sancti Martini a])U(l 

Ivibng 3^a. 

)(' Wilhiio la I lilt r pro ten in vico Sancti .Mart in i juxta I'^ratnini 

niinoruni KUd. 
)(' rclicta Tlionic St()|> pro ten in \"\vo Sancti .Martini prius 

Margarete Faket 3 4 

)v codcni pro cotau-iis in ( 'ul\ erst rctc nu]>cr Joliuis ('-urta>s ;")d. 

)c coilt'in pro uMi''lini> prius Tlionif llryngi'liainpton ultra triMiclicain ."^1. 



90 Salishury in 1455. 

De Priore domus Gederose pro ten in Vico Sancti Martin 9d. 
Be Johne Wheler pro ten in Vico Sancti Martini nuper Egidii 

Lichebarw 2/9 

De Roberto Watts pro angulari ten ex opposito Frateun Minorum 2id. 

De Thoma Harkyn de Barforth pro ten in Brounstrete 6d. 

De Henrico Long pro ten in Brounstrete nuper patris sui 6d. 
De John Hurste de Fordyngbrig pro una parte ten landlane in 

Brounstrete 3d. 

De Thoma Glover pro alia parte euisdem ten 3d. 

De Johne Sever pro ten in Brounstrete quod Johnes Postele tenet 2d. 

Folio 162 dor so. 

De eodem pro gardino cum columbario in Frerenstrete 2id. 
De Thoma Bower gentelman pro cotagiis nuper Willi Warmwel 

in Frerenstrete 3d. 
De eodem pro angulari ten nuper Johnis Beket in vico Sancti 

Martini 6d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis nuper Willmi Tambrig in Frerenstrete 5d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in vico Sancti Martini prius Johnis Horton 7d. 

De eodem pro ten in Draghalstrete perquisito de Thoma Payn 2d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in Draghalstrete que fuerunt Willmi White 4d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis nuper Willmi Shir ibidem 5:jd. 

De eodem pro cotagiis nuper Thome Castleton ibidem 3d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis nuper Cristine Waleys ibidem 6d. 
De eodem pro ten juxta scolas Gramaticales perquisito de 

canonicis Sarum 7d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis nuper Edwardi Cobeler Id. 
De eodem pro duobus cotagiis in Draghalstrete fere ad finem 

dicti vici 6d. 
De eodem pro ten ex opposito Brew Crof te perquisito de Willmo 

Godfray 6^d. 
De eodem pro gardino nuper Johnis Tutsey in Frerenstrete quam 

per cartam monstrat l^d. 

De eodem pro gardino citra ten Johnis Crikmor 8d. 

De eodem pro cotagio perquisito de Simone Poy in Draghalstrete 2d. 
De Edwardo Alisaunder pro cotagiis in vico de Gigorstrete nuper 

Stephani Haywode 6d. 

De eodem pro cotagiis in Nuggeston nuper dicti Stephani 4d. 
De eodem pro duobus cotagiis in Melmongerestrete quondam 

London mason {sic) Sjd. 
De Johne Crickmor pro ten in Draghalstrete perquisito de Roberto 

Gilbert 6^. 

De eodem pro ten in dicto vico tendente a dicto vico in Frerenstrete 4jd. 

De Johne Hart carpenter pro ten nuper Walteri Plowman 8d. 
De Johne Edmunds pro cotagiis ad finem de Draghalstrete prius 

Johis Hembury 9d. 

De eodem pro gardino empto de W illmo Warter pellitario London 2d. 



By the Rev. Edmund It Nevill, B.A., F.S.A. 91 

I>e Willmo Hendy pro ten in Frereiistrete perquisite de VVillmo 

Alisaunder 18d. 

De Fratribus Minoribus Sarum pro ten nuper Petri Wivelford 9d. 

De eisdem pro ten quondam Willi Cosyn lOd. 

De eisdem pro ten quondam Johnis at Werk lid. 

De eisdem pro ten quondam Johnis Bucland 2/11. 
De Isabella Sowthir wid als Buchold pro ten in quo est Solum 

Vaccuum cum gardino 2/1 i. 



92 



NOTES ON IMPLEMENTS OF THE BEONZE AGE FOUND 

IN WILTSHIEE, WITH A LIST OF ALL KNOWN 

EXAMPLES FOUND IN THE COUNTY. 

By the Eev. E. H. Goddaed. 

Dr. Oscar Montelius, in his important paper on " The Chronology 
of the British Bronze Age," printed in Archmologia, Ixi., 97 — 162 
(1908), has attempted to do for Great Britain what he had already 
done for the Continent, viz., to fix approximately the actual as 
well as the relative age of the various types of weapons and im- 
plements found in these islands which can be classed as belonging, 
broadly speaking, to the age of Bronze. Whether his conclusions 
will all be accepted by future archaeologists remains to be seen, 
but it is certain that they will be widely quoted. Following the 
general tendency of recent writers he pushes back the dates of 
the introduction of both iron and bronze some hundreds of years 
beyond those suggested by Sir John Evans. Thus he places the 
beginning of the Iron Age in Great Britain and Ireland at about 
800 B.C., and the beginning of the Bronze Age at about 2500 B.C., 
dividing the intervening 1700 years into five periods : — 
Period I., from cir. 2500 to 2000 B.C. 

„ IL, „ „ 2000 to 1600 B.C. 

„ ILL, „ „ 1600 to 1400 B.C. 

„ IV., „ „ 1400 to 1150 B.C. 

„ v., „ „ 1150 to 800 B.C. 

Period I. 

Period I. may, he says, more correctly be called the " Copper 
Age," for most of the metal objects in use during this period were 
of copper " without any intentional alloy of tin," ^ or it may equally 
well be regarded as the last stage of the Stone Age, for it is 

^ Meaning that such tin as is to be found in them is not in greater pro- 
portion than the small amount often present naturally in copper ores. 



Notes on Im'plemcnts of the Bronze, Age fo^tnd in Wilts! tire. 93 

characterized by the presence of Flint Celts, Arrowheads, Scrapers, 
and Daggers, perforated Stone Axe-Hammers, conical Buttons of 
shale, bone, or jet, sometimes covered with thin gold, Beads of 
amber and jet, Bracers or Wrist-Guards of stone and bone, and 
Drinking Cups, and Food Vessels of pottery. The flat copper Celts 
of Ireland are assigned to this period, and also the tanged flat- 
bladed Daggers, of wliich the most remarkable examples are those 
from the lioundway and Mere Down Barrows, at Devizes, and 
from the Winterslow J^>arrows, at the Ashmolean Museum. Dr. 
Montelius, states definitely that these are of copper; on what 
authority does not appear, inasmuch as, so far as is known, neither 
of these Wiltshire examples liad at the time of the publication of 
his paper been analysed. 

Period II. 

To Period II. he assigns some perforated Stone Axe-Hammers, 
though implements of stone are very rare; flat Bronze Celts, 
Hanged Celts without stop ridges ; Bronze rivetted Daggers or 
Dagger-Knives, with flat blades or with central rib, and Halberds ; 
conical Buttons of Shale, &c. ; Cinerary Urns of Pottery ; and, in 
Ireland, the Golden " Lunettes " for the neck. 

Period III. 

In Period 111. there were no stone implements. Flanged Bronze 
Celts, Palstaves, rivetted Daggers, ferruled Daggers,^ funicular 
Torques of Bronze or Gold, Armlets, narrow Chisels, and unsocketLul 
Sickles, occur. 

l*Ki;i()i) TV. 

To Period \\. brloiii^^ Ihonze Palstaves, Celts with sipiare 
sockets, h*;ij)i('is, and liapi^'i-shaitiMl Daggers, Leaf-shaped Swords, 
and S(>al)l)ai(l lips, IJa/.ors, ring-head<Ml Pins, tanged broad Chisels, 
Gold funicular Aiuilcls, and socketcil and loo[)ed Spearheads. 



' S])earhca(ls, acH-ordin.i; to Caii«>ii ( Irrcnwell, 



^4 Notes 071 Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

Period V. 

To Period V. belong the later Palstaves, and the bulk of the 
rocketed implements, Celts, Hammers, Chisels, Gouges, Daggers, 
Spearheads, often with crescent openings in the blade, Knives, and 
Sickles. Also i)road-bladed tanged Chisels and Gouges, Leaf-shaped 
Swords and Scabbard tips, one-edged Knives, Razors, Shields, 
Trumpets, Bridle Bits, Pins, Gold Bracelets, and King Money, 
Bronze Bowls, and tanged Knives. 

Dr. Montelius regards the burials of Periods 1. — III. as being 
either by cremation or inhumation and as being for the most part 
in barrows. The burials of Period IV. are by cremation in barrows 
.and cairns, or in cemeteries without barrows. Those of Period Y. 
are by cremation in barrows, or in cemeteries, with or without urns. 
But it is to be remarked that for this last period he can only pro- 
duce in all three examples of burials from Scotland, and none at 
all from England. Again, so far as Wiltshire is concerned, it may 
safely be said that not one out of the hundreds of barrows in the 
county, of the opening of which we have records, can be with any 
certainty assigned to any period later than the first three ; that 
is to say, that so far as the evidence of the "finds" goes, we have 
nothing to show that in Wiltshire we have any burials of the period 
between 1400 and 800 B.C. It was during these six hundred 
years that the later types of Bronze implements, especially the 
socketed types, Celts, Gouges, Spearheads, and the Rapiers and 
Leaf -shaped Swords and Daggers were in use. There is no sign 
of the presence of any of these implements in the barrows of 
Wiltshire,^ or any evidence that there are in the county any 

^ It is true that a small socketed and looped Spearhead (No. 1*75) which was 

very unfortunately wrongly 
identified by Dr. Thurnam 
{Arch., xliii., 447) as having 
been found in a barrow at 
Wilsfordwith a cremated inter- 
Socketed looped Spearhead found ment, has often been quoted , 
under turf m a Barrow. S ^^^ ^.jj probably continue tO 
be quoted, as proof that this barrow at least was of the later period of the 
Bronze Age, in spite of the fact that Mr. W. Cunnington (TT.^.i/., xxi., 262) 
has shown conclusively that this Spearhead was really found only just under 




By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 95 

barrows or cemeteries without barrows of a date later than Period 
III,, of Montelius ; though if we assume that for some reason the 
people of the later Bronze Age gave up the previous custom of 
burying their implements with the dead, many of the barrows 
which contain a single interment of cremated bones without any 
otlier relics by which their age might be determined, may possibly 
be referable to this later period. But it is not merely in the in- 
terments, which indeed are but doubtfully known elsewliere, but 
in the implements themselves, that Wiltshire is largely lacking. 

It is, indeed, singular that a county, which is richer than any 
other part of England in relics, both in bronze and gold, of the 
earlier period of the ]3ronze Age, represented by the barrow in- 
terments, should be able to show so few examples, comparatively 
speaking, of the later period of that age, when the bronze Swords 
and Daggers, socketed Celts, Spearheads, and other implements 
often found in considerable numbers in other parts of England, 
were in use. 

We can hardly suppose tliat a district which evidently possessed 
such a large population in tlie earlier period of the Bronze Age 
ceased to be inhabited when men no longer buried their bronze 
weapons with their dead, especially when we know that later, 
again, the Romano-Britisli population was as dense on the Wiltshire 
Downs as in any part of Britain. A more probable explanation 
of the absence of these implements would seem to be that Wiltshire 
possesses neither large rivers like the Thames, nor turbaries and 
bogs, such as exist in Somerset and Devon and the northern 

the turf in a barrow near Stoneheiige in 1802, and in all probability w;is 
of much later date than the barrow itself. The object actually found 

with the cremated interment at ,, .._._ 

Wilsford, ])artly melted by the / ~~----..^_ 

heat of the funeral ])ile, though ; :' ""; i^^^^\, '-^ 

«'all(!(l by Hoarea " Lance Head," ■ ^^^'^"^s ,'^^''*''^v ""^. 

is really a small Knife Dag^jer [ it''^'K'*^^^K^f^''''^^i^*^ '- 

with two rivets, and still exists ; I ■' ■-' )t39r^''^^k^^^ 

as No. 211 of tlu" Stourhead ! Vi<i--)»K^i^,.->''^^ -" . , - 

Collection at Devizes. (No. W.) : ....--"'" 



Small KnitV UapRcr half im-ltod with 
heat ot" fiiiu'ial pilr. Krom bai row at Wilsford. 



96 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

counties of England, nor fens like those of East Anglia ; for it is 
from rivers and fens and bogs, both in Ireland and in England, 
that a large number of the later bronze implements have been 
recovered. The chalk downs of Wiltshire offered far fewer facilities 
either for the original loss of such implements or for their preser- 
vation to remote ages when lost. This, however, does not account 
for the absence of bronze-founders' hoards deliberately concealed,and , 
so far as I am aware, only one such founder's hoard — that from Don- 
head, now in Farnham Museum — has been discovered in the county. 
Whatever may be the true reason, it is certain that Wiltshire 
has, compared even with some of the neighbouring counties, very 
few relics of this period to show, and such as there are have for 
the most part never been recorded or described in any Wiltshire 
publication.^ Before, however, coming to these later implements, 
it may be worth while to mention a few of the more remarkable 
of the earlier implements from the barrows which have been de- 
scribed and illustrated by Hoare, Thurnam, and others. In at- 
tempting, as I have done at the end of these notes, to compile a 
catalogue of all the bronze objects (of the Bronze Age) recorded as 
found in the county, the difficulty of attaining to anything like 
accuracy is very great. I do not, indeed, think that any considerable 
number of objects now existing either in museums or in private 
collections has escaped notice;-^ but, on the other hand, in quite a 
number of cases where " Brass Spear Heads " or " Lance Heads " 
are mentioned in Ancient Wilts, ov elsewhere, there is no possibility of 
identifying them with any specimens now existing. I have assumed 
that these " Spear " or " Lance " heads, found in barrows, were in all j 
cases really Daggers or small Knife Daggers, an opinion which Hoare 

1 " Notes on Objects of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire," with the 
illustrations comprised in five of the plates accompanying this paper, ap- 
peared in The Reliquary and Illustrated Archceologist, Oct., 1908. The 
illustrations given m the text are mostly from the Catalogue of the Stourhead 
Collection^ and are in many cases reduced from the engravings in Hoare's 
Ancient Wilts. 

2 The only objects as to which I am conscious that the list is imperfect, 
are two or three Celts or Palstaves in the collection of Mr. J. W. Brooke, of 
Marlborough, which I have not been able to include. 



By the Eev. E. H. Goddard. 97 

himself expresses in the later portion of his work; and I have so 
entered in the list all that are mentioned in Ancient Wilts. There 
is no evidence that any one of them was really a Spear head. 

Many of the smaller Knife Daggers were apparently never pre- 
served at all, others were never labelled, or have lost their labels, 
and are now only noted in the Stourhead Catcdogue as from an " un- 
known locality/' though the strong probability is that they are 
most of them from Wiltshire barrows. 

These Daggers and Knife Daggers, of various shapes and sizes, 
are by far the conmionest of all the bronze objects found in barrows 
in Great Britain, with the exception, perhaps, of the small Awls, 
but in no other county have so many or such fine examples been 
found as in Wiltshire, and no museum in England possesses so 
large a series as our own Museum at Devizes. 

Beckoning the bronze blades recorded by Hoare and others as 
" Lance Heads," as in reality riveted Daggers or Knife Daggers, 
but excluding "Eazors" and "Lancets," I find that the number of 
these blades recorded from the county reaches a total of ninety-one, 
of which thirty-seven are at Devizes, fifteen in the British Museum, 
three at the Blackmore Museum, two at the Ashmolean, and four 
in private hands ; leaving thirty which cannot now be traced.^ 

Of the tanged Hat-bladed Daggers, generally with a rounded 
point, and associated with drinking cups and other objects of the 
earliest age of bronze, Devizes possesses three, that from the 
bariow at Eoundway with a broad blade lOin. in length (No. 2), 
another from Mere Down (No. 1),- and a third and much smaller 




'lang^ed Uaggei" of Copper. Roundway (No. z). 



' A8 stated above there are ten small Knife Da^/^'crs in the Stourhoad 
Collection, nnlalx^lled, wliicji an* doubtless to he identitieil with many of 
the "small brass laiici heads" mentioned in Anrirnt U'ilfs. 

• The niunhers r< icr to the list of Bronze Oiijects at the vud oi this pai>cr. 
VOL. XXXVII. — NO. (XV. II 



98 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 




blade from an unknown locality, probably in Wiltshire (No. 6). 

The Ashmolean has two important examples from Winterslow 

— one with a rounded, the other with 

a sharp point (Nos. 4 and 5) ; and the 

^ , rr T r^ r ^ Brltisli Museum one from a barrow 

1 angea Knife Dag'g-er or Copper. i 

Mere Down Barrow (No. i). i near Lake (No. 3). In all probabihty 
these flat tanged Daggers are, as Montelius asserts, of Copper, as 
Nos. 1 and 2 have recently (June, 1911) been analysed by Dr. 
W. Gowland and have been found to have no admixture of Tin. 
This fact is of considerable importance, as up to the present time 
no Copper implements have been known to exist in England. A 
" Copper Age " seems to be thus established for England as well 
as for the Continent. 

Of the broad flat-bladed riveted Daggers or Knife Daggers with 
rounded points, which are assigned to Period II., a fine example 
from a barrow at Brigmerston (No. 7), with nine rivets in the blade 
and twenty-two in the handle, is at Devizes. Others with three 




i 



Flat-bladed Dag-ger from Brlg-merston (No. 9). ^ 

and five large rivets respectively, from barrows at Syrencot (No. 9), 
and Homington (No. 10), are in the British Museum. Perhaps to 
an early part of this period (II.) should be assigned tlie remarkable 
Dagger from Normanton Bush Barrow (No. 11), with a broad flat 
pointed blade lOfin. in length, six small rivets, and a very small tang. 




Dagger from Normanton Bush Barrow, (No. ii). ^ 

It is of a type which is known in Brittany, but of which no other 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 



99 



example lias occurred in Britain. The hilt was encrusted with a 
chevron pattern formed l^y thousands of minute gold pins. 

In the same barrow, however, with this Dagger was found 
another of (piite a different type, a heavy blade with stout midrib, 
also with six rivets, and 13in. in length — the largest Dagger found 
in the county (No. 24). 

It is, however, the true leaf-shaped riveted Daggers of Period III., 
with their elegant forms, strong heavy blades thickened in the 
middle, sharp points, with most commonly three rivets, and a 
semi-lunar mark upon the butt end, where they were fixed to the 
hilt, that are most characteristic of the barrows of Wiltshire. They 
are fine well-made weapons, a series of engraved border lines fol- 
lowing the curve of the blade, whilst tlie surface of the central 
portion is often covered with fine pounced dots. 




Row Barrow, nr. South Down Farm (No. i()l. \ 

Those here ilhisti;iled are all at Devizes. The Winlei boiuiie Stoke 
Dagger (No. 2-) may be taken to be tyi)ical, with three rivets. 
That from Lake (Xd. LM ) hail six, whilst llu> South Down Farm 
example (No. IG) is iiarruwcr in the bhul(> tliaii is usual in this 
class of Dagger. AnuLher (Nt). Ijo), from a barrow at Idmisloii, 
has a lliiii I'ladr liroad at. the butt with six small rivets, rajudly 

II '1 



100 Notes on Iinplements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

narrowing to a sharp point, with engraved lines following the 
outline. 

Dr. Montelius appears to regard the small triangular pointed 
Knife Daggers, such as that from Wilsford, here figured, with fiat 
plain blades, and two or three rivets, and 2in. or Sin. in length, as 
amongst the earliest of the Bronze Daggers, after the tanged 
examples. They are more frequently found than the larger blades, 
however, and it seems difficult to limit them to the earlier period. 




Wilsford Barrow i6. (No. 6j). 

A remarkable blade from (No. 93) Winterbourne Bassett (Plate 
IV., Fig. 3), found probably by flint-diggers many years ago, and 
not from a barrow, does not seem to belong to any of the classes 
of Daggers mentioned already as found in the barrows, or to that 
later class which still remains to be dealt with. It is a narrow 
straight-sided blade 7^in. long, with a midrib down its whole length 
and three rivets arranged in a way which suggests a likeness to 
some continental weapons found in the Swiss Lake Dwellings and 
elsewhere, rather than to any of the recognised types of Dagger 
found in Britain. N"o other example at all like it has occurred 
in the county. 

Leaving this abnormal Dagger out of the reckoning, Wiltshire,, 
with its ninety-one Daggers and Knife-Daggers of the three earlier 
periods, has but one leaf-shaped Sword and four Eapier or leaf- 
shaped Daggers of the later periods, to show — a sufficiently re- 
markable contrast, when the number of these later weapons found 
elsewhere in England is considered. 

The one and only sword (No. 99) 24in. long x IJin. wide, with 
six rivet holes at the base of the blade, and two in the hilt plate^ 
is now in the Ashmolean Museum,^ having been ploughed up in 

^ For details as to this and other objects in the Ashmolean I am indebted 
to Mr. E. Thurlow Leeds, of that Museum. 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 101 

1704, within the enclosure, of Figsbuiy Eings, "about 2 miles 

from Sarum." 

Of the sharp-pointed rapier-shaped Daggers with two rivets I 
have only been able to discover four found in tlie county : — two 
long weapons 14|in. and 14Jin. in length, found on Wilsford Down 
•(Plate IV., Fig. I.) and Fisherton Anger, and now preserved in the 
Devizes and Blackmore Museums respectively (Nos. 96, 97); 
and two shorter weapons of about lOin. in length, one of which 
<No. 94) from Teffont Magna (Plate IV., Fig. 2) is at Devizes, 
and the other (No. 95), from the Marlborough neighbourhood, in the 
private collection of Mr. J. W. Brooke. 




Dag-g-er (?) in the Stourhead Collection. (No. 9S.) 

The curious swan-bill shaped blade (No. 98), from an unknown 
locality, probably in Wiltshire, in the Stourhead Collection, at 
Devizes, has perhaps been formed by rubbing down a fragment of 
one of these rapier-sliaped Daggers. No other example of this 
shape seems to l)e known. 

Of the various types of Celts and Palstaves Wiltshire has no 
very large numl)er to show, compared with the numbers found in 
many other counties. 

Of the earliest type, the perfectly Hat and plain Celts assigned 
by Montelius to Period 11.,^ only two seem to have been recorded, 
one (No. 100), now in the l>lackmore Museum (Plate VL, Fig. 2), 
and anotlier (No. 101), said to have been found " in the Long Barrow 
at SLoncluMige." 

Of th(^ next typo, nearly Hat, ])ut tapiMiiiL; cacli way from the 
thick(Mi(>(l (-(Mitre, with \(My slight, if any, si(lt> tlanges, a tine 
«'xani))l(^ (No. 1 02), from NDiananton Ihish IJanow. is at Devizes ; 
und ill the Stourhead Collection there are two small ].laiii Celts 
without tlanges, measuring 2Jin. and l]iii in length respectively, 
' Thr Iri-li cnpiMT Cclt^ of this tyjM' :ire assigned to Period 1. 



102 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltslvin 



from unknown localities, which are not improbably Wiltshire 
examples. 

Of flanged Celts without stop, six are recorded, of which three 
are at Devizes. Three of these were found in barrows (Nos. 104 
— 106). ISTos. 105 and 106, here figured, are small and almost flat 





Wilsford Barrow i8 (No. 105). Wilsford Barrow 9 (No. 106), 

with very slight flanges. Nos. 103 and 108, of a somewhat later 
type, with deep flanges and a semi-circular cutting edge, belonging, 
probably to Period III, of Montelius, were found on West Lavington 
Down and near Wootton Bassett. 

Of the Palstaves, which belong to the three last Periods of the 
Bronze Age, and are not found in the barrows, about twenty-nine 
have been recorded, nearly equally divided between those with 
loops and those without. The examples from the downs above 
Lavington (No. 129) and (No. 123) from Broad Hinton, are good 
examples of the typical Palstaves with long slots, strong midribs, 
and loop. Another, much of this type, but with a prominent 
Y-shaped ornament in front of the stop (No. 134), is from Swindon. 




Palstave from Swindon | (No. 134). 

That from Avebury (No. 109), of a narrow chisel-like type 
without loop or deep slots^ and No. 112, from Beacon Hill, are 
probably of an earlier date than the last. Another, of quite a 
different type (No. 110), probably of a late period, in the Blackmore 
Museum, is illustrated (Plate VI., Fig. 1). 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 103 

Socketed Celts, looped and unlooped, all of them probably either 

of the later IV. or V. Periods, number about twenty-four. The 

broad-bladed example found at Erchfont (No. 152), Plate V., Fig. 7, 

is a good one of this type, whilst, on the other hand, that from 

Temple, in Mr. Brooke's Collection (No. 157, Plate XL, Fig. 12), is 

remarkable for its plain narrow straight-sided blade, and almost 

exactly resembles another specimen, 5Jin. in length, from Chilton 

Foliat, in the same collection (No. 140). Sir John Evans (Bronze 

Im'plements, p. 115, fig. 120), speaking of this type of Celt, says that 

it is found 

"principally, if not solely, in our Southern Counties ; the type is indeed 
Gaulish, rather than British, and is very abundant in the north-western 
part of France. It appears probable that not only was the type originally 
introduced into this country from France, but that there was a regular 
export of such Celts to Britain." 

A very small plain socketed and looped Celt at Devizes (No. 161) 
is figured, Plate V., Fig. 6. 

Socketed cliisels belonging to the latest period have occurred 
twice only ; a fine straight-sided implement with oblong socket, of 
rare type (No. 172), at Highworth, and a roughly-made implement 
with flattened spud-shaped blade (No. 173), at Alderbury. The 
latter is probably of very late date (Plate VI., Fig. 4). 

A single socketed Gouge (No. 174) of the same period was found 
at Oldbury Camp (Plate IL, Fig. 11) ; and a socketed Hammer 
(No. 175) formed part of the founder's hoard found at Donhead, 
and is now in the Farnham Museum. These are in each case the 
only examples of the type recorded from the county. 

Of socketed Sickles, the socket portion of one (No. 17G), from 

Alderbury, is in the Blackn)ore Museum (Plate VI., Fig. 3), and 

a very remarkable specimen (No. 177) with a loop at the back of 

the socket, a feature unknown in any other recorded example, from 

Winterbourne Monkton, is in the collection of IMr. J. \\ . lirooke, 

I at Marlborough (Flale III., Fig. S). These Sickles are, like (he 

! preceding socketed iniplonionl.s, oL' tlic latest period of the Bioiize 

I Age. 

Of sockettMl S|)t',iili(Mils only (M;_,^]ittHMi in all have lu>cii rcconlcd 
from tlu^ cDiiiitN', o\chi(iin^ tlic numerous reforcuces to " Jirass 



104 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

Spearheads " and " Lanceheads " in Hoare, Stukeley, &c., which, as 
has been already stated, should be interpreted in all probability 
for the most part rather as Daggers than Spears. 

Seven of these are small socketed heads with loops half-way up 
the sockets, and in most cases slender narrow blades (Plate V., 
Fig. 2) (No. 181), varying from Sin. to 5in. in total length. One 
from near Beckhampton (IsTo. 184) has a shorter leaf-shaped blade.^ 




Socketed Spearhead. Down S.W. of Beckhampton. \ (No. 184). 

According to Canon Greenwell's classification these Spear and 
Lance heads with the loops half-way up the socket probably 
represent the oldest type,^ at present known from the county, though 
even these are not earlier than the earlier part of Period V. 

Of the next type, where the loops have moved up to the base of 
the blade, we have the fine example (]^o. 191) from Wilcot, now 
at Devizes, measuring 14|in. in length, the largest Spearhead found 
in the county. In this example the loops adjoin the base of the 
blade, but are not yet incorporated with it. In the two fine 

^ Canon Green well, in his valuable paper in Archoeologia^ LXI., 451, on 
" The Origin, Evolution, and Classification of the Bronze Spearhead in Great 
Britain and Ireland," says : — " There can be no doubt whatever that the 
Spearhead in its origin, progress, and final consummation, was an indigenous 
product of Great Britain and Ireland, and M'as manufactured within their 
limits apart from any controlling influence from outside." "The looped 
type in all its forms is one which originated in and was exclusively used in 
the United Kingdom, none having been found outside these islands, except 
a few which have occurred principally in the northern part of France, into 
which country they were doubtless imported. A few heads with loops on 
the socket have also been found at Mycenae and in Hungary ; there are also 
other scattered instances, but these loops probably served some other 
purpose than that of attaching the head to the shaft." 

^ No examples of what Canon Greenwell regards as the earlier types, the 
Dagger-like blade with a long rivetted tang, such as those of Arreton Down 
and Newbury, without a ferrule ; the similar blade with a ferrule, like that 
at Snowshill ; the blade in which the socket still simulates a ferrule ; or 
tliat in which the loops occur at the base of the socket, seem to be known 
from Wiltshire. 



By the Rev. E. IT. Goddard. 105 

examples from Brigmerston (No. 189) and Wiiiterbourne Basset 
(No. 190, Plate V., Fig. 1), the loops have become " protected," 
that is, they are included in the general outline of the blade, and 
have the lozenge-shaped coverings at right angles to the plane of 
the blade, which were liammered out after the casting of the blade. 
The former of these, that from l>rigmerston, now in the British 
Museum, is remarkable for the very rare feature of a band of 
engraved chevron and horizontal line ornament round the base of 
the socket. 

Of the latest type, where the loops have degenerated into lunate 
openings in the blade, a single fragment of a Idade from Brig- 
merston (No. 192) is in the British Museum: whilst of the simple 
leaf-shaped head, without loops at all, and a riveted socket, which 
continued in use down to the end of the Bronze Age, only one 
example also is known, that from Wootton Bassett (No. 188), now 
at Devizes (Plate IV., Fig. 4). This rarity of the later forms of 
Spearhead which occur so frequently elsewhere in the founders' 
hoards and casual finds, is of a piece with the curious scarcity or 
absence in Wilts of so many of the typical implements and weapons 
of Period V., which has already been remarked. 

There remains to be noticed the curious specimen (No. 195), 
said to have been ploughed up at Battlesbury Camp, near War- 
minster, and now in the Blackmore Museum (Plate YL, Fig. 5). 
It is of a yellow brassy colour unpatinated. It has a short broad 
flat blade bevelled at the edge and rounded at the point, a promi- 
nent rounded midrib, and a long socket with a beaded rim at the 

j base and a collar Imll'-way u]) it. I can find nothing at all like it 
in lu'ans, or in any museum. As Dr. lilackmore regards it as 

. anti(|ue, 1 Iuiao thoui-ht it best to li^urc it hero, thou<di I myself 
have grave doulits as to its auliiiuity. 

. Of [\n' cyliiidrical olijocls with jdcjocling spila's, known as 
"Mace Heads," the l)ritisli Mus.'uni has a sjummiiumi (No. 178), 
with tw(^ rows of spikes, '-s.iid to lia\(' biM'ii fduiid in a well" at 
Groat i'xMlwyii. This is l!io laily exaiiiph' whirh has cccurit'tl in 
the county. Sii .h.hn l']\aiis (h'os not ro-anl t ln'S(> objects as of 
the Ih'on/.e \'j-(\ ihouudi ihcN' are coiinnoiih- classed as sucii. 



106 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

A bronze mould for Celts (N"o. 170), uow at Farnham, was in- 
eluded in the Bonhead founders' hoard ; another in the British 
Museum (No. 171), labelled as "found in Wiltshire/' has the two 
halves of the mould joggled together, and has upon it a cast of the 
twine with which the model was bound. 

The only stone mould for bronze implements which appears to 
have been recorded for Wilts is that of syenite found at Bulford, 
formerly in the Lake House Collection, and now at Farnham 
Museum. It is remarkable as being for two socketed Celts, one 
with one loop the other with two. Celts of the latter type are 
extremely rare, and no double-looped example has ever been found 
in Wiltshire. 

Six of the thin blades with long tangs and sometimes with 
thickened midribs, known as " Eazors,'' are recorded from the 
county, three of which are at Farnham, two at Devizes, and one 




(No. 200.) Razor. Barrow on Rollestone Down. ^ 

at the Ashmolean. The latter of these (No. 202), from Winterslow 
Hut Barrow, has an oval blade with regular longitudinal ribs like 
a plantain leaf. Two, from Beckhampton Down, (No. 197, Plate 
II., Fig. 9), and from a barrow on Eollestoii Down (No. 200), have 
more or less semi-circular blades, and two others, both from the 
ditch of South Lodge Camp, Kushmore, have very thin oval blades 
(Nos. 198, 199), the one with a notch at the top, the other without 
it. The first of these is the largest specimen from Wilts, measuring 
4Jin. X Ifin. The sixth example, found " near Stonehenge " (No. 
201), consists of little more than the midrib, the blade being broken 
away. 

Montelius assigns these Kazors to Periods lY. and V., in company 
with Palstaves, Leaf-shaped Swords, Eapier-shaped Daggers, and 
socketed looped Spearheads. If this classification is to be strictly 



By the Rev. E. II. Goddard. 



107 



adhered to, the presence of liazors in the two barrows mentioned 
above, if they were really associated with the primary interments, 
would seem to assign these barrows to that later period of the 
Bronze Age, interments of which have been hitherto sought in vain. 

Two othei- bronze blades which perhaps should be classed with 
Eazors, call for notice. From the barrow on Eoundway Hill, in 
company with the largest of the tanged flat daggers, of Period I., 
comes the long awl-like tang and a small portion of the base of 
what seems to have been a thin double-edged blade (No. 204). 
What was the shape of this blade there is nothing to show. None 
of the " liazors " have a narrow tang of this kind. The metal of 
whicli this fragment is composed is of a very red colour, looks like 
Copper, and doubtless is so, for the accompanying Dagger has been 
proved to be of Copper, without any Tin. 

Another small blade (No. 203), from a barrow south of Eobin 
Hood's Ball, on Salisbury Plain, measuring Ifin. x fin., has a 
sliort tang pierced with a single rivet hole, and a small flat thin 
blade. This is placed by Thurnam and Evans with the " Eazors," 
together with a larger but very similar blade from Lady Low, in 
Staffordshire. 

Single-edged (?) Knives are represented only by one fragment 
from the downs near Avebury, of a bevelled blade which did not 
belong to a Dagger (No. 205). 

The smallest of the bronze blades are those of the so-called 

"Lancets" (Nos. 206, 207), from the barrows at Manton and at 

! Normanton, liarrow 155, which produced such rich finds of gold 

ornaments. Those little blades, about Vm. in length, are set at 




(No. J<i7-^ "Lancet." Normanton I^ar. 155. 

right-an'j,it's in small haiidh's, in tlit' oiit^ case of amber lioiind with 
gold lillcls, in tJic oilier (»!" wood oi- somo otlicr su])stam'c ontiicly 
encased in a thin L;oltl cuNtT. No other examples of these little 
implenieuLs are known. 



108 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

Tanged chisels with a long tang and fan-shaped blade are rare 
in England. Montelius assigns them to Periods IV. and V. of the 
Bronze Age. A fine example (No. 210, Plate IL, Fig. 1), horn 
Kennet, is in Mr. J. W. Brooke's Collection, and a smaller spade- 
shaped implement, from Oldbury (ISTo. 208, Plate II., Fig. 6), are 
the only two of this type certainly recorded for Wiltshire, but in 
the Stourhead Collection is an example exactly resembling that 
from Kennet, but smaller, from an unknown locality, possibly 
Wiltshire. 

There is also the curious little chisel with broad semicircular 
cutting edge and tang (No. 209), still fixed in its stag'shorn handle, 
from Barrow 2, near Sidbury Hill. The length of the bronze is 
Ifin. 




(No. 209.) Small Tang-ed Chisel. Barrow near Sidbury \\i\\. 

Chisels with straight narrow blades, have occurred in perhaps 
four instances, one (No. 214), in a barrow at Lake, with a blade 
about Jin. wide, is in the British Museum, another (No. 213), found 
near Stonehenge, is at Farnham. In several instances, however, 
it is difficult to say whether an implement should be regarded as 
a narrow Chisel or as a large Awl or Rimer. Such is the specimen 
from Beckhampton (No. 211), with one end flat and the other of 
square section. Which end was intended for use ? In this case 
the superior preservation of the square-sectioned end suggests that 
this was the end enclosed in the handle (Plate IL, Fig. 10). 

Of small Awls or Prickers about thirty-nine seem to be recorded, 
many of them under the name of " Pins," in Ancient Wilts and 
elsewhere. Most of these have flat tangs ; others are pointed at 
both ends. One retains portions of its wooden handle (No. 253)^ 



Awl in wooden handle. Locality unknown. -— 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard, 



109 




^^ Jil llalt;4la.^^iA^^^llll^l^il0l■»l'<»u' 



(No. 252.) Awl in bone handle. VVinteibouine Stoke Bar. 16. — 

another (No. 252), from a barrow at Winterbourne Stoke, is in a 
well-made handle of bono {fi[j.). 

Of the Awls or Eimers of stouter make and of square section 
(Nos. 254 — 257), tapering from the centre towards each end, four 
are known, all of which are broken (Plate V., Figs. 3, 4). Another 
(No. 257), 2|in. long, round, but with a square tang, is in Mr. 
Brooke's Collection. Another large stout implement (No. 259) is 
round, with a flat tang. 



(No. 259.) Round flat tang-ed Awl. From Barrow at Lake. ^ 

Two examples at Devizes, one of them from a barrow at 
Scratchbury (No. 260) and the second from an unknown locality 
probably in Wiltshire, are twisted like a screw, and it has been 
suggested that they may have served as Gimlets. Possibly designed 
— as Dr. Thurnam suggests — for this purpose also, are certain Pins 
with a T-shaped or " crutched " head, and a spiral screw on the 
stem. Of these two have occurred in barrows (No. 261, 262) at 
Silk Hill and on Overton Hill. The former is here figured. A 
fact, however, which rather militates against the idea that these 
implements are borers is that two pins of exactly similar fashion, 
except that the stems are plain and not twisted, are also preserved 




(No. 263.) Crutched i)lain Pin. Norinanton Bar. 139. \ 



(No. 2^.1.) Crutclicd Screw Pin. Barrow on Silk Hill. 

at Devizes (Xo. -G-">), one, \\civ ligimnl, from a l);nrow al Nor- 
nKinlon, thr otiirr fioiii an unknown loraHly, piul)cil)ly in Willshiic 
Tlicy vary in Icn-tli iVoni l^in. to (Jin. 



110 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

From Eushall Down, a casual find, comes a remarkable Pin 
(No. 268), 6 Jin. long, the head like a round flat tray l|^in. in 
diameter, with a raised rim surrounding sixteen small cones with 
blunt tops set on the flat tray. Half-way down the stem is the 
rare feature of a loop, broken (Plate IV., Fig. 6). I^o other Pin 
with a head quite like this seems to be known, though Pins with 
loops on their stems have been found. There is, however, in the 
British Museum (No. 269) another Pin from " South Wilts," with 
a similar circular tray-like head, but without the cones, and with 
a baluster stem without the loop. 

Three Pins with flat round plain heads (Nos. 264 — 266), the 
longest about 6in., the others shorter, also from " South Wilts," 
are in the British Museum, and another with a round flat head 
and a knob on the stem, was found in a barrow at Scratchbury 
(No. 267). A Pin with a plain round knob head, about 2in. long, 
from "South Wilts" (No. 270), is in the British Museum. 




(No. 271.) Everley Bar. 24. ^ 

A very curious Pin, 6 Jin. long (No. 271), with a head formed of 
two circular rings, from each of which a smaller ring hangs, had 
apparently been enclosed in a wooden sheath lined with cloth, 
and was not therefore a hair pin. It was found with a cremated 
interment in a barrow near Sidbury Hill. No other example is 
known. 

There is also in the Stourhead Collection, from some unknown 
locality, very probably in Wiltshire, a Pin with the head widening 



(No. 273.) Shepherd's Shore. 1911. \ 

out into a large flattened ring (No. 272). It is 5|in. in length. A 



By the Rev. E, H, GoddarcL 



111 



very similar Pin, with the head beaten out flat and thin, 4]in. long 
has quite recently (1911) been added to the Museum. It was found 
casually by a shepherd near Shepherd's Shore (No. 273). 

Of articles of personal adornment the most notable are the 
Armlets, or BraceletSj^of which twelve are recorded from Wiltshire, 
chiefly of the two types here illustrated. Seven of these (Nos. 
277—283), two of which are in the Blackmore Museum, and five 
at Devizes, are from barrows near Lake. They are penannular 
bracelets of plain strong thick bronze, square or oval in section. 





(No. 276.) lianow near Lake. \ (No. 277.) Barrow near Lake, i 

Three others are made of broad bands of bronze, also penannular, 
two of them (Nos. 275, 276), from South Lodge Camp, at Kushmore 
and from a barrow at Lake, have their surface fluted or channelled, 
while the tliird (No. 274), found on the arm of a skeleton in a 
barrow at Amesbury, is a broad flat band of bronze l-Hn. wide, with 
the ends overlapping, the surface engraved with four horizontal 
bands of vertical lines. 

Two fragments of a ]]racelet formed of twisted bronze wire 
(No. 284), with hook fastenings, from a barrow at Amesbury, are 
in the Stourhead Collection, which apparently were found by Hoare 
in an inverted urn containing burnt bones in a barrow. 

Three spiral Kings of strong bronze of three or four coils eacli, 
wliich may have been finger rings, or possibly ornaments, were 
found in connection witli tlie plain Ijracelets mentioned above, and 
the Tor(iu('s nicnlioneil Ixilow, in a barrow or ])arrow.s near Lalu*. 
It is very greatly to be regretted that no account is i)re.served of 
th(' circunistancc^s under which these Ih'acelets, Kings, and I'oniucs 

' TluTi' arc ill the ilrilisli .M iiseuin a sot of |,^)l(l hract'lcts t'oiiiul at Tishury 
of ilitreri-nt tyi»cs, Kut in tht'sc notes objects of .i^old have not l>eeii coiisiihTcil. 



112 Notes on Implements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

were discovered. No other barrow in Wiltshire has yielded any- 
thing of the kind. 

The three funicular Bronze Torques (Nos. 289 — 291), the only 
examples found in the county, of which one is now in the Blackmore 
Museum and a second in the Farnham Museum, are all said to have 
been found in " Barrows near Lake." Such Torques are assigned 
by Montelius to Period III. 

Three specimens (or ? only two) of the small penannular Eings 
known as Eing Money (Nos. 292 — 294), of bronze plated with a 
thin covering of gold, have been found at different times at or near 
Bishopstone, S. Wilts (Plate YII., Fig. 14). 

Also formed of a bronze core with thin covering of gold is the 




(No. 295.) Bronze Horns plated with Gold. Normanton Bar. 155.^ — 

curious little pair of horns, if the ornament may be so described, 
here illustrated (No. 295). It was found in a barrow at Normanton, 
near Stonehenge. It seems to be the only example of its kind 
known. 

Perhaps, however, the most remarkable thing found in the 
county is the prong-shaped object (No. 296), here figured. 

The two tines of the prong — for it resembles an ordinary agri- 
cultural prong more than anything else — are of strong twisted 
bronze of square section, the points curving upwards exactly as 
those of a prong do. Although the points themselves are gone, it 
is evident that this curve is original and not accidental. It is 
clear, too, that the points never joined and formed a ring, as 
some writers have supposed. It seems, again, to have no affinity 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 113 

with the " spur " or " prong-shaped " objects in the Dublin Museum, 
which are supposed to have been intended for the decoration of 




(No. 296.) Prongr-shaped implement from Barrow at Wilsford. \ 

liorses' heads. In fact no other known object appears to be at all 
like it. It was certainly intended to be fastened to a handle by 
the tang which projects from the central pierced plate. This tang 
is now broken oil' across the line of three rivet holes, and tlie 
rounded end of it (here indicated by a dotted line), shown in 
Hoare's engraving/ is unfortunately lost, together with the pin or 
rivet whicli he also shows as still occupying the central hole. Tliis 
rivet appears to have been a long one without head, like the rivet 
of a Spearhead, and argues a rouiul wooden handle and possibly a 
ferruh^ of bron/e. lloare shows a detaclicd fragment of the end 
of the righl-liand line, also now missing. On the other hand the 
ornamentation of engraNcd hatched vaiidj'kes that surroiuhls t lie 
opening in the centre on both sides of tlio implement is not shown 



.1. ir., I., -JO}), V\. \xi.\. 



vol,. XX.WII. — Nil. ( W 



114 Notes on Im'plcments of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

by Hoare, having been cleared of incrustation since his time. The 
three links of chain hanging from the central hole are not the 
least remarkable portion of the implement. No explanation of 
their use has ever been suggested, except the obvious remark that 
they are " for suspension," and the two outer links were certainly 
cast together, as they show no sign whatever of junction. The 
link which connects them with the central hole, on tlie other hand, 
has a lump of incrustation on it whicli may 'possibly conceal a 
junction, but even supposing this to be the case the casting of this 
implement is a sufficiently remarkable achievement for the 2nd 
Period of the Bronze Age, to which, apparently, the skeleton lying 
on the floor of a large bell-shaped barrow, at Wilsford, belonged, 
at whose feet this Prong, together with a bronze slightly -flanged 
Celt (N"o. 105), a perforated stone Hammer-Axe, a bone Pipe, a bone 
handle of some implement, a large boar's tusk, and a grooved 
Whetstone were found. 

This almost completes the list of Bronze objects found in the 
county. Certain strips of thin Bronze with twenty-nine rivets, 
found in a barrow with remains of wood (No. 297), were supposed 
by Hoare to be portions of a shield, whilst other rivets and strips 
from another barrow (No. 298) were taken to belong to a wooden 
box which had contained the cremated interment. Some wire 
(No. 299) was found in the founders' hoard at Donliead ; a per- 
forated oval stone hammer found at Bush Barrow, had traces of a 
Bronze mount (No. 300) adhering to the stone ; and various inde- 
terminate " fragments of bronze " (No. 302), which have not been 
preserved, are recorded as having been found in barrows. 

Having dealt with the objects which have been found, a word 
may be said on those wliich have not as yet occurred within the 
borders of the county. No Halberd, tanged Dagger or Spearhead 
with rivet hole in the long narrow tang, looped Bracelet, socketed 
Dagger, tanged Sickle, Rapier, Scabbard-tip, Ferrule for Spear, 
tanged Gouge, Shield, Trumpet, Horse Bit, socketed Knife, Situla, 
or Bracelet with trumpet-shaped ends (of hronze) has ever been 
recorded. 

Speaking generally, as has been said above, the county of Wilts 



By the liev. E. H. Goddanl. 115 

is incomparably richer in the implements of the first two periods 
than in those of the last three. 



In addition to the l^ronze objects, Plate VII., FigH. 13 and 15, 
shows two objects of lignite or shale. They are specimens of the 
conical Jjutton or ]>oss with converging perforations on its flat 
base, and the King with peculiar holes in the thickness of the edge, 
communicating with each other, which has been called, for want 
of a better name, a " Pulley Pting." Several of these have been 
found in the barrows of Wiltshire, almost always in association 
with one another, so that it seems most probable that they formed 
together a fastening for the dress, though how the ring was used 
is not known. These specimens were found with an interment' 
doubtless of 1st Period of the Bronze Age, under a large Sarsen 
stone at Winterbourne Monkton, in N. Wilts, in 1856, and are now 
in Devizes Museum. The " button " is of brown shale, and is 
l)robably the largest specimen of the type known. The ring, 
on the otlier hand, is of a substance closely resembling jet, 
though Dr. Thurnam came to the conclusion that none of the many 
beads and ornaments of so-called jet found in Wiltshire were really 
made of that material, but of various kinds of lignite, and shale, 
more easily procurable in tliis part of England. 



In one respect Wiltshire has been singuhirly fortunate. 
l*r()])al)ly no otlier county in England has retained such a large 
j)roj)ortion of its ])rehi.storic aiiliiiuities williin its own l)orders. 
The l)ril,ish Muscuin jjossesses th(^ greater jiait of (,lii^ eollectioii 
formed l)y llie iJe\ . Mdward Dul^'e, of Lal<e. aiuMias also ol her 
valuable speeiuieiis, obtained by pureliase or by gift ; but the great 
nia jorit )', of t lie objects of the Xeolilliie and Ibon/.e Age ]>eriods dis- 
covere(l in \\'iltsliii v during I lie last eenlury — though il is true mam 

1 '1 



116 Notes on Ini'plements of the Bronze Age found in Wiltshire. 

have been hopelessly lost — are still to be found in the museums of 
the county, either at Salisbury, or at Devizes, or in the museum 
founded by Gen. Pitt Eivers at Farnham, just over the county 
boundary in Dorset, which contains the whole of the proceeds of 
his own extensive excavations. The most important private 
collections containing Wiltshire objects of these periods are those 
of Mr. J. W. Brooke, of Marlborough, and Mr. A. D. Passmore, of 
Swindon, both happily within the county, where it is greatly to be 
hoped that these collections may always remain. 



[I have to thank Mr. J. W. Brooke, r.S.A. (Scot.), of Marlborough, 
for drawings of three objects from his collection here reproduced ; 
the remainder of the illustrations, with the exception of six blocks 
in the text, reduced from illustrations in Ancient Wilts, are from 
my own pen-and-ink sketches. I have also to thank Dr. Blackmore, 
of Salisbury, not only for permission to draw and describe many 
objects in the Blackmore Museum, but also for much information 
as to the Bronze objects in his charge as Curator.] 




Fig. 16. 




Fig. .7. 




Fig. iS. 



Fig. lO. — Bruu/A- !'M.iii.i;fil Crll, W. I .,i\ m-lon Mown, near New Copse, h. 

Fig. 17. — Hioii/r C'l-ll. A\ cluir\ . [. I'il;. 1 >. iWon/r Tulstave. 

|)()\vn.-> above l,a\ini;toii. \ 




Fig. 9. 







Fig. 10. 




Fig. II, 




! 11- Fi-. ij. 

Fij;- '>• I'loiiz.- K'.izoi-. lH'ckli,im|.t,),i houiis. | 

Fig. 10.— Small I'.roiizc Chisel. iM-ckhaiiinton Hown 

Fig. II.— lirou/f Cioiiqp. (Ilill)iii \-. j 

Fig. !.». — Bronze Socket. -.1 I.oopnl r.lt. TnupK-. f 




Fig. 6. 




Fig. 7. 




•E 111. 

Fig. 0, 
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-Bronze Taiigf.l Chisel. ( )l.ll.iirv. [ 
-Hron/r Hro.ul-l.l ul.-.l Clu-cl. Kciim-t. | 
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NOTES. 
Silver Seal found at Potterne. A silver seal set with an 

intaglio found many years ago at Potterne has recently been acquired 
by the British Museum. Whether this is the seal referred to in Wilts 
Arch. Ma(j., i., 57, or xxxii., 239, I cannot say. The seal I now refer to 
is said to have been found in " Great Orchard," a field in the middle of 
the village in which stood the crenellated mansion of the Bishops of 
Salisbury which was demolished at the time of the Commonwealth. 
The occupier of the field who found the seal kept it till his death. It 
was occasionally shown to friends, and referred to as the " Bishop's 
Seal. It is, however, very doubtful whether it ever belonged to any 
bishop. 

Some years ago it was shown to Mr. Ready, who wrote as 
folk)ws : — "Its owner was William Pagnell, Lord of Fordington (a 
l)rebend of the Cathedral Church of Salisbury) in 1301. It is one of 
the seals appended to the Barons' letter to Pope Boniface VIII. I have 
the whole of them, one hundred and seventeen in number, some very 
large, nearly all the nobility of that period. Littleton Panel, or Pagnell, 
in Bishoi)s Lavington, belonged to the family of William Pagnell." 

This was written apparently in entire confidence and belief that it 
was correct. Littleton Panel is only four miles from Potterne, and this 
seemed to lend confirmation to the story. 

Some doubt, however, was recently thrown upon the tale, and the 
authorities of the British Museum were consulted. This is Avhat is 
now said : — " The story is entirely wrong. It has nothing to do with 
any ^\'illiam Pagnell and was not one of the seals appended to the 
Barons' Letter to Boniface VIII." It is now described as "a silver 
seal of the 13th century with loop for suspension in the form of a 
monster's head. It is set with a jasper engraved with a mounted 
figure in the late Roman period and bears the following inscription in 
mediieval Latin, 'Qua; tibi lego lege'— 'what 1 read to you, read.' 
The inscription is rather puzzling. The usual thing is * tecta lege, 
lecta tege,' which gives an obvious sense." 

1 send an impression of it to the Museum. H. E. Medlicott. 

Broad Hinton. A small folio Black Letter Jiook of Common Prayer, 
printed by Bell and Barker, London, 1674 (Charles II. 's edition), bearing 
the following inscriptions : — 
"This service book was bought for ye pish of Broad-lliuton agst 

Kaster in ye year 1676. Hen. Dudley Vicar " 
"This ])ooke now belongs to Mr. Henry Dudley, Wvat of Uroad 
lliuton, May the last day in ye year l()y(). Henry DudK'V, Ano 
Dili, lf)JJO." 
has been recently (May, 1911), jiurchased from a bookseller in Edinburgh, 
an<l replaced among the possessions of the Church at Broad llinton. 

I'J). 11. (Joi)l>AKI). 



160 



Notes. 



Tropenell Family Deeds. A small folio MS. book, bound in 

boards, of 82 pages, marked on the back " Cartse Antiqnsede Tropenell 
familia," was purchased at the recent sale of a portion of the libraiT of 
the late Sir Thomas Phiilipps by Mr. J. Benett-Stanford, of Hatcii 
House, Tisbury, and is now in his possession. This volume contains 
transcripts of a number of deeds connected with the Tropenell family . 
which do not appear to be included in the Tropenell Cartulary, pub- 1 
lished 1908. It also includes Notes on the Tropenell Pedigree, which do i 
appear in that book (Vol. II., pp. 162). 
Potterne, the Second Bell. In the account of Potterne Churcli 
iu Wilts Arch. Mag., xvi., 281, the inscription on ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
given erroneously. The inscription given on the plate is evidenty 
copied from Luki's's block, and this has appeared -^-^f P^^^^^^^^ 
since that time and many attempts have been made ^o exp am it Th 
block now given is a reduction from a tracing of a careful rubbing mad 
by myself. Of course the marks on the bell are all m one line and not 
in three as given here. 




I— It 






I do not think that the letters and marks on this bell have any 
ticular meaning ; unless perhaps the H. A. and N. A. may be someon 

""The^first mark appears to be a small vase or ornament of some s 
the second possibly some trade mark, the next may be two 7s. fl 
tu ned sTdeways, and the next letters H. A. Then follow two mercha 
marks an F. reversed, and the impression of some solid disc (notanf 
and lastly the letters N. A. 

I do not think the bell is older than the latter part of the sixtee^^ 
or early part of the seventeenth century. This is not the only case, 
which odd letters and marks are found impressed upon b^^l^ JjJ; 
any apparent meaning. J . . e 



Notes. 161 

Eteg-ister of the Committee of Sequestration for 

Wilts, temp. Commonwealth, in Wilts Arch. Mag., xxvi., 
343—391, the late late Mr. J. Waylen i)rinted under the title, " The 
Falstone Day Book," a copious series of transcriptions or abstracts of 
Wiltshire Sequestrations, which he had copied many years before from 
a MS. in " the possession of a professional gentleman at Salisbury 
whose name I do not accurately remember." The Rev. R. E. H. Duke, 
of Maltby Rectory, Lines., has recently identified the MS. from which 
these transcriptions were made as " The Register of the Committee of 
Sequestration for Wilts, additional MSS., No. 22,085," in the British 
Museum. It was purchased from Messrs. Squarey & Whatman, of 
Salisbury, on Uth July, 1857. Enquiries at Salisbury have failed to 
elicit any further facts as to the ownership or history of this MS. which 
was probably sold by auction by Messrs. Squarey in the way of business. 
The transcription made by Mr. Waylen and printed in the Magazine is 
by no means a full one. There are considerable omissions and the whole 
is much shortened. Mr. Duke also calls the attention of enquirers into 
the history of the Rising of 1654-5 to the fact that some of the In- 
quisitions into the Royalists' estates, not all of them, are to be found 
in the Index entitled " Special Commission and Depositions Exchequer, 
Commonwealth, Wilts," in the legal room in the Record Office, and also 
to the fact that the Letters to Prince Rupert, Additional MSS. 18, 981, 
in the British Museum, contains correspondence from Wiltshire 
Royalists. 

Join of Cuthred King of Kent 798—807. In Spinks 

List for June, 1910, occurs the following : — 
Obverse— -j- cvdred rex ca!st 

Diademed bust to right. 
Reverse — + verheardi moneta. 

Cross pommee over cross pattee. 
Found at Tockenham, near Wootton Bassett, Wilts, Price -£9. 
' A. D. Passmore. 

ffanx Shearwater at Wootton Bassett. A Manx 

Shearwater {Puffinus Anglorum) was picked up in Mr. H. Bevir's field 
at VV ootton Bassett, after the great storm on Monday morning (Aug. 
29th, 1910), and identified by me. Smith's Jh'rds of Wiltshire only 
gives two instances of its occurrence in the county, which is not strange 
considering its inhmd situation and the bird's pelagic habits. The bird 
lias been preserved and is in the possession of Mr. Bevir. 

D. Percy Harrison. 

•led PlycatCher. Isawa Pied FlycatchuT {Muscicnpaatricapill>i) 
here [I.ydiard Millicent] on Saturday, May Ttli, 191(>. It was just 
outside my gate in some beech trees opposite the churchyard, though 
owing to the bitter N.W. gale which was raging it mostly sheltered 

j under the lee of a low stone wall. It remained all day, but on the 

DL. XXXVII. — NO. rxv. ^l 



162 Notes. 

Sunday morning it was gone. The violent gale had doubtless driven 
it out of its course, which would have lain more to the west, or else 
hindered its further progress towards Yorkshire, where the species is 
locally not uncommon. It was a male bird. 

D. P. Harrison. 
CrOld Biingf found at Grittleton. A massive gold signet ring 
was found some time ago by a farmer at Grittleton and sold by him 
to Mr. Horstmann, jeweller of 13, Union Street, Bath. It bears a. 
shield of arms quarterly, and the following posy or motto is engraved 
on the inside of the ring : — 

"Tried with the Giver's love 
The Gould but drosse will prove." 
The British Museum authorities assign it to the early part of the 
seventeenth century, whilst the inscription may be a little later. 

I am indebted for the above' information to Mr. S. G. Perceval, who 
also sent an impression of the seal. This I submitted to the Rev. E. E. 
Dorling, F.S.A. He writes : " The first and fourth quarters seem to 
be a ring in a border with molets. I can find no such coat either in 
English or Scottish heraldry. If the second and third quarters are a 
chevron- ermine between three cocks that may be the coat of Gokyn of 
Bekesborne in Kent ; but I cannot distinguish exactly what the charges 
are." 

Ed. H. Goddard. 

Xiicenses granted to open Barrows or " Howes " in 

the 13th century. In vol, xxxvi. p. 627 of this Magazine 
mention is made of the fact that licenses were formally granted by the 
Crown in the JM iddle Ages to dig for treasure in barrows, as possibly 
accounting in many cases for the rifling of these sepulchral mounds, 
before the archaeologist came on the scene. Mr. A. S. Maskelyne, of 
the Record Office, has kindly given me the following copies of such 
licenses to open " Howes " in Cornwall and the Isle of Wight : — 
" De hogis in comitatu Cornubie fodendis. 

"Rex mandavit [comiti] Cornubie et Pictavie quod fodi faciat 
hogas in comitatu Cornubie ad thesaurum in eis querendum, sicut' 
mandavit fieri de hogis in insula de Wicht'. Teste ut supra [viz 
apud Kenyt' {Kempton) xvij die Aprilis (21 Henry III.), 1237J." 

" De hogis in insula de Wyght'. Rex comiti Cornubie, salutem. 
Quid datum est nobis intelligi quod quidam de insula de Wight 
foderunt hogas quasdam ibidem pro thesauro ibidem querendo vos 
attente rogamus quatinus f estinetis quantum poteritis accedere ad 
partes illas et inquiratis diligenter de fossoribus predictis qui fuerint, 
et si quid in hogis illis invenerint ; et illos attachiari faciatis ad 
respondendum coram nobis de facto suo quando preceperimus. Hogas 
• illas etiam que nondum sunt fosse ibidem fodi faciatis ad videndum 
si thesaurus aliquis in eis absconditus, ut pro loco et tempore nos 
possitis inde certificare. Teste ut supra. [As above.] 

Close Rolls. Printed. 
Ed. H. Goddard. 



163 



WILTS OBITUAPtY. 
lev. Frederick William Reade, died December, nth, i9io, 

aged 63. St. Alban Hall, Oxon., B.A. 1870, M.A. (Merton Coll.) 1893. 
Deacon 1872 (Ex.) ; Priest 1873 (Cant.) Curate of Calstock (Corn.) 
1872 ; E. Mailing (Kent) 1872—75 ; H. Trin. Haverstock Hill, 1876— 
79 ; Norden (Lanes.), 1879—84 ; St. Thos., Pendleton (Lanes.), 1885— 
89 ; Hambledon (Bucks), 1889-94 ; Vicar of Wolford (Worcs.), 1898— 
1903 ; Eector of Kushall 1903 until his death. During his incumbency 
the Church of Rushall which was in a very bad condition was well and 
completely restored. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, December 15th, 1910. 

•. Delme Awdry, died December 7th, 1910. Buried at West 
Tytherton. Son of Peter Awdry, solicitor, at Chippenham. For 
many years LTnder Sheriff of Wilts. Much liked and respected by 
those who came in contact with him in business. Died unmarried. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, December 8th, 1910. 

ev. "William Esdaile Burkitt, died December, 1910. Ex. 
Coll. Oxon. B.A. 1857. Deacon 1856, Priest 1857 (Llandaff). Curate 
of Caldicot (Mon.), 1856 — 59 ; Charlton (Wilts), and Chaplain to Earl 
Nelson, 1859 ; Vicar of Charlton 1859—69 ; Rector of Buttermere, 1869 
until his death. Guardian and District Councillor for Buttermere. 
He was best known as an enthusiastic bee-keeper, and for many 
years no bee tent at any agricultural show in Wiltshire was complete 
without him as a practical demonstrator of the art of apiculture. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, December 15th, 1910. 

Villiam Sweetland, died at Bath Oct. 21st, 1910, aged 90. A 
native of Devizes. He early displayed an extraordinary talent for 
making musical instruments, having made a violin at 11, a 'cello at 12, 
and a harp at 13. He was apprenticed to Mr. Sherborne, an organ 
builder, of Bath, and at the end of his apy)renticeship set up on his own 
account at Bath, where he lived for the rest of his life. His organs, the 
first of which was made for St. Michaels Church, l:)ath, in 1849, were 
well known and highly spoken of. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Oct. 29th, 1910. 

'Hannah Gouldsmith. Died Oct. 15th, 1910, aged 72. Buried at 
Lacock. Widow of .lesse Gouldsmith, formerly of Bodwell Hall, 
Trowl)ii(lge, which she left some years ago to reside in London. The 
erection of the Cottage Hospital at Trowbridge, 1883—86, was due to 
the generosity of Mr. Gouldsmith and of his widow after his death. 
Slu; also founded the .sou]> kitchen in 1888, and was well known for her 
kindness and generosity. She leaves three sons and one ilaughter — 
Mrs. G. LI. Palmer, of Lackliam. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Tiiats, Oti. 22nil, JDlo. 

M •_' 



164 Wilts Obituary. 

Penelope Frances Murray, died Oct. 4tli, 1910, at Bath. Buried 

at Southfleet, Kent. Daughter of Brigadier-General John Austin^ 
K.C.T.S., she married, 1848, Rev. George Edward Murray, Rector of 
Southfleet, Kent, and after his death, in 1854, she came to Calne and 
lived at Castle House, removing after many years to The Highlands^ 
and finally some five years ago, to Bath. She was a constant and most 
generous supporter of all religious and charitable organizations con- 
nected with the Church in Calne. The reredos in the Parish Church, 
erected at a cost of £600, was her gift. St. Mary's School for Girls, 
established in 1873 in order to provide a secondary education on Church 
of England lines, was one of the greatest interests of her life, and she 
was one of its chief founders, and most regular and generous supporters. 
Much beloved and greatly respected in Calne. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 13th, 1910. 

Iiady JDlIeuX, widow of Sir Henry Meux, 3rd and last baronet, died 
Dec. 20th, 1910. Buried at Cheshunt Parish Church. Married as 
Miss Valerie Susie Langdon in 1878 to Sir Henry Meux, who, on his 
death, childless, on January 11th, 1900, left her the whole of his 
property. She thus became one of the richest women in England. Her 
very extensive estates in Wiltshire, with the exception of Dauntsey 
House, and some other property, were sold a few years ago, and she 
had lived of late years, at Theobalds House, Herts, where she had 
collected a considerable museum of Egyptian antiquities. She was much 
interested in racing, and bred the Derby winner, Volodyovski, of 1901 ; 
running horses herself under the name of " Mr. Theobalds." During 
the South African War she presented a battery to the nation at a cost 
of perhaps £20,000. By her will she left her collection of 1800 Egyptian 
and Assyrian antiquities to the British Museum, on condition that it 
should be kept together in a suitable position, whilst Whistler's "Sable 
Picture of Lady Meux " was to go to the National Gallery, " if it can 
be found " (it never was finished). Her Abyssinian MSS., looted from 
that country during the Abyssinian Expedition of 1868, were bequeathed 
to the Emperor Menelek or his successor. The British Museum declined 
the bequest of the Egyptian Collection under the conditions attached 
to it, and it has since been sold by auction. 

Long obit, notices, Ti'm^s, Dec. 21st; Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 29th, 1910. 

Kit. Rev. Arthur Beresford Turner. Died Oct. 28th, i9io, 

at Chemulpho. Born at the Wardenry, Farley, Wilts, Aug. 24th, 1862. 
Son of Rev. Charles Beresford Turner, Vicar of N. Eling, Hants. 
Educated Marlborough Coll., and Keble Coll., Oxford. B.A., 1885. 
Cuddesdon Theological Coll., 1886. Deacon, 1887 ; priest, 1888, Oxford. 
Curate of Watlington, Oxon, 1887—89 ; Downton, 1889—92 ; St. Nich. 
Cath., Newcastle, 1892—96 ; S.P.G. Missionary, Korea, 1897 ; Bishop 
in Korea, 1905, until his death. During his episcopate the Korean 
Missions developed very greatly. 

Obit, notices, Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, Dec, ; Salisbury Journaly 
Nov. 5th, 1910. 



Wilts Obituary. 165 

H.S.H Prince Francis Hatzfeldt-Wildenburg, died 

suddenly, Nov. 3rd, 1910. Buried at Crottorf, Germ. Born at 
Marxheim, Hesse-Nassau, 1853. Only son of Prince Hatzfeldt- 
Wildenburg. Married, 1889, Clare Huntington, of Detroit, U.S.A. 
Since 1896 he had resided at Draycot House, which he rented of Lord 
Cowley. He was a great supporter of steeplechase racing, and in 1906 
won the Grand National. Endeared by many acts of kindness and 
consideration to the j)eople of the Draycot neighbourhood. Memorial 
sermon by the Rev. K. E. Neville, Kector, printed in Wiltshire Gazette, 
Nov. 17th. 

Obit, notices, Times, Nov. 5th ; Wiltshire Times, Nov. 12th ; Portrait 
Illust. Loud. Neivs, Nov. 17th, 1910. 

Canon Benjamin Whitefoord, D.D., died suddenly Nov 30th, 

1910, aged 61. Buried at Baverstock. Fourth son of Rev. Caleb 
Whitefoord, Rector of Whitton with Burford. Born Dec. 26th, 1848. 
Non-Col. student of Oxford 1869, became commoner of New Coll. 1871. 
B.A. 1874, M.A. 1879. Assistant Master Lucton Grammar School, 
Heref. Deacon, 1877 ; priest, 1878 (Winchester). Curate St. Maurice, 
Winchester, 1877 — 83. Principal of Salisbury Theological College, 
1883—1907; Preb. and Canon of Salisbury, 1887 ; Vicar of Potterne 
and Rural Dean 1907 until his death. Married, 1890, Marion, widow 
of Alex. Powell, of Hurdcot House, and youngest daughter of the third 
Lord Headley. His great work was done as Principal of the Theological 
College for twenty-four years. He was President of the Oxford 
University Chess Club in 1873. 

Obit, notices. Times, Dec. 1st ; Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 1st ; Salisbury, 
Journal, Dec. 3rd, 1910- 

Canon Walter Francis Short, died Dec. i9th, 1910, aged 80. 

Born July 23rd, 1831 . Son of Rev. William Short, Vicar of Chippenham 
and Prebendary of Salisbury, and Jane his wife, d. of Sir John Awdry, 
of Notton. Educated at Winchester Coll. 1844, Eellow of New Coll., 
Oxon, 1853—83; RA. and M.A., 1858. Deacon, 1856 (Oxford) ; priest, 

j 1858 (Man.). Headmaster Oswestry Grammar School, 1860—64 ; Tutor, 
New Coll., Oxon, 1864—70 ; Chaplain, Royal Military Academy, 
Woolwich, 1870—75 ; Warden, St. Paul's Coll., Stony Stratford, 1875 
-81 ; Tutor, Keble Coll., Oxon, 1881—82; Hon. Canon of Salisbury, 
1895—96 ; Rector of Donhead St. ]\Lary with Charlton, 1882 until his 
death. Rural Dean of Tislniry ])ortion of Clialke Deanery 1888 until 
his death. Wykehamical Preb. of ]>argham in Chichester Cathedral, 

I 1896. Author of " Christ's Soldiers " (sermons ])reac'he(l in St. George's 

I Garrison Chapel at Woolwich), 1874. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, Dec. 24th. 1910. 

Alfred Henry Huth, d'lvd Dec. 1 itli, 1910. Wovu is.-o. Sorond 

sun of llriiry Until, of \V\ ki'liurst, Sussex, the well-known l.iMiopliile 
and collector of tlu> famous 11 11th Library. Educated Ku.-by and P.erlin 
V'niversitv. M;irii.Ml, lS7i\ Oetavi.'i, fourth d. of Charles !•". lluth, of 



166 Wilts Obituary. 

Oakhurst, Kent. He owned Fosbury Manor and a considerable amount 
of property in that neighbourhood. He devoted much of his time to 
literature and science. He was author of : — 

" The Life and Writings of Thomas Henry Buckle," two vols., 8vo^ 
1880. 

"The Marriage of Near Kin," 8vo, 18V5 — second edition, large 8 vo, 
1887. 

" Goethe's 'Faust ' in English Verse." 

He printed the " Speculum Humanse Salvationis " for the Roxburgh 
Club, of which he was for some years a vice-president. By his will he 
left to the British Museum any fifty items from his library that the 
authorities of the museum might choose, to be known as " The Huth 
Bequest." The MSS. and books chosen under this clause form an 
exceedingly valuable addition to the Museum library. An article on 
the library appeared in The Times, January 17th, 1911. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, Oct. 29th, 1910. 



Canon Kobert Sparke Hutchings, died Nov. 6th, 1910, 

aged 90. Buried at Alderbary, Born at Penang, Dec. 18th, 1819, son 
of Robert Hutchings, chaplain in East India Company's service and 
Rector of Dittisham, Devon. Educated, King's Coll., London ; Fell 
Exhibitioner of Ch. Ch., Oxon. B.A., 1843 ; M.A., 1847. Deacon, 
1845 ; priest, 1846 (Exeter). Curate of Kingsteignton (Dev.), 1845—47 ; 
Perpetual Curate of MonktonWy Id (Dorset), 1850—65 ; Vicar of Pitton 
with Farley, 1865—74 ; Vicar of Alderbury, 1865 until his death. Preb. 
and Canon of Salisbury Cathedral, 1876. Proctor in Convocation, 
1886—1906. Married Frances, d. of Charles Philip Hodson, of Stainsby 
Hall, near Ripon. Two sons and two daughters survive him. Well 
known in the Diocese of Salisbury. Alderbury Church was re-built 
during his incumbency. He built the reading room and gave an ex- 
tension of the churchyard. He took a prominent part in all diocesan 
matters, especially in all matters connected with temperance and the 
support of Church schools- He was also active in the support of the 
Clergy Pensions Institution and of the Salisbury Infirmary. His hobby 
was astronomy, and he possessed a powerful telescope in the vicarage 
grounds. He was the author of : — 

" Lay Help in Church Work." Salisbury, 1870. 8vo pamphlet. 

" The Final Court of Appeal, its Legitimate and Proper Function. 
A paper read Nov. 8th, 1899." Salisbury and London. 8vo 
pamphlet. 

" The Testimony of Science to the Truth and Accuracy of the Bible i 
Account of Creation. A Sermon preached in Salisbury Cathedral ' 
Sept. 10th, 1905." Salisbury. 8vo pamphlet. 

And other sermons. 

Obit, notices. Guardian, Nov. 11th and 18th; Wilts County Mirror,^ 
Nov. 11th; Salisbury Journal, Nov. 12th; Salisbury Diocesan Gazette J 
Dec, 1910. 



Wilts Ohituary, 167 

Henry Augfustus Brudenell Bruce, Sth Marquis of 

Ailesbury, Earl Bruce and Yiscount Savernake in. the peerage of 
the United Kingdom, Earl of Ailesbury and Baron Bruce of Tottenham 
in that of Great Britain, and Earl of Cardigan and Baron Brudenell in 
that of England, died Feb. 10th, 1911, aged 68. Buried at St. Katherine's, 
Savernake. Born April lltli, 1842, Third s. of third Marquis. For- 
merly Captain in 9th Regt., and Lt. Col, 3rd Battalion of Wiltshire 
Regiment- As Lord Henry Bruce he was M.P. for Chippenham 
Division as a Conservative 1886—92. He succeeded his nephew, the 
fourth Marquis in 1894. Married, 1870, Georgiana Sophia Maria, d. of 
G. H. Pinkney, of Tawstock Court, Devon, who died 1902. He leaves 
one son, the Earl of Cardigan, D.S.O., who succeeds to the title, born 
1873, and two daughters, Lady Ernestine Hunt, wife of Harry Brady 
Hunt, of Ballylean, Kildysart, Co. Clare, and Lady Marjory Binney, 
wife of James Binney, of Pampisford, Cambs. The late Marquis 
succeeded to a greatly-incumbered estate and devoted himself to its 
improvement for the rest of his life. He planted a million trees on the 
property during the last seventeen years, including avenues of copper 
beech and horse chestnut in the Forest, and 30,000 trees on Martin sell. 
He had the welfare of the people on the estate always at heart, and 
was esteemed as a kind and considerate landlord, but he took but little 
part in matters outside the estate. 

Obit, notices, Times, Feb. 11th; Wiltshire Gazette, ^Ad^xdi 16th, 1911. 

Hon. Percy Scawen Wyndham, died March i3th, I9ii. 

Born 1835. Son of first Lord Leconfield. Educated at Eton, after- 
wards travelled in Italy with tutor. Joined Coldstream Guards, 1853, 
and sailed with them to A^arna, but was invalided home before com- 
mencement of Crimean War. Left the Army and joined the Volunteers 
when first raised, retiring with rank of captain. Conservative M.P. for 
West Cumberland, 1860 — 85. Chairman of Quarter Sessions in Cum- 
berland, J.P. and D.L. for Cumberland, Sussex, and Wilts. Lived at 
Cockermouth Castle 1860 — 69, where his five children were born. 
Removed to Isel Hall, 1869—1877 ; Wilbury House, Wilts, 1874—1885. 
Began to build his own house, " Clouds," East Knoyle, 1880. This was 
burnt down 1889 and rebuilt by 1893. Here he lived till his death. 
High Sheriff of Wilts, 1896. Chairman of Quarter Sessions, Yice- 
Chairman of County Council, and an active county magistrate. " In 
all these capacities," says The Times, " he was looked upon as an ideal 
public servant. From very early days he was a wise amateur of the 
arts, especially of painting. Philip Webb, the architect of Clouds — 
Watts — Sargent— Burne Jones and Leighton and Val Prinsep were all 
intimate friends of his and Mrs. Wyndham's. He was remarkably 
cultivated and well read, spoke and read fluently and forcibly with a 
kindly vein of humour, was a thorough sportsman in the best sense of 
the word (he was master of the Tedworth Hounds from 1881 to 18S5), 
and had a sense of his rcs])onsil)ilities and duties to his deiiendants 
wliicli \\as as lmiul)lc as it was proud. For his ri'ady syiui)athy, his 



168 Wilts Obituary, 

wise and quiet helpfulness and his courteous and upright life he was 
loved and respected not only by his friends but by everyone who knew 
him." He married, 1860, Madeline, d. of Major-Gen. Sir Guy Campbell 
and his wife Pamela, d. of Lord Edward Fitzgerald. He leaves two 
sons — George, Chief Secretary for Ireland, 1900 — 1905, Col. Guy, of 
the 16th Lancers, now Military Attache at St. Petersburg — and three 
daughters— Lady Elcho, Mrs. Charles Adeane, and Lady Tennant. 

Long obit, notices, Times, March 14th ; Wiltshire Gazette, March 16th, 
1911. Portrait, Sphere, March 18th, 1911. 

HeV. Felix John Buckley, died March 20th, 1911, aged 76. 
Buried at Bournemouth. Educated Eton, 1845. Merton Coll., Oxon. 
B.A., 1858; M.A., 1861. Deacon, 1858 ; priest, 1859 (Exeter). Curate 
of Buckland Monachorum, Dev., 1858 — 61 ; Rownhams, Hants, 1861—63; 
Nunton, Wilts, 1863—67. Rector of Stanton St. Quintin, 1867—70. 
Curate of Bemerton, 1870—71. Vicar of Mountfield, Sussex, 1871—80. 
Rector of Stanton St. Quintin, 1880 until he resigned, 1905. Rural 
Dean of Malmesbury, 1883. Hon. Canon of Bristol, 1887, 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, March 30th, 1911. 

Mary Anne Ewart, of Coneyhurst,Ewhurst,Surrey,diedFeb.l9th, 
1911, aged 80. Eldest d. of the late William Ewart, M.P., of Broadleas, 
Devizes. " The name of the late Miss Mary Anne Ewart will long be 
remembered in connection with the higher education of women " (Times). 
She took an active interest forty years ago in Bedford College and 
contributed to the building fund, also in the N. London Collegiate and 
Camden Schools, where her contributions enabled a " Ewart" wing to 
be built. In later years she was greatly interested in ISTewnham College, 
Cambridge, and Somerville Coll., Oxford. To the former she left by 
her will £20,000 to found scholarships and tutorships ; and to the latter 
£10,000 for like purposes. She was also a member of the Council of 
the Central Bureau for the Employment of W^omen. In all causes 
connected with women's progress she took an active part. 

Obit, notices, Queen, Feb. 25th ; Times, March 29th ; Wiltshire 
Gazette, March 30th, 1911. 

Capt. Harry Alworth Pellowes Merewether, died 

March 28th, 1911. Eldest son of Henry Alworth Merewether, Q.C., of 
Bowden Hill. He served in the 66th (Berkshire) Regiment. Married 
Mary, d. of Commodore Henry Caldwell, CB. Had lived at Moor 
Hill, Shedfield, Hants, for the last twenty-five years. 

Canon Robert Rowley Watts, died Jan. loth, i9ii, aged si. 

Buried at Stourpaine, Dorset. Born Nov. 10th, 1829. Educated 
Charterhouse, 1844, Univ. Coll., Oxon. B.A., 1852 ; M.A., 1858. 
Deacon, 1854 ; priest, 1855 (Salisbury). Curate of Maddington, 1854 
— 56. Assistant Master, Charterhouse, 1856—62. Curate of Charlton 
Marshall (Dors.), 1862—67. Vicar of Stourpaine (Dors.), 1867—1902. 
Rector of Steepleton Iwerne, 1877—1902. Prebendary and Canon of 



Wilts Ohif/m.ry. 169 

Salisbury, 1887. Sub-Dean of Salisbury Cathedral, 1902 until liis 
death. Since 1902 he had lived at Bemerton. 

Obit, notices, Salishury Journal^ Jan. 14th and 21st, 1911. 

£lias Pitt Squarey, Died Feb. 25th, 1911, aged 87. Buried at 
Downton. Born at Salisbury, Oct. 20th, 1823. Began farming on his 
own account at 18, taking a farm of 500 acres at Teffont. Removed to a 
farm of 1800 acres at Odstock in 1848. In 1873 he gave up farming, and 
having purchased the Moot, Downton, resided there until his death. In 
1852 he joined Mr. James Rawlence, land agent and surveyor, as partner, 
and the firm of Rawlence k Squarey was founded, and soon became 
agents for a number of large estates about Salisbury and elsewhere. 
He was a great authority on all matters connected with farming and 
landed estate management, was frequently called on to give evidence 
before Royal Commissions, acted as valuer for the War Office in the 
purchase of Salisbury Plain, and was largely instrumental in founding 
the Surveyors' Institution, and the Land Enfranchisement Company. 
A Liberal until 1886 he then became a Liberal Unionist. He married, 
1854, Lavinia Mary, d. of Robert Tucker, of Ashburton, Devon, who 
survives him. He had one son, Newall Squarey, a member of the firm, 
aud three daughters. He contributed many papers to the Journals of 
the Surveyors' Institution and the Royal Agricultural and Bath and 
West of England Associations. 

Obit, notices. Times, Feb. 28th ; Wilts County Mirror, Feb. 28th ; 
Salisbury Journal, March 4th, 1911. 

Kev. William Paul Lawrence, died May 6th, i9ii, aged 83. 

Buried at Penknap Baptist Burial Ground, Westbury. Pastor of 
Baptist Church at Gillingham (Dorset), 1869 ; and of the West End 
Baptist Church at Westbury, 1876 — 1904, when he resigned, living 
afterwards at Westbury Leigh. He had been President of the Wilts 
and East Somerset Baptist Association, and was prominent as a Liberal 
and Passive Resister. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, May 13th, 1911. 

Stephen Furness, died June 19th, 1911. Buried at Berwick St. 
James. Son of John Furness, of West Hartlepool. Associated with 
the late Alderman Thomas Furness in business there. Married 
daughter of Nixon T. Sharper, of W. Hartlepool. Resided in London 
for many years. Settled at Berwick St. James ]\Ianor House, and 
farmed 1,800 acres. A member of the Wilton District Council, and wrll 
known as an agriculturist. 

()l)it. notice, Wilts Count II Mirror, June 23nl, 1J)1 !. 

Mervyn Herbert Nevil Story Maskelyne. P.R.S., 

di.'.l Mayi^'Mh, 1 1) I 1 , a-cd S7. r>nric(l at I'lirlon. llciii Srpl. :)rd, IS:.>;5. 
Eldest son of .\ntlion> .M( r\\ii Story Maskelyne, F.H.S., (and granilson 
of Nevil Maskelyne. Astronomer Poyal, F.R.S.y Wadham Coll., Oxon. 
F).A. isi:.. Trofessor of M ineralo-v at Oxford, ls:.(J— a"). "His tenure 



170 Wilts Obihtary. 

of the chair of mineralogy," says the Times, " was a conspicuous success, 
and during his term of office he not only practically introduced the 
study of experimental chemistry into the University, but took an 
active part in the struggle waged for the establishment of a scientific 
museum." " But before becoming professor at Oxford he had entered 
the British Museum . . . had specialized in mineralogy and became 
one of the leading authorities in England on that class of subjects. He 
was promoted to be Keeper of the Minerals [1857 — 1880] ... A 
noble testimony to his labours as the first Keeper of Minerals is the 
magnificent collection which adorns the Natural History Museum ; 
assisted only by a small staff" he succeeded in raising that collection to 
a position of absolute preeminence both as regards excellence of material 
and tasteful arrangement . , . His singular alertness of mind always led 
him to attack new problems with particular zest . . . Maskelyne was 
the first in England to recognize the importance of crystalline symmetry 
. . . Here, as in everything, he showed himself quick to assimilate the 
newest views and to be in the first line of advance ... In him we 
have lost one of the scientific pioneers of the 19th century.'' Nature 
says, with reference to his scientific papers, "They range over a wide field, 
and are characterised by a charm of literary style which is well known 
to all who received letters from him. His activities date from so early 
a period that it is difficult now to ascertain what personal part he 
played in some of the scientific discoveries of the middle of the nine- 
teenth century." " Maskelyne's interests outside science were also 
very wide, and he was the owner of one of the best and most carefully 
selected private collections of antique engraved gems." He succeeded 
to the Basset Down estates in 1879, became Liberal Member forCricklade 
1880 and for North Wilts 1884. He sat as a Liberal Unionist 1886—92, 
and remained to the end of his life an active supporter of the 
Unionist cause. As a member of the County Council from its 
creation until he was over 80, he was for long chairman of the Agri- 
cultural Committee, and took a conspicuous part, especially, in the 
measures for the improvement of dairying in Wiltshire. 

He was a Fellow of the Royal Society, Hon. D.Sc. of Oxford [1903], 
Hon. Fellow of Wadham College, Wollaston Gold Medallist of the 
Geological Society [1893], and corresponding member of many foreign 
mineralogical and geological societies. He was J.P. for Gloucestershire, 
Brecknock, and Wilts, and in his own neighbourhood was best known 
not as a great scientist but as an able and earnest worker for the 
good of the County of Wilts in many ways. He was President 
of the Wilts Archaeological Society, 1883 — 86, and was always a 
generous supporter of the Society's work. To the very end of his life 
he retained his keen grasp of the political and scientific interests of 
the day. He married, 1858, Theresa, d. of J. Dillwyn Llewellyn, 
F.R.S., who with his three daughters survives him. 

Long obituary notice in Times, May 22nd, 1911, copied in Wiltshire 
Gazette, and Wiltshire Times, with portrait, May 27th. A notice of 
three columns, by " H.A.M.," in Nature, June 1st, 1911, pp. 452, 453, 
another in Wadharn, College Magazine. 



WiUs OUtuary. 171 

Bibliographical List of his Works. ^ 

1852. ON THE NATURE OF THE EQUIVALENCE OF THE CHEMICAL 

ELEMENTS. Abstracted from the Proc. of the Ashinolean 
Soc. of May 24th, 1852. Bvo, pp. 4. 

1853. KEPOKT MADE TO J. 11. MARKLAND, ESQ., D.C.L., F.K.S., THE 

PRESIDEJNT, AND TO THE GOVEllNOllS OF THE GENERAL 
HOSPITAL AT BATH ON THE BEST MEANS OF CONVEY- 
ANCE OF THE BATH MINERAL WATER FOR A DISTANCE 
OF 1200 YARDS." Oxford, 1853. Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 24. 
Two diagrams. 
]853. ON THE OXIDATION OF CHINESE AVAX. Chein. Soc. Journ., 

v., 1853, pp. 24—26, 
1856. INVESTIGATION OF THE VEGETABLE TALLOW FROM A 
CHINESE PLANT {Stillingia sebifera). Chem. Soc. Journ.y 
VII., 1856, pp, 1—13 ; Erdmann's Journ. Praht. Chem.-, 
LXV., 1855, pp. 287—296. 
1858—62. ON THE INSIGHT HITHERTO OBTAINED INTO THE 
NATURE OF THE CRYSTAL MOLECULE BY THE INSTRU- 
MENTALITY OF LIGHT. Boyal Inst, Proc, III., 1858—62, 
pp. 95—106. 
1858—62. ON DIAMONDS. Royal Inst. Proc, III., 1858—62, pp. 

229—233. 
1860. REPOItT ON THE PRESENT STATE OF OUR KNOWLEDGE 
•REGARDING THE PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGE. Photogr. Soc. 
Journ., VI., 1860, pp. 308—312; Brit. Assoc Peport, 
1859, pp. 103—110. 

1862. ON AEROLITES. Brit. Assoc Bej)ort, 1 862 (pt. 2), pp. 188—9 1 • 
1861—64. MINEKALOGICAL NOTES, (1) ON CONNELITE ; (2) ON A 

CRYSTAL OF COLUMBITE FROM MONTE VIDEO; (3) 
AEROLITES ; (4) THE FALL OF BUTSURA, 12tII MAY, 
1861; Philosophical Mag., xxv., 1863, pp. 39, 58 ; (5) 
PEirni ; (G) parnallee; (7) dukala ; (8) nullore; 
(9) dhenagur; (10) mhow ; (11) moPvADABAD ; (12) 
paulograi) ; (13) plesskowitz aekolitk ; (14) 

AVihoug" Phil. Mag., xxv., 437—453; (15); KUSIALI, 
KUMA0N;(1()) KAKE, OUDE ; Vhil . Mag., xxviii., 1864, 
])p. 148—150 

1863, XO'I'K'ES Ol' AKi;()I,I TKS : KlIli;A(;rini AM) MANKiiAUM; 

i'kll. Mag., x.wi., 1863, pp. 134—139. 



' For this list ilir I'Mitcr is chictlx- iiulchtcd to tlio kindness of Mrs. Story 
Maskelyiie. 



172 Wilts OUtuary. 

1864. NEW BRITISH MINERAL ; Phil Mag., xxvii., 1864, p, 316. 

1865. ON NEW CORNISH MINERALS OF THE BROCHANTITE GROUP ; 

Royal Soc. Proc, xiv., 1865, pp. 86—89, 392—400 ; PhiL 
Mag., xxix., 1865, pp, 473—476. 
1865. ON CRYSTALS OF MELACONITE, AND ON TENORITE ; Prit. 
Assoc. Report, xxxv., 1865, pp. 33—34. 

1865. THE COLLECTIONS AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM. London. 

1865. Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 69. Published anonymously, 
printed by Spottiswoode. [Apparently a reprint, with 
additions, of two articles from the Times of Oct. 6th and 
7th, 1863.] Another edition? 1867. 

1866. WARINGTONITE ; Phil. Mag., 1866, Ser, IV., vol. xxix., pp. 

475—476. 
1866. UEBER DIE KRYSTALLGESTALT DES KUPFEROXYDES. &U 

Petersh. Verhand. GesselVs Mi7ieralog. L, 1866, Ser. II., 

Bd. I., pp. 147—150. 
1869. ON THE MURRHINE VASES OF THE ANCIENTS. Proc. Soc. 

Ant. Lond., Jan. 28th, 1869, 2nd Ser., IV., p. 218. 
1869. PRELIMINARY NOTICE ON THE MINERAL CONSTITUENTS OF 

THE BRKITENBACH METEORITE. Royal Soc. Proc, xii., 

1869, pp. 370—372. 

1869. ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CANUBA WAX. Chem. 

Soc- Jour7i., vii., 1869, pp. 87—89. 

1870. THE MARLBOROUGH GEMS. BEING A COLLECTION OF 

WORKS IN CAMEO AND INTAGLIO FORMED BY GEORGE, 
THIRD DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH. CATALOGUED WITH 
DESCRIPTIONS, AND AN INTRODUCTION BY M. H. NEVIL 
STORY MASKELYNE, M.A., F.R.S., PROFESSOR OF MINER- 
ALOGY, OXFORD, KEEPER OF THE MINERAL DEPARTMENT, 
BRITISH MUSEUM. PRINTED FOR PRIVATE DISTRIBU- 
TION. 1870. 4to, pp. xl. + 118. 

1870—71. ON THE MINERAL CONSTITUENTS OF METEORITES 
Read before the Eoyal Society, January 13th, 1870, 
Philosophical Transactions, c\x., 1870, pp. 189 — 214. 4to 
Two plates. Read Jan. 26th, 1871. lb., clxi., 1871, pp, 
359—367 ; Royal Soc. Proc, xviii., 1870, pp. 146-57 
xix., 1871, pp. 266—268. 

1871. ON ANDREWSITE. Brit. Assoc Report, xli., 1871, pp. 74—75 

Chem. News, xxiv., 1871, pp. 99. 
1871—74. MINERALOGICAL NOTES ; Chem. Soc Journ., 1871, Ser. 
II., vol. ix., pp. 1—13 ; 1872, vol. x., 1049—1057 ; 1874, 
vol. xii., 101—103. 



Wilts Obituary. 173 

1871. LOCALITrES OF DIOPTASE. Brit. Assoc. Report, xli., 1871, 

pp. 74—75 ; Ghem. News, xxiv., 1871, p. 99. 

1872. ON METEORIC STONES. Chem. Neivs, 1872, xxvi., pp. 61—62. 

1873. Royal Instituton Proc, iv., 1872, 

pp. 513 — 517 ; Pharmac. Journ., 
iii., 1873, pp. 124—126. 

1874. SOME NOTES BEARING ON THE SYMMETRICAL DISTRIBU- 

TIONS OF PHYSICAL CHARACTERS IN CRYSTALS. [Dated 
from the Royal Institution, June 4th, 1874.] Pamphlet, 
cr. 8vo, pp. 20. 

1874. ON THE CHARACTER OF THE DIAMANTIFEROUS ROCK OF S. 

AFRICA. By Prof. N. Story Maskelyne, F.R.S., Keeper, and 
Dr. W. Flight, Assistant, of the Mineral Department, 
British Museum. Quarterly Journal of the Geoloc/ical 
Society, Nov., 1874, xxx., pp. 406—416. 

1875. NOTES OF SOME LECTURES GIVEN AT THE APARTMENTS OF 

THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY AT CHRISTMAS, 1874. By Nevil 
Story Maskelyne, M.A., F.R.S. Reprinted from the 
Chemical Neivs. London, 1875. Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 47. 
1875. INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING OBSERVATIONS ON, AND 
COLLECTING MINERALOGICAL SPECIMENS. Pages 77—82 
of the Manual of the Natural History, Geology, and 
Physics of Greenland and Neighbouring Regions ; pre- 
pared for the Arctic Expedition of 1875 . . , Edited 
by Prof. T. Rupert Jones. London. 1875. 

1875. SOME LECTURE NOTES ON METEORITES. Nature, 1875, xii., 

pp. 485, 504, 520. 
1875. ON ANDREWSITE AND CHALCOSIDERITE. Chem. Soc. Journ.^ 

1875, Ser. II., pp. 586—591 ; Chem. Neivs, 1875, xxxi., 
513—514. 

1875. ON THE CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC CHARACTERS OF NITRO- 

SOTERPEXE. Chem. Soc. Journ., 1875, Ser. II., vol. xiii., 
pp. 518—519. 

1876. THE PITTED SURFACE OF :\IETEORITES. Phil. Mag., 1876, 

Ser. v., vol. li., pp. 126—181. 
1876. THE ROWTOX SIDEUFTE. Nature, 1876, vol. xv., p. 272. 

1876. CRYSTALLOGRAPHY — MINERALOCJY. HANDBOOK TO THE 

SPECIAL LOAN COLLECTION OF S( lENTIFIC APP.\KATUS, 

1876, pp. 304—820. 

1877. INDIUM IN r.RITISH I'.LKNI>KS. xV<r/?ov, 1877, vol. xvii., ji. 5. 
1877. STONEllKNCK ; rilK rKTI!()I.(MiN- OK IIS STONKS. II'/V/.s- 

yln-/i. iVar/., xvii., pp. 147— 160. One i.latf. [1S77.] This 
paper was also i)rinted as : — 



174 Wilts Obituary. 

"THE PETROLOGY OF THE STONEHENGE STONES. A 
paper read at the Salisbury Meeting of the Wiltshire 
Archaeological and Natural History Society, August 24th, 
1876. Privately printed. Salisbury." Pamphlet, cr. 8vo, 
pp.5. 
1877. NOTE ON THE OPTICAL CHARACTERS OF LUDLAMITE. 

Phil. Mag., 1877, Ser. V., vol. iii., pp. 135—137, 525. 
1877. TROY, .MYCEN^, AND DR. SCHLIEMANN. Article in 
Wiltshire Times, April 5th, 1877. 

1877. ON THE DISCRIMINATON OF CRYSTALS BY THEIR OPTICAL 

CHARACTERS. Chem. News, 1877, vol. xxxv., pp. 152, 154. 

1878. PETROLOGY OF THE ISLAND OF RODRIGUEZ. Phil. Trans., 

1878, clxviii., pp. 296—301. 

1878. A NEW MINERAL. Nature, 1878, xviii., p. 426. 

1879. ENSTATITE ROCK FROM SOUTH AFRICA. Phil. Mag., vii., 

pp. 135—136. 

1880. ARTIFICIAL DIAMONDS. Journ. Soc. Arts, xxviii., No. 1429, 
p. 289. [From the Times. 1880.] 

1880. THE ASSERTED ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION OF THE DIAMOND. 

Nature, 1880, xxi., pp. 203, 204, 260—261. 
1880. OBITUARY NOTICE OF PROFESSOR W. H. MILLER. Nature, 

1880, xxii., pp. 247—9. 

1882. ON AN ARTIFICIAL DIOPSIDE ROCK FORMED IN A BESSEMER 

CONVERTER. Proc. Cryst. Soc, 1882, pt. ii., pp. 59—60. 

1883. ADDRESS AS PRESIDENT OF THE WILTS ARCH. AND NAT. 

HIST. SOC, 1883. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxi., pp. 274—286. 
1886. BARBURY CASTLE. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxiii., pp. 180—194. 
Two plates. Eead Aug. 10th, 1886. 

[This paper was reprinted from the report in the North 
Wilts Herald in pamphlet form, cr. 8vo, pp. 16. " Wiltshire 
Archeeological and Natural History Society. Annual 
Meeting held at Swindon, on August 13th, 1866. ' Barbury 
Castle,' an address by the President, N. Story Maskelyne, 
Esq., M.P."] 

1891. THE KOH-I-NUR. Nature, xliv., 555—9 ; xlv., pp. 5—7. 
[By N. S. Maskelyne and Dr. W. Flight.] 

1894. GREEK ART. "Lecture by Mr. N. Story Maskelyne, reprinted 

from the North Wilts Herald, Friday, March 16th, 1894." 
4to, pp. 2. 

1895. CRYSTALLOGRAPHY. A TREATISE ON THE MORPHOLOGY OF 

CRYSTALS. N. Story Maskelyne, M.A., F.R.S., Professor 
of Mineralogy, Oxford, Honorary Fellow of Wadham 
College. Oxford. Clarendon Press, 1895, cr. 8vo, cloth, 
pp. xii. + 521. Price 12s. Qd. 



Wilts Obituary. 175 

1896 MINERAL VEINS AND THEIK HLSTOKY. Read Oct. iVtli, 
1895. G.W.R. Mechanics' Institution, New Swindon, 
Junior Engineering Society. Pamphlet, 8vo, pp. 18 + 1 p. 
of diagrams. Dated November, 1896. 

N.D. THE METALS AND MINERALS OE THE lUBLE Pamphlet, 
Siin. X 6|in., pp. 15. 

1898. THE PLACE NAME CRICKLADE. A SUGGESTION. Wilts 
Arch. Mag., xxx., pp. 95—99. [1898.] 

1907. A GLOSSARY OF TERMS RELATING TO THE MAKING OF 
BUTTER, WITH EXPLANATIONS OF SUCH TERMS AND 
SIMPLE DISCUSSIONS ON PRINCIPLES INVOLVED IN 
THEM. FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS IN THE WILTS 
ITINERANT BUTTER SCHOOL, Trowbridge: R. J. Massey 
Sl Co., 1907. lOiin. X 7iin., pp. 2 + 130. 

John Beddoe, M.D., F.R.C.P., LL.D., P.R.S., died July l9th, 
1911, aged 84. Buried at Edinburgh. Born at Bewdley, Sept. 21st, 
1826. Educated at Bridgnorth Grammar School, 1845, entered office of 
a solicitor at Ledbury, but subsequently turned his attention to 
medicine, became a student at University College, London, M.B, and 
M.D. (1853) of Edinburgh. In 1854 he went out to the Crimea to 
work in the base hospitals, and subsequently travelled much, until he 
settled down at Clifton in 1857 to build up a practice. He married, 
1858, Agnes Montgomerie, d. of Alex. Christieson, minister of Foulden, 
Berwickshire, who survives him, with one daughter, married to 
Capt. H. H. D. Tothill, R.N. He became one of the leading physicians 
in Bristol, until in 1891 he retired to the Chantry, Bradford-on-Avon. 
Here he served on the Urban District Council and Board of Guardians 
and was for some years a member of the County Council. His work 
in Bristol was greatly valued and in 1907 his portrait by Miss E. 
Baldwin Warn was publicly presented to the City Art Gallery. But 
it was as an anthropologist that he was really famous, and it was with 
this subject that his most valuable work was concerned. He was 
President of the Anthropological Institute, 1889 — 90, and as lately as 
1905 delivered the Huxley lecture of the Institute in London. He 
delivered the Rhind Lectures at Edinburgh in 1890. He was also a 
corresponding member of a number of European Anthropological 
Societies in Paris, Berlin, Sweden, Rome, etc. He was Hon. Professor 
of Anthro])ology at University College, Bristol, and received the decora- 
tion of Officier de 1' Instruction Publique of the 1st Class from the 
French Government. He never lost an opportunity of noting tlie 
sliai)e of the head and the colour of the eyes and hair of everybody 
lu; met. In the collection of these particulars and in the reduction of 
an inlinite number of such observations in connection with specified 
localities, to a basis on which could be securely founded a theory on 
the inllueni'e and ])revalence of diU'creiit races in \ariuus i)arts of 



176 Wilts OUUiary. 

Great Britain, his chief interest lay, and his most enduring work was 
done. All future students of the subject will find a mass of material 
ready to their hand, which only a long life and unwearied perseverance 
and sound judgment could have amassed or digested. In the last three 
years he had filled the office of President of the Wiltshire Archaeological 
and Natural History Society, and only a fortnight before his death had 
been present at the Society's meeting at Malmesbury and had taken 
part in the excursions of the meeting. In the subjects which he had 
made his own his stores of knowledge were always at the service of the 
Society. In the long list of Presidents few, if any, have been more 
distinguished, whilst to those who were privileged to know him per- 
sonally, the gentleness and unassuming modesty of his demeanour, 
together with his unfailing courtesy and kindness to all who came in 
contact with him, endeared him in no ordinary measure. A list of his 
writings is given below. 

Obit, notices, Times, July 20th ; Wiltshire Gazette, July 20th ; Wilt- 
shire Times, with portrait, July 22nd, 1911. 

List of his writings.^ 

A CONTRIBUTION TO SCOTTISH ETHNOLOGY. 1853. 

ANCIENT AND MODERN ETHNOGRAPHY OF SCOTLAND. 1854. 

REPORT ON RENKIOI HOSPITAL, DARDANELLES, APPENDIX 2. 1856, 

ETHNOLOGICAL NOTES MADE AT RENKIOI. 1856. 

PHYSICAL CHARACTERS OF ANCIENT AND MODERN GERMANS. 

Trans. Brit, Assoc, 1857. 
PHYSICAL CHARACTERS OF NATIVES OF PARTS OF ITALY AND THE 

AUSTRIAN DOMINIONS, ETC. Ethnological Trans., Vol. 1. N.S., 

1861. 
SUR LA COULEUR DES YEUX ET DES CHEVEUX DES IRLANDAIS. 

Bulletins la le Societe Anthropologique, 1861. 
ON THE SUPPOSED INCREASING PREVALENCE OF DARK HAIR IN 

ENGLAND. Anthropological Review, I., 1863. 
TESTIMONY OF LOCAL PHENOMENA IN THE WEST OF ENGLAND TO 

PERMANENCE OF ANTHROPOLOLOGICAL TYPES. Memoirs 

Anthropological Society, Vol. II. 1865. 
SUR LES TETES DES FINNOIS ET DES SUEDOIS. Bulletins Soc d' 

Anthropologic, VI. 1865. 
HEADFORMS OF THE WEST OF ENGLAND. Memoirs Anthrop. Soc.r 

III. 1865. 
ON THE STATURE AND BULK OF MAN IN THE BRITISH ISLES. Ihid 

III, 1867. 

[This was reprinted and issued as a separate volume, under 

the same title. London : Asher k Co., Bedford Street, Covent 

Garden, 1870. 8vo., pp. 1 + 191-] 

^ For this list the Editor is chiefly indebted to the kindness of Mrs. 
Tothill. 



Wilts Ohituary. 177 

PIIY.SrCAL ClIARACTERLSTICS OF INHABITANTS OF BRETAGNP:. 76iVi., 

III. 1867. 
IIEADFORM OF DANES. Ibid., III. 1867. 
THE KELTS OF IRELAND. Journal of Anthropology. 1870. 
ANTHROrOLOClY OF LANCASHIRE. Iljid. 1871. 
NOTES ON THE WALLONS. Journcd of Anthropology, \o\.ll. 1872- 
ANTHROROLOOY OF YORKSHIRE. Tran^- Brit. A.^soc. 18713. 
ON MODERN ETHNOLOGICAL MIGRATIONS. Journal of Anthropological 

Institute, IV. 1875. 
€RANIA FROM ST. WERRUIfGH's, BRISTOL. 1878. 
ABORIGINES OF CENT HAL QUEENSLAND. Journal of Anthrop. 

Inst., Yll. 1878. 
THE BULGARIANS. //;w/., YIII. 1879. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL COLOR PHENOMENA, BELGIUM, ETC. Ibid., 

X. 1881. 
ENGLISH SURNAMES FROM THE ETHNOLOGICAL POINT OF VIEW. 

Ibid., XII. 1882. 
SKULLS IN VAULT UNDER MICHELDEAN CHURCH. IVans. Bristol 

and Gloucestershire Arch. Soc, VI. 1882. 
SKELETONS FOUND AT GLOUCESTER BY JOHN ]>,ELLOWS (SILURIAN?). 

Ibid., VI. 1882. 
ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE. Ibid., VI. 1882. 
ANITIKOPOLOGY OF LANCASHIRE. Brit. Assoc. 1 
STATUTE OF INHABITANTS OF HUNGARY. Journal of Anthrop. Inst. 

1882. 
SUR LA COULKUll DES YEUX ET DES CHEVEUX DANS LA FRANCE DU 

NOlll) KT DU CENTRE. Btdletins Societe d' Anthropologic^, 3rcl 

Series, V. 1882. 
(OULEUR DES CHEVEUX ET DES YEUX EN SUISSE. Soc. des Sciences 

Nat. Neuchatel, CXIII. 1883. 
'J'lIE RACES OF BRITAIN, A CONTRIBUTION TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY 

OF WESTERN EUROPE. Bristol : J. W. Arrowsmitli, Quay Street. 

J.ondon : Triibner tt Co., Ludgate Hill. 1885. Otjin. X6^in. Cloth, 

])]). viii. + 271 -f 4 ])p. of appendices unnumbered. A number of 

maps, diagrams, and ])lates of typical physiognomies. [This work, 

the author says in his preface, is founded on au uni)ublished essay 

with which ill 1868 he won the great ])rize of the Welsh Xatioiial 

KistcMhlto.l.] 
rilVslCAL AN rilKol'Ol.oCV ol- TllK 1S1,K OK ^L\N. Mnnx Note 

Book. 1887. 
STATl'KE OF TllK ()I,lil':i; IIACI'.S oj" KNCLAXD. Jourmd of A nth, oi*. 

Insf. 1SS7. 
WOODCUI'S, Iv'oTllKiM.KV. Kfi ., IHMAN KKMAINS. ////./., \i.\. IS'JO. 

<iL. X.X.WII. — NO. (\\. N 



178 Wilts Obituary. 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE NATURAL COLOR OF THE SKIN IN ORIENTAL 

RACES. Ibid., XIX. 1890. 
ANNIVERSARY PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS. Ibid., XIX. 1890. 
DO. DO. Ibid., XX. 1891. 

ANTHROPOLOGICAL HISTORY OF EUROPE. RHIND LECTURES FOR 

1891. Scottish Revieiv, 1892—3. 
NORTHERN SETTLEMENTS OF THE WEST SAXONS. Journal of 

Anthrop, Inst. 1893. 

l' historie de l'indice cephalique dans les iles britanniques. 

V Anthropologie, IV. 1894. 
ANTHROPOMETRY IN INDIA. Science Progress. 1895. 
SELECTION IN MAN (series of papers). Ibid. 1896. 
PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE ISLE OF MAN (A. W. Moore and 

J. Beddoe). Ibid. 1897. 
COMPLEXIONAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN IRISH WITH INDIGENOUS 

AND EXOTIC SUimAMES RESPECTIVELY. Ibid. 1897. 
MEDIEVAL POPULATION OF BRISTOL. Ibid. 1899. 
A BUSHMAN SKULL. Man, LVIII. 1901. 
PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF SWEDEN. 1901. 
IIARLYN BAY SKELETONS. Trans. Royal Institution of Cornwall. 

1901. 
EVALUATIONT ET SIGNIFICATION DE LA CAPACITE CRANIENNE. 

LAnthropologie . 
CERTAIN HUMAN BONES FROM THE CATTEDOWN CAVE DISCOVERED 

BY MR. BURNARD. Trans. Plymouth Institution. 1903—4. 
CRANIUM AND OTHER BONES, KINGSTON BAGPUZE, NEAR 

ABINGDON. Bristol Nat. Hist. Soc Proc. 1908-4. 
SOMATOLOGY OF 800 BOYS (rOYAL NAVY). Jour. Anthrop. Inst-, 

xxxiv. 1904. 
METHOD OF ESTIMATING SKULL CAPACITY FROM PERIPDERAL 

MEASUREMENTS. Ibid. 1904. 
REPORT ON TWO SKULLS FROM GREAT DEPTHS AT BRISTOL DOCK 

GATES. Bristol Nat. Hist. Soc. Proc 1904—5. 
NOTES ON CRANIA FROM THE CARMELITE FRIARY. Bristol and 

Gloucestershire Arch. Soc. 1905. 
SERIES OF CARMELITE SKULLS FJiOM BRISTOL. Jour. Anthrop. Inst, j 

1905. 
HUNGARIAN PHYSIOGNOMY. Man. Nov., 1905, pp. 170—172. 1905.1 
COLOUR AND RACE IN EUROPE. HUXLEY MEMORIAL LECTURE) 

BEFORE THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, DELIVERED OCT.j 

31st, 1905. Jour n. Anthrop. Inst. 1905. 



Wills Obititary. 179 

A COXTRIBUTION TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF WILTHHIRE. Wilts 
Arch, Mag., xxxiv., pp. 15-41. Map and Tables. 1905. 

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE WEST RIDING. 
Yorkshire Archceological Journal, xix., 31 — 60. Folding coloured 
"Domesday Map of the West Riding." [The title at the head of 
the paper is "The Ethnology of West Yorkshire," by John 
Beddoe . . . and J. H. Rowe.] 

BRA1)F0RD-0N-AA^0N, A HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION, by RE\r. W. 
H. JONES, M.A., F.S.A., CANON OF SALISBURY, VICAR OF 
BRADFORD-ON-AVON. REPRINTED FROM THE WILTSHIRE 
ARCHAEOLOGICAL MAGAZINE. ANNOTA.TED AND BROUGHT UP- 
TO-DATE BY J. BEDDOE, M.D., LLD., F.R S., 1907. WM. DOTESIO, 
THE LIBRARY PRESS, BRADFORD-ON-AVON. Large paper, lO^in. 
X 7:^in., half linen and paper boards, pp. xvi. -f 275. 
[The second portion of the book has a separate title page, "The 
Hall, Bradford-on-Avon, sometime called Kingston House, by 
Canon Jackson, Reprinted from Wilts Archceological Magazine^ 
Annotated and brought up-to-date by J. Beddoe, M.D., LL.D.^ 
F.R.S., 1907."j 

'' REMARKS " AND " FURTHER REMARKS " OX THE PHYSICAL 

CHARACTERS OF LUNATICS. Nan., 1907, p. 48, and pp. 130—132 

(Sept.). 

DIE RASSENGESCHICHTE DER BRITISCHEN INSELN. Politish A nth. 

Revue. 

ANCIENT SKULL FROM CAVE OF LOMBRIVE, PYRENEES. Bristol 

Nat. Hist. Sac. Proc, 1907-8. 
PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS AT THE BRADFORD-ON-AVON MEETING 
(OF THE WILTS ARCH. SOC), JUNE 29TII, 1909. Wilts Arch. 
Mag., xxxvi., 202-206. 1909. 
REPORT OX THE HUMAN BONES FOUND IN THE LANHILL LONG 

BARROW. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 308—310. 1909. 
REPORT ON SKULLS AND LONG BONES FROM BARROWS ON KING's 
PLAY DOWN, HEDDINGTON. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 315—317. 
1909. 
ON THE DATE OF THE ECCLESIOLA AT BRADFORD-ON-AVON. 

Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 359—363. 1910. 
NOTE ON TWO SKULLS FOUND ON THE ROMANO-BRITISH SITE 

AT WESTr.riv'Y. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 474, 475. 1910. 
MEMORIES OF Kl< : IITV YEARS. Bristol : J. W. Arrowsmith, 11, Quay 
Street, London : Sim])kin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent, cl' (.'omitany. 
Limited, 1 !)!<). Clotli, sij'in. X 5.^in., p]). \i. (including title) -|- 
:V1'-1. l''r('nti>iiirrr, jihoto i)rocess ])ortrait of the author. 

N '1 



180 Recent Wiltsldre Books, Ptmifhlets, Articles, &c. 

Kev. Hichard Garlike Brown. Died July 9th, 1911, aged 63. 1 

Buried at Purton. Educated Marlborough, 1862. Line. Coll., Oxen, 
B.A., 1870 ; M.A., 1873. Deacon, 1870 ; Priest, 1871 (Gloucs. and j 
Bristol). Curate, St. James', Gloucester, 1870 — 72 ; Stanton St. j 
Quintin, 1872—74 ; Mells, Som., 1874—78 ; Tetbury, 1878—81 ; Lect., j 
1879—81 ; H. Trin., Gt. Malvern, 1881—93 ; Rector of Little Somerford, i 
1893 until his death. Much respected in the neighbourhood. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, August 10th, 1911. 



EECENT WILTSHIRE BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, 
ARTICLES, &c. 

{N.B. — This list does not claim to be in any way exhaustive. The Editor 
appeals to all authors and publishers of pamphlets, books, or views in any 
way connected with the county to send him copies of their works, and to 
editors of papers and members of the Society generally to send him copies 
of articles, views, or portraits, appearing in the newspapers.] 

IlHemories of Eighty Years. By John Beddoe, M.D., 

L.Ii.D., P.R.S. Bristol: J. W. Arrowsmith, 11, Quay Street. 
Ijondon : Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent, & Company, Limited, 
1910. 

Cloth, 8|in. x 5iin., pp. xi. (including title) + 322. Frontispiece 
photo process portrait of the author. 

The title of the book exactly describes its scope, and the author irj 
Ms preface tells us that these memories have " scarcely any basis o:| 
journal or record." Wiltshire cannot claim Dr, Beddoe as a native, buj 
only as a resident, for he was born on Sept. 21st, 1826, at Bewdley, anc 
lie came of Shropshire descent. He tells us anecdotes of his childhood 
of his early education, of his intention to become a barrister, and of th 
*' accident " that turned his thoughts to medicine instead. Then h 
passes on to his life in the medical schools of London and Edinburgh 
of the holidays that he spent, always in places worth seeing, and of tli 
multitude of friends and acquaintances that he made, all of whom li| 
remembers, and many of whom afterwards made names for themselve 
in the world. It was during an excursion to the Orkneys in 1852 ( 
that he " seriously began the quest into hair and eye colour which was 
be my principal hobby through most of my after life." Henceforwar 
whether he is tramping through Holland, or Germany, or Ireland 
exploring unfrequented parts of Asia Minor, it is not the remains ^ 
ancient civilisations that are the real object of his journeys, so muc 
as the colour of the eyes and hair and the shape of the skulls of tl 
people he meets with in the markets and the inns. He fraternises wii 



Recent Wiltshire Boohi, Fanipldets, Articles, &c. 181 

everybody and makes a mental note of their ethnological affinities 
whilst he does so. The greater the variety in the nationality of his 
friends the better he is pleased. He goes on a tour in Italy with two 
Swedes, a Finlander, and a Eurasian. Whilst studying in the medical 
schools at Vienna he tells us that he was personally acquainted with 
" men who belonged to at least sixteen different European nations, not 
including Germans of various districts, besides Americans and Asiatics." 
His friends throughout life have been many of them distinguished 
Anthropologists like himself, and the interest of the present volume 
largely consists in anecdotes bearing directly or indirectly on this 
favourite life-study of the author's. 

otes on Wiltshire Names. By John C. Longstaff. 
Vol. I. Place Names. Bradford-on-Avon. Wm. 
Dotesio, The Library Press, 1911. 

8vo cloth, pp. viii. + 166. Price 3/6 net, post free 3/9. 
" These notes on Wiltshire Names," says the author in the preface, 
" set forth no new discoveries, they merely bring together in one volume 
information which hitherto has had to be sought in the works of a 
dozen different writers. Hence the volume is little more than a com- 
pilation, not written for scholars, who, it may be assumed, already 
possess the information contained herein .... This book, then, 
has been prepared for the ordinary reader — the man in the street, the 
youth of studious disposition, the senior schoolboy — who may desire to 
I know the origin and meaning of his own name and of the names of his 
I fellows, as well as the history of the town and village names that meet 
I his eye as he looks at the map of Wilts." " They are now issued with 
much diffidence, in the hope that the reader, while not perhaps agreeing 
with all the conclusions arrived at, will find the subject as interesting 
and instructive as it has proved to the writer." 

The author disarms criticism by this very modest pronouncement of 
the purpose of the book, but he has no need to do so. His work can 
very well stand on its own bottom. It is true that many of the deriv- 
ations given are probably open to considerable dispute, but has any 
work yet been written dealing with such matters of which the same 
cannot be said ? There is a most welcome absence of dogmatism about 
most of the statements here made. In many cases alternative deriv- 
ations are given and the reader is allowed to make his choice between 
them, though in most cases the writer very rightly states his own 
preference. He gives in the preface a list of the authorities he has 
considted. There is a really excellent introductory chapter on '' the 
Keltic, I'voman, Saxon, Scandinavian, and Danish elements" in 
Wiltshire, in wliich nnuli sound sense is compressed into a short space. 
Indeed, taken as a whole, the book is di.^tin.i^nished l»y it> eoniinon 
sense, a (lisiiuction liy no niean> always shareil l'\- writns on h)eal 
Etymologies. The headings of the chapters show the scope of the 
1 work. " Names deii\eil from enclosures :— Ton ; Hams, Burys, Worths, 
Wicks; Nain<'> (haiNcd trom open .spaces, Leighs. Fields, Woods, 



182 Recent Wiltshire Books^ Pcw^Mets, Articles, &c. 

Stokes, Combs, Downs, Deans, Hills, &c. ; Names derived from water, 
Fords, Brooks, Wells, Founts, and Lakes ; Names variously derived and 
not included in the foregoing chapters." Under each name is given its 
equivalent in Domesday and in the Nomina Villarum of 1316, and in 
many cases a word or two as to its history. Altogether a very useful 
and cheap book of reference, in which can be found conveniently 
arranged in a small space information which must otherwise be sought 
in many books not always easily accessible to the general reader. A 
second volume dealing with Wiltshire surnames is promised shortly. 
Noticed, Wiltshire Times, March 10th ; Wiltshire Gazette, March 
30th, 1911. 

DulceDomum. George Moberly (D.CX., Headmaster 
of Winchester College, 1835—66, Bishop of Salis- 
bury, 1869—85). His Family and Friends. By his 

daughter, C A. E. Moberly, with portraits and illustrations. London : 
John Murray, Albemarle Street, W. 1911. 

8vo. Linen. 10s. 6(i. net. pp. xii. + 312. There are two portraits 
of George Moberly and two of Mary Anne, his wife ; a view of Salisbury 
Cathedral, and two views of Winchester, Warden's Garden, and College 
Chapel. 

This book was written, it is explained, for the family, in the first 
place. " In the following story journals, letters, and names are used as 
could only be done in private, or semi-private. The company for which j 
it is put together can hardly be called small, though it is closely related. 
At this moment my Father's and Mother's immediate descendants 
number eighty-one persons. Bishop and Mrs. Moberly had fifteen 
children, all of whom lived beyond childhood, and forty-one grand- 
children ; and they already have twenty-five great-grandchildren . . 
To my many nephews and nieces this story is dedicated, in the belief 
that they will be glad to make acquaintance with the relations that 
they have never seen, and as the generations pass, w^ith those they 
have never heard of." So says the writer of the book, and it is precisely 
this note of family intimacy that gives the charm that the book possesses 
for the general public. For the Wykehamical reader it has of course a 
very special attraction, for the whole atmosphere of the book is pre- , 
dominately Wykehamical, whilst for the Wiltshireman who cares | 
nothing for the things of Winchester, there is the last third of the book, 
which deals with the episcopate of Sarum, and troops of Awdrys and 
Moberlys permanently or temporarily connected with the County of 
Wilts are always more or less in evidence. 

Long and favourable reviews, ^Vm^-s Literary Supplement, March 9th ;( 
Wiltshire Gazette, March 23rd, 1911. 

Cerdic's Landing Flace, by the Hev. Geoffrey Hill 

Vicar of Harnham. Salisbury : Brown &L Co. Price one, 
shilling. [1911.] 

Pamphlet, 8 vo, pp. 24. j 



Ilecent Wiltshire Books, Farn/pldets, Articles, &c. 183 

This is an enlargement of a paper read by the author at the Meeting 
of the Society at Salisbury in 1908, and in it he undertakes to combat 
the view of Green, Freeman, and others, that Cerdic landed somewhere 
in Southampton Water, and to establish his contention that " Cerdice's 
Ora," the place of the landing, was really near Christchurch, twenty or 
thirty miles to the M'-estwards. His argument runs thus. The Saxons, 
like the Danes, aliuays moved up a river as tar as they could take their 
boats, and never landed till they were obliged to do so. The Battle of 
" Cerdicesford," in which Cerdic crushed the Britons in 519, was ad- 
mittedly fought at Oharford, on the Christchurch Avon, twenty miles 
from the sea. Therefore, argues Mr. Hill, Cerdic must have come up 
the Avon river or the Avon valley, instead of following the Itchin to 
Winchester first and then marching across the New Forest to Charford, 
as the historians assume that he did. It was thirty- three years later 
when Old Sarum was taken ; and Mr. Hill supposes either that the 
victory of Charford was really no victory at all, or that the Saxons 
spent those years in slowly fighting their way up the valley of the Avon 
(the distance from Charford to Old Sarum is only twelve miles), and in 
that case he accounts for their slow progress by the fact that " the low 
lying valley of the Avon, about two miles in width, and in the sixth 
century an almost impenetrable morass, must have caused any hostile 
advance to be slow and laborious." But does not this sentence give 
his whole case away? Why it should be assumed that the Saxons 
spent years in laboriously forcing their boats up unnavigable streams 
such as in all probability the Itchin, the Test, and the Avon w^ere in 
the sixth century, or in making their way through the morasses and 
swamps of a valley, when they could reach high and dry land on either 
side of the valley in half-an-hour's march, is hard to understand. The 
Roman roads existed, the Romano-British villages and cultivated lands 
were, as we know, not in the valleys at all, but on the high lands ; and 
surely when the distances to be covered were not more than two days' 
march at the most, it is hardly worth Avhile supposing that the invaders 
spent their energies in struggling up impossible trout streams, when 
chalk downs, good roads, or sandy heaths, were always within a mile 
or two of them. We should not think of doing so ourselves, why should 
we refuse to credit our ancestors with less of the most elementary 
commonsense than any savage tribe possesses at the present day ? The 
whole of the elaborate argument of this treatise takes it for granted 
that the Saxon advance imist have been by the river valleys, at all 
events until after the fall of Old Sarum in r)r)2, when apparently he 
allows that they kei)t to the ui)land and 0])en country. Surely it is far 
more reasonable to sup])Ose that they did so from the first. Mr. Hill's 
main object is to prove that Wilton and not Winchester was for many 
years, ])erhaps for a hundred years, the West Saxon cajntal, as Henry 
of Huntingdon asserts, and that Winchester was held at first, not by 
the West Saxons, but by tho Jutish Meanwara. Wilton " was the town 
■of the settlers on tlif \\'\l\('. and the WnInt valley was the spot troni 
which issued the arni\' that sulxhied what we now eall W'e^sex."' 



184 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

Wiltshire. By Frank R. Heath, with thirty-two 
illustrations, two maps and two plans. London r 
Methuen & Co., Ltd., 36, ISssex Street, Strand 

[1911], 

6in. X 3fin., pp. xi. + 356. Cloth, 2s. Qd. ; leather, 3s. 6c?., net. 

This latest addition to Messrs. Methuen's " Little Guides " series is a 
thoroughly handy and useful book. It is well illustrated, and clearly 
printed on thin paper so that its 360 pages go very conveniently into 
the pocket. Indeed it is probably the best account of Wiltshire in 
small compass which has yet appeared. The introduction, which 
occupies 48 pages, deals with the Physical Features, Geology, Climate, 
Flora and Fauna, Population, Communications, Industries, History, 
Antiquities, Architecture, Celebrated Men, in turn. Each of these 
is necessarily only shortly touched on, but on the whole a very fair 
estimate of the county is given, and there are few mistakes. Perhaps 
the section on the Flora is the weakest. It must be news to many 
people that the Beech and Oak Ferns are to be found within the 
borders of the county ! And it is a pity that one of Mr. Bradley's 
very few slips should be perpetuated here where we are told that the 
turf near Avebury is " blue with Sheeps bit." Is it worth while to 
mention that the common Sowthistle, Purple Dead Nettle, Silverweed, 
Eyebright, Bartsia, and Draha verna are found in certain localities 1 
In what localities are they not found 1 But these are small matters. 
Most of the sections are well done, the geology especially so, and are 
moreover quite remarkably up-to-date, as indeed is the whole book, 
e.g., Mr. and Mrs, Cunnington's recent excavations at Knap Hill are 
recorded (though the sword found there was of Saxon and not of 
Roman date as here stated), and the " Bustard " is an inn again. 
One of the very few instances in which the author's information is 
behindhand is the mention of Chapel Plaster as " desecrated," whereas 
it has been happily rescued from its desecration now for many years. 
Again, the present owner of Bradenstoke is not the builder of the 
Church- The body of the book is arranged as an alphabetical gazetteer 
in which apparently every parish in the county is mentioned, though 
in a large number of cases the smaller places " call for no special 
comment." As a rule two or three lines are given to the Church 
when it is an ancient building, and the more important Churches are 
adequately described. Of course mention of details is not to be looked 
for in a work of this size, except in the more important examples, but 
the information which is given seems generally dependable. There 
are a considerable number of misprints, one curious example being 
that statement that the Church of Broad ToAvn is " Wooden !" which 
evidently should have been "modern ! " whilst the Saxon cross shaft 
stones at Littleton Drew stand on either side of the Church ivalk and 
not of the wall as printed. There is a complete absence of guide book 
twaddle, and the information given is concise and to the point. Last, 
but by no means least, there is an excellent index in which you can 
find almost everything you want. Altogether this little book supplies- 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Famj)ldets, Articles, &c. 185 

a distinct want, and speaking generally, supplies it well. Indeed Wilt- 
shiremen and visitors to Wiltshire alike cannot do better than spend 
half-a-crown upon it as soon as possible. 

The Salisbury Corporation Pictures and Plate. By 
Alderman Charles Haskins, J.P., with an Intro- 
duction by Mr. Lionel Cust, M.V.O., F.S.A., the Kings 

Surveyor of Pictures and Works of Art, formerly Director, Keeper, and 
Secretary of the National Portrait Gallery, London, With ten illus- 
trations. Salisbury, Bennett Brothers, Printers, Journal Office, 1910. 

Cloth 8vo., pp. (including titles, list of subscribers, introduction, and 
preface and contents), xxiii. + 227 + 1 page of corrections and 11 of 
index unnumbered. The illustrations are i)hotographic reproductions 
of the portraits of William Chiffinch ; Sir Ptol)ert Hyde ; John, Duke 
of Somerset ; King Ch. II. ; William Hussey ; Jacob, 2nd Earl of 
Radnor ; Bishop Seth Ward ; Capt. John Wyche ; Henry Fawcett ; 
and Thomas Chubb. 

In this volume are collected the valuable series of articles on the 
Corporation Pictures which appeared in the Salisbury Journal between 
Oct. 17th, 1906, and Jan. 26th, 1907, and have already been noticed in 
Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxv., pp. 147—149. To these are added the article 
on the Corporation Plate and Insignia which was printed in the Salishury 
Journal for July 6 and 13, 1907, and was noticed in W.A.M., xxxv.^ 
pp. 326, 327. A good deal of the information given in this latter 
portion of the work is founded on descriptions of the Maces, &c., given 
in previous volumes of the Magazine, but it is well that it should be 
added to the very full information w^hich the volume contains as to the 
unusually numerous collection of portraits possessed by the Corporation. 
In all cases, full biographical notes on the lives of the persons depicted, 
as well as the history of the portraits themselves are given, and the 
volume makes quite a notable addition to the series of books on 
Wiltshire, designed to supply information not readily to be found else- 
where. 

The Author deserves well of Salisbury and of the County for the 
good work he has here given us, and for that which he projwses to give 
us shortly in a companion volume on the Ancient Guilds of Salisbnr>'. 

Noticed, Salisbury Journal, Dec. 24th, 1910. 

The Oldest Human Industry, by the Rev H G O. 

Kendall. ii'Jio.] 

l*aiii|ililil 8vo, ])]). including title 19. Illustrations of three 
jiala'olit lis from Kn<>\vle l''arni I'it, one ]>ala>olith and one eolith from 
llackiK'ii II ill. ami one eolith from Wintorbourne Bassett, as v.rll as a 
neolithic arrowhead and scraja r. f 'i'o br obtained of the author, i)ost 
free 7(1., Rev. H. (i. O. Kendall, Winterbourne Bassett Rectory, 
Swindon] 

Tile author, wlio for some years lias made a sjierial st U(l\ of t li'- 
earlifi- Hint Mii|)lfmeiit> of tli" Palaeolithic and >M-rallrd l'".olithie 
])ei io.U, ami >o far as North W ilt> i- eonccrned kiio\v> more of its i-aily 
Hint imlu-trifs than an\l)ody el>e, has written and i)ubli>h.'d this little 



186 Recent IViltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

work with tlie view of popularising the study w^hich he himself follows 
so enthusiastically. It therefore begins with very elementary matters, 
butMr. Benjamin Harrison and his Ightham Eoliths come on the horizon 
at page 5, and long before the end is reached there is plenty of strong 
meat for grown men mingled with tbe milk for babes. With regard to 
the much-discussed "Eoliths " the author says, " some people consider 
these to represent an altogether separate and earlier industry (than the 
Paloeoliths) ; e.g., at Alderbury, near Salisbury, they have been found 
by Dr. H. P. Blackmore with never a true Palaeolithic implement 
among them. The same is I am told the case in certain terraces of 
gravel in Hampshire. At the same time implements of Paloeolithic 
shape have been found on the Kentish Downs along with the ' Eoliths' 
and in exactly the same mineral condition. They are older and ruder 
than the Palaeoliths which have been dug out on similar sites from the 
brick earth and they are found in a dififerent deposit, viz., an ancient 

gravelly drift In N. Wilts they are manifestly associated 

with a drift clay. In every case their condition and position, taken 
together, show them to belong to a state of things prior to the cutting 
out of the present river valley system. They have been discovered by 
the author on Hackpen Hill at 875 feet above O.D. (sea level), on Mar- 
tinsell at 940 feet, and on the Winterbourne Bassett fields at 550 feet 

to 600 feet above O-D These implements of Palaeolithic 

type are associated Avith numbers of ' Eoliths,' many of which are 
merely trimmed rectangularly at the edges. The former are as much 
abraded, striated (scratched by grit and ice), and stained brown as the 
latter. The inference is that all are of the same age and industry. At 
any rate it cannot be proven that those of ' Eolithic ' type are any older 
than those of Palaeolithic shape. At the same time, partly on account 
of the immense height above sea level and above most of Wiltshire and 
the neighbouring country .... it is reasonable to conclude that 
these are the oldest human implements and tools yet known in England. 
These things being so, we have not yet in this country got. back to a 

time when man could not make a Palaeolithic implement 

Meantime what is to be said of Alderbury and similar sites ? Perhaps 
that they represent a period of deterioration." It is hardly necessary 
to say that if further study of the question enables the author to make 
good the position he takes up here, his conclusions must have a very 
important bearing on the whole question of the " Eolithic " implements. 
An excellent sixpenny worth. 

ILeminisceuces of the past 80 years. A Paper read 
at the Palace, Salisbury, at the **Orclinatorum 
Conventus." By Francis Lear, M.A., the Arch- 
deacon of Wilts. Jnne 7th, 1910. Price Threepence. 
Brown & Co., Canal, Salisbury. 

Pamphlet, 6|in. x 5in. Preface and title 4 pp., unnumbered -j- 31. 

A very interesting and valuable resume hy one who has probably a 
longer and wider memory of Church matters in the south of the county 
than anybody else now living, of the former condition of things in the 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets^ Articles, &c. 187 

Cathedral, tlie Parish Churches, and Schools of Salisbury, and of the 
growth of diocesan institutions, and of Church Avork in Salisbury under 
the five Bishops (Burgess, Denison, Hamilton, Moberly, and Words- 
worth), 1825—1910, through whose ei)iscoi)ates he has lived. 

Strolls through Salisbury. Guide to Cathedral 

and City. By E. H. .Macdonald. Illustrated with a map, photo- 
graphs, and drawings. By the author and D.A.B. All rights reserved. 
Printed and published at the Journal Office, Salisbury. One shilling 
net. [1911. J 

Pamphlet, T^in. x 4|in., ])p. 112, of which 95— 112 are filled with 
advertisements. There are also eight blank pages for memoranda at the 
end. There is a folding map, and photos or drawings of the Cathedral 
from the meadows ; the Old George ; High Street Gate ; College of 
Matrons ; Seal of Dean and Chapter ; Stones in Close Wall (2) ; In- 
terior, Ground Plan, Tomb of Sir John Cheney, Tomb of Bishop Mitford, 
Inverted Arch, Tomb of Bishop Bridport, Figure of Edward Earl of 
Hertford, N. Choir Aisle, Old Screen, Aumbry in N. Choir Transept, 
Consecration Cross, and West Front, of Cathedral ; Cloisters (3) ; 
Sculptures in Chapter House ; Gateway in Close ; Cathedral from 
Piosemary Lane and from N.E. ; Gates of Alompesson House ; St. Ann's 
Gate (5) ; Chapel of St. Thomas' Church ; Poultry Cross ; Council 
Chamber ; the Canal ; Porch and Niche in St. Martin's Church ; Joiners' 
Hall ; King's Arms Inn ; Porch of Queen's Arms Inn ; Harnham Gate ; 
Audley House ; Koyal Arms from Castle Street Gate ; Stonehenge. 

This is an extremely well-illustrated Guide, which gives strangers in 
a few words as much as most of them want to know, and tells them 
where to go. The Stonehenge paragraph is the weakest thing in the 
book. Phoenicians and Greeks figure in it, and of the stones it is said 
that "they formerly stood about 14ft. above the earth but have sunk 
considerably lower." Otherwise the guide seems quite sensible. 

A Guide to the Church of St. Thomas of Canter- 
bury (Salisbury). By Hdniund Nevill. Price 6d. 

Bennett Brothers, j»rinters, Journal Office, Salisbury. [1908]. 

Pamphlet 8vo., pp. 36. 

This is, as might be expected from its authorship, a solid production, 
containing within its pages a vast deal more reliable information 
than can be found within the covers of most 6(Z. guide books. It 
begins with three pages of introduction, bearing on the early history 
of the City and Church with Mr. Haskins' i)aper on the Church which 
appeared in Wilts Arch. JLn/. xxxvi., 1. Then follow a number of 
notes jiartly taken from Mr. Haskins' papers on the Guilds of Salis- 
bury, in the Salishurj/ Joxirnal ; Merchants Marks, the Doom, the 
various Restorations (a most useful section), Notable Parishioners of 
St. Thomas', the McMiunients in St. Thomas' Church (by the Kev. F. 
I'l. Trot man ), witli sdiiic jKiit iculars as to the iht^oiis and families 
(•onimcnioratcd. Altogftlu'r a ca])ital exaiuiiit' of what a guide to a 
notable Church should \)v. 



188 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamplilets, Articles, &c. 

Transactions of the North Wilts Pield and Camera 
Club. Vol. 2. Published by the Club, 1911. 
Swindon: 1911. 

8vo,, paper covers, pp. 23. Contains a very valuable lecture by 
R. H. K. Hall, B. Sc, on "The Geology of Swindon," occupying 21 
pages, and illustrated by a folding map, five photos of geological 
sections, and seven sections and diagrams. A couple of pages by A. 
D. Passmore on " The Pre-Norman Sculptures at Rodbourne Cheney," 
illustrated by two photos which have already appeared in this Magazine^ 
completes the number. 

Nomansland, a Village History. By H. M. Livens. Re- 
printed from the Salisbury Times and South Wilts Gazette, Oct., 1910. 

Boards, Tin. x 4fiD., pp., including title, 46. Three illustrations : sketch 
of " The Village Green," and process portraits of Josiah King, Faggoter, 
and Elijah Moody, Roadmender. 

This excellent little history of a place which may be said to have no 
history, was noticed in Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 637, when it first 
appeared in instalments in the Salisbury Times, of Aug. 12th and 19th, 
Sept. 2nd and 9th, 1910. 

Wiltshire Parish Registers, Marriages. Edited by W. 

P. W. Phillimore, MA., B.C.L., and John Sadler. Vol. X. London : 
1910. 8vo., cloth, pp. viii. + 149. Contains the marriages of La verstock, 
Hankerton, Brinkworth, Christian Malford, Clyffe Pypard, Heytesbury, 
Knook, Eisey and West Knoyle, transcribed by Revs. A. E. Aldworth, 
F. H. Manley, E. H. Goddard, A. D. Clutsom, G. W. Griffith, and 
Mr. A. H. W. Fynmore. 

Notes on Preemasonry in the Town of Marlborough 

1768 — 1S34. Compiled from various sources. By J. E. S» 
Tuckett, M.A, F.C.S., P.M., and D. of C. No. 1533. Provincial Grand 
Registrar, Wilts, Marlborough : Printed by Lucy & Co., High Street, 
1910. 

Cardboard cover, 9in. x 6in., pp. 42 not including title. Dedicated 
to the Earl of Radnor, Provincial Grand Master of Wilts. 

After an Indroduction on the General History of Freemasonry in 
England, there follows an account of Thomas Dunckerly, a natural 
son of Geo, II., who though not a Wiltshireman "superintended" 
Masonry in Wilts from 1777 until his death in 1795, and probably 
founded the first Lodge in Marlborough of which any records remain. 
In 1768 a Lodge which held its meetings at the Castle Inn was formed, 
and existed until 1777, and on September 11th, 1769, a remarkable 
gathering took place at the Castle Inn. It was a meeting of Free- 
masons to which the general public was admitted, charity was 
dispensed to deserving poor of the town, and Thomas Dunckerly 
delivered his famous address on the subject, " A charge delivei^ed to the 
members of the Lodge of Free and accepted Masons, held at the Castle 



Recent Wiltskire Boohs, rarn/pldelH, Articles, &c. 189 

Inn, Marlborough, at a meeting for the distribution of cha.rity to 
twenty four 'poor people^ at which 7iiost of the Ladies of Marlborough 
were present^ SejyteDiber ilth^ A. L. 5769. By Thomas Dunkerly, Eaq.^ 
Bight Worshipful Provincial Grand Master over the Lodges in llanvp- 
shire, and High Worshipful Master of that Lodged This address is 
here reprinted in full. In 1816 the Wilts Militia coming back from 
Ireland, had its headquarters at Marlborough, and the staff-sergeants 
were quartered in the houses which to this day are known as 
" Militia Court." There has been a Militia Lodge at least since 1807, 
and this became the Lodge of Loyalty, Marlborough, until it ceased to 
exist in 1834. It was re-constituted in 1876. The pamphlet, which is 
excellently printed, ends with lists of members 1817—1828 and a series 
of short biographies of Charles Ivoff, Valentine Day, William Reason, 
John Eyre, John Iludman, Thomas lloff, John W. Brockway, Edward 
Harold (I. k. II.), Michael Cook, John Avery, William Brown, Thomas 
Foster, Richard Wyatt, John Brown, Edward Yockney, Thomas 
Clarke, Richard Tims, Joseph White, Henry Witts, Benjamin Grobity, 
and Charles Wilson. 

Report of the Marlborough College Natural History 
Society for the year ending Christmas, 1909. 

No. 57. Marlborough, 1910. 

In the botanical section, Violo, cornuta is noted as having established 
itself in several large clumps in that part of the Forest adjoining 
Bedwyn Common, and Sedum dasyphyllum on an old wall at Ramsbury, 
of course in both cases these must have been escapes from gardens 
originally. Eight species of Lejndoptera new to the district are recorded ; 
the total number of species now on the list is 1 169. The Blue-headed 
Wagtail {Motacilla flava) has again been observed in the meadows 
where they hatched their young, and the Common Snipe is recorded to 
have nested in 1910 both at Axford and at Chilton. No nest has ever 
been recorded in the neighbourhood before. 

A photograph of Ramsbury Manor Bridge is given. 

The rainfall of Marlborough in 1909 was 32 '64 inches, the corrected 
average for forty-five years being 3l"70. 

The Ruined Temple, Stonehenge, its history and 
short account of questions associated with it. 

By Edgar Barclay. London : The St. Catlicrine Press and 
James Nisbet d- Co., Ltd., '22, Berners Street, W. 

Paper covers, 7|in. X Oin., pp. xxv. + 75. Price Is. net. A good 
coloured view of Stonehenge from the Avenue as frontisi)iece, and pen 
drawings of the Sun Stone or Hele-stone and Sacrificial Stone ; ^'iew 
of Stonehenge from the S. ; The Temple restored from the S. : \'ii\v 
within the Temple ; The ruineil Trilithons ; Four i)lans, of Stonehenge 
restored, of Sarsens and Altar Stone, of Foreign Stones, and of Foreign 
Stones restored ; Statue of Diana of the Kpliesians worsliijipi-d at 
Massilia ; Astrological Diagram ; Maj) of Stonehenge and neiglibour- 



190 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pam^phlets, Articles, &c. 

The author says in his preface " the general conclusions here given 
are those stated by the author in ' Stonehenge and its Earthworks ^ 
(published 1895) ; but views on various details have been revised and 
other matter added ; more especially has the origin of the foreign 
stones been inquired into." In this latter point the chief value of this 
little book consists. The theory which the geological facts are mar- 
shalled to support can only be described as fantastic, but the geological 
facts themselves, derived apparently from iMr. H. H. Thomas, of the 
Geological Survey, are of value. The author rightly pours contempt 
on that most unhappy theory put forward by Prof. Judd that the Stone- 
henge downs were once sprinkled with Sarsen stones as the Marlborough 
Downs are now, and that the Blue stones are erratic boulders found 
near the spot. What, in this case, he rightly asks, has become of the 
Sarsens "? Where on the plain is a Sarsen gatepost, or wall, or piece of 
pitching ? and where will you find even a portion of an erratic boulder 
on or near the Plain ? As to the real place of origin of the " Blue 
Stones " Mr. Barclay says " Mr. Thomas, a specialist in Welsh rocks, 
who has intimate knowledge of this part of the country, assures me 
that Diabase boulders, and also boulders of Grey Felsite, both agreeing 
in their nature with the Stonehenge foreign stones, lie plentifully along 
the eastern shore of Fishguard Bay ; also that such boulders lie scat- 
tered inland .... they are found in the district lying between 
Haverfordwest and Clarbeston. He also assures me that such rocks 
do not occur further south in Devon or Cornwall." Diabase also occurs 
in Scotland in boulders at Leith and about the River Tay. 

Mr. Barclay believes that the Blue Stones came from Fishguard Bay, 
on the Welsh coast, and to transport them to Stonehenge he ingeniously 
calls in the aid of the fleet of Agricola, which made the circuit of 
Britain in A.D., 84, on the conclusion of the campaign in Scotland. On 
the strength of a statement by Tacitus that Agricola in order to 
reconcile the natives of Britain to quiet and tranquillity, encouraged 
them to erect temples, courts of justice, and dwelling houses, Mr. 
Barclay elaborates a theory that the tribes of Southern Britain were 
kept out of mischief by being set to build Stonehenge, the men of 
North Wilts being occupied in transporting the great Sarsens from the 
Marlborough Downs, those of South Wilts and Hants in bringing the 
Blue Stones up the Avon from its mouth, where the Roman fleet had 
landed them after bringing them from Fishguard Bay, or possibly in 
the case of the diabases from the East Coast of Scotland, whilst the 
men of West Wilts and Somerset were charged with the carriage of the 
Altar Stone from the neighbourhood of Frome. 

The Blue Stones therefore commemorate the first circumnavigation 
of the island. As to the story of Nennius and Geoffrey of Monmouth 
of the erection of Stonehenge as a monument to the British chieftains 
slain by Hengist, this refers really not to the building but to the des- 
poiling of Stonehenge and the taking away of some of the stones of the 
sacred circle to form a monument at Amesbury, probably in Ves- 
pasian's Camp. The theory is all highly ingenious and entirely devoid 



Recent Wiltsltire Books, Parn2)hletH, ArticlcH, &c. 191 

of any visible foundation. To take one point alone, is it credible, su]j- 
po.sing the structure to have played the important part in the pacifica- 
tion of Southern Britain that he assigns to it, that it should have borne 
no sign of a Roman inscription setting forth its object and origin, and 
should never have been mentioned by any ancient writer ? Noticed^ 
Wiltshire Gazette, July 27tli, 1911. 

A History of Salisbury by E. E. Dorling^, M.A., F.S.A. 

London: James Nisbet A: Co., 22, Berners Street. 1911. 

Boards, Tin. x 4:|in., x)p. x. -j- 193. Illustrations from pen drawings 
of Cathedral from N.W., Old Castle, Close Wall, Church of St. Martin, 
Palace, Harnham Bridge, Church of St. 'Thomas, St. Anne's Gate, 
Trinity Hospital, Poultry Cross, Joiners' Hall, College of Matrons. 

As might be expected this little book is a scholarly epitome of the 
history of the city with which it deals. Moreover it is written in a 
picturesque style which makes it very readable. The prominent facts 
are emphasized and the details where they are given are such as serve 
to illustrate and to explain the main course of the story. In the earlier 
chai)ters on Old Sarum the author's imagination is allowed to fill up 
the spaces where history is at fault, but with the foundation of the 
present Cathedral he finds himself on ground which he has made his 
own. His account of the building, both in its history and its archi- 
tecture, is excellent. The newest light available is always requisitioned, 
and his work is by no means mere compilation from earlier accounts. 
Of the Cathedral itself, after an ecstatic description of the beauty of 
its exterior, including even the west front, which he boldly declares, in 
the face of much modern criticism, to be neither a sham nor a failure, 
but a very fine screen for the display of sculpture, he turns to the 
interior, of which he truly says, " It has been so cruelly scraped and 
tidied ; it is so bare and flooded with light ; so much that was venerable 
and beautiful has been sacrificed to the craze for vistas, and the desire 
to make a glorified Parish Church of it. What the misguided zeal of 
reformers left has been ruthlessly swept away by the vanity of restorers, 
and the trail of Wyatt, its evil genius, is over it all." The monuments 
and the heraldry, of course, come in for their due amount of notice. 
He records that Bichard of Farleigh was the builder both of the belfry 
and of the tower and spire, and that the former was begun in 1334. 
Family history, of the Earls of Salisbury, for instance, occupies a con- 
sideraV)le space, whilst the general tendencies of history in their relation 
to the growth and devclo])ment of the city are sufficiently dwelt ujton. 
and the character and work of the successive ]]islioi)sare concisely and 
judiciously summed up. The story ends with the death of Bisho]) Seth 
Ward in 1687/8. "The scope of this little book is the beginning 
of things and something of their development rather than thoj^e 
matti'vs which may be gleaned from guide books and newspa])ers. fn^m 
memoirs and the recollections of contem])oraries." There arr two 
valuable a])pfndii'es, on tlu; name and arms of tlir city. As to the 
name, the Koman Soyhiodunuin and the rarliei- Saxon Searoln/ritj 
btManic in later Saxon days *S'm)r6e'>/ and in Domesday iUH)k San'sheri. 
\\y liiOU it was Sarcsberia, by 12r)0 the r was doubled, 6^jnw6ma, 



192 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pampldets, Articles, &c. 

Sarresbiriensis, and the contracted form Sarrum. In Edward First's 
reign we read of Nova Sarum and Vetus Sarum. Bishop Wyvil first 
described himself as Episcopus Sarum. Sarum is thus " not a ghost- 
name. It is a genuine word coined thus early which has continued in 
use as the name of the city and the diocese until our own day. But 
the word is really a kind of slang," arising from the fact that Skr, used 
as the contracted form of writing Saresherie and Saresheriensis, would 
equally stand as the common contraction for Sarum, and accordingly 
the name came to be so pronounced and spelt. In an English document 
of 1375 the name is New Saresbury, and in 1429 Richard JSTevill, Earl of 
Salisbury, signs himself B. Salisbury, the earliest example of the 
modern spelling known to Mr. Dorling. 

The arms of the city granted at Harvey's Visitation of Wilts in 1565 
are azure four bars gold, corrupted later into Barry of eight fieeces azure 
and gold (Campden's Visitation of 1623, and the city seal of the 17th 
century). There are also other corrupt variations. The supporters of 
the city arms are Tivo eagles gold ivith two heads, collared ivith crowns 
azure and having their beaks and legs azure. 

The question of the singular attribution in MS. M. 3 at the College 
of Arms, Azure a flag gold and a sword silver having its hilt gold crossed 
saltire^vise and a chief silver ivith three loze^iges gules therein to the see 
of Salisbury, arms which have been taken to be the ancient arms of the 
city, is also discussed. Noticed, Wiltshire Gazette, Aug. 10th, 1911. 

Shepherds of Britain. Scenes from Shepherd Life 
past and present from the best Authorities by 
Adelaide L. J. Gosset. London : Constable & Co., 
1911. 

Pp. xxiv. + 332. 7s. 6c?. net. Numerous illustrations. 

" The scope of the book " says the authoress in her preface, will 
appear from a glance at the contents list. It comprises chapters on 
" Shepherds — their Flocks and Dogs," " Sheep Marks and Tallies," 
"The Wool Harvest," ''The Care of Wool," "Shepherds' Garb," 
"Arts and Crafts," "Pastimes," and "Pastoral Folklore." These 
subjects are treated in great variety by extracts from books and 
periodicals by a number of writers. Under the heading of " Shepherd 
and Flock, Wiltshire," we find " The Shepherd of the Plain," by P. W. 
D. Izzard (from Daily Mail, 1910) ; " Lazy Shepherds of the Plain and 
an Exception," by the author ; " Wiltshire Shepherds, 17th Century '' 
(from The Book of Days ; Edited by Eobert Chambers ; 1869) ; 
" Wiltshire Shepherd Customs," by Ed. Jefferies (from Wild Life in 
Southern County, 1880) ; " Characteristic Wiltshire Shepherds," by A. 
G. Bradley (from Round about Wiltshire, 1907). In the section on 
" Marks and Tallies " the plan of recording the number of sheep by 
notching sticks is described at length, and the correspondence of the 
peculiar singsong words used in counting up to twenty with old and 
modern Welsh numerals is urged as a proof that in them we may still 
liear relics of the counting words used by ancient British shepherds in 



Recent Wilts] tire Bouks, Paiivplilets, Artieles, &c. 193 

days of old. The words, as in many x^rimitive languages, run in 
groups of five, four of which have some sound in common and the fifth 
being different, caused by counting on the four fingers and thumb. 
Do any of our readers know of these ancient numerals as still in use 
by slie]:)herds in Wilts ? Yan (1), tan (2), tHhera (3), 2>ethera (4), pm^p 
(5), &c. 

The manufacture of riveted iron sheep bells at Market Lavington 
is described ; and the bell-founder family of Wells is referred to. 
Their factory was not in Somerset as stated, but at Aldbourne, in 
North Wilts. The suggestion that "K.VV." often found on cast 
globular pack-horse bells refers to one Richard White, a founder at 
Reading in 1520, rather than to Wells, of Aldbourne, does not commend 
itself. Chambers' Book of Days is laid under contribution for the 
interesting account of how the indefatigable and musical minister of 
Bishops Cannings, in Aubrey's time, entertained King James I. at the 
Bush in Cotefield with bucolics of his own making sung in four parts 
by well trained parishioners, wearing frocks and whips like carters. 
And how, when the Queen returned from Bath, the minister and his 
flock received her at " Sheppei'd Shord " with a pastoral performed in 
shepherds' weeds. That formerly popular sport, backswording, comes 
in for a well-written notice by Miss Salmon. There is an article on 
the various breeds of sheep in which, however, the now extinct old 
Wiltshire sheep of great size with big horns is not mentioned. 

The Filling in of the Eastern Ditch at Oliver's 

Camp, near Devizes." An article in The Antiquary, June, 
1911, pp. 219-221, by Albany F. Major (Sec. to the Earthworks Com- 
mittee). The writer deals with the difficulty presented by the filling in 
of the deep eastern ditch of the camp {see Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxiv., 
408) which has apparently been done on purpose, above the 5ft. of 
chalky rubble silt found at the bottom of the 13ft, which now represents 
the depth of the filling. The writer rejects the suggestions put forward 
by Mrs. Cunnington that the ditch may have been purposely filled 
up, either after the capture of the camp by the Romans for the purpose 
of " slighting " the stronghold, or at some subsec^uent period, because a 
deep ditch may have been dangerous to cattle. He argues that in 
neither of these cases would the material to fill the ditch have been, as 
it apparently has been, brought from a distance, but that the bank 
would naturally and obviously have been thrown into it, as indeed 
Mrs. Cunnington lierself suggests. " All the peculiar features of the 
case would be accounted for, if we suppose that the camp had at some 
])eriod during Roman or IJomano-lh-itish times been the object of 
military oi)erations in the course of which the eastern ditch was filled 
in to facilitate assault on the vulnerable side of the cam]). In such a 
case it would have been necessary to bring the materials from a distance 
so that the work could be done suddenly and without warning to the 
defenders. Suili iiiattiials would naturally have been obtained from 
waste griiund and iuMii>li heaps in the iiriudil»ourliood oi the position 
occui)ied 1>\ the attackiuLr forcr. Tlii^ wituKl exjilain the presence of 
VOL. XXXVII. — No. (XV. O 



194 Becent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

fragments of broken pottery. With a force of archers and slingers posted 
to keep down the rain of missiles from the defenders of the rampart, and 
perhaps with the help of some such siege contrivance as the classic 
" testudo " for their protection, all the men available could have been 
employed in bringing up the material in baskets and throwing it into 
the ditch, and the filling in would be done very speedily. It may be 
objected that, in this case, to fill up the whole length of the ditch seems 
needless labour, as a storming party could have made its attack at one 
or more selected points. But if suflicient men were available it would 
be good strategy to compel the besieged to spread their resistance along 
their whole front, instead of allowing them to concentrate it on particular 
points of attack. We may safely say that such a mode of assault, if 
the attacking force were sufficiently numerous, could only end in the 
ditch being at last filled, and the way cleared for the storming of the 
rampart." No doubt this is true, but has Mr. Major considered how 
many hundred thousand half-bushel baskets of earth it would take ta 
fill the ditch to a depth of 8 or 9 feet, and where on Roundway Down 
the surface mould could be found to do it with 1 Moreover, if this 
method of attack had been adopted at Oliver's Camp, surely it would 
have been also adopted elsewhere, and of this there is no evidence 
whatever. Moreover, it seems incredible that anyone would deliberately 
set to work to fill the whole length of the ditch. On one point Mr. 
Major and the Rev. C. W. Whistler, whom he quotes, are certainly 
wrong. The " Iron object of unknown use " [Fig. 6 in Mrs. Cunning- 
ton's paper] is most certainly not " a very evident caltrop." To anyone 
who has examined the object itself, and compared it with a precisely 
similar object from the downs near Swindon, in the collection of Mr. 
A. D. Passmore, it is evident that the four pointed ends of thin iron 
could never have served the purpose of a caltrop, but were apparently 
intentionally curved over to meet each other, for some unknown purpose. 
This is pointed out by Mrs. Cunnington in a letter to the Antiquary 
of July, 1911, vol. vii,, p. 280, in which she also combats the theory of 
the filling in put forward by Mr. Major. 
Kiichard Batt, Clothier, of Devizes. An abstract of his will dated 
1612 is printed in Wiltshire Times, June 17th, 1911. 

Hmmeline Fisher was the twelve year old daughter of the then 
Rector of Poulshot. Her mother was a cousin of William Wordsworth. 
Some of her verses having been shown to the poet he wrote,= "the 
verses upon the Queen are exquisite and tempt me to ask, though not 
without hesitation, that as Emmie has, I am told, such a fine feeling 
for music, she would make an attempt to fit the noble music of " God 
Save the King" with better and more appropriate words than are 
ordinarily joined with it. A request to this effect was made to myself 
from a person high in office. I tried, but could not succeed— your 
inspired little creature may be more happy in her effort," Emmeline 
accordingly wrote an improved " God Save the Queen," which appears 
in the Fortnightly Review, April, 1911, and is reprinted in the Wiltshire 
Times, June 17th, 1911. 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles j &c. 195 

Oxen at the FlOUg'h.. An interesting article on the use of oxen as 
draught animals in Wiltshire, and of the reasons for their discontinuance, 
appears in the Wiltshire 2'imes, Dec. 31st, 1910. It is perhaps dou]>tful 
whether their use survives at present anywhere in the county, though 
up to even ten years ago there were many teams at work on the down 
farms. 

Amesbury. Article on its history, Wiltshire Times, Dec. 31st, 1910. 

Local Review of 1910. Wilts Advertiser, Dec. 29th, 1910. 

Thomas Long*, clothier, of Trowbridge. His will, dated 1554, is 
printed in Wiltsldre Times, April 22nd, 1911. 

The Private Devotions of Elizabeth Wightwick. 
1781. Born 1699, Died 1787. Aged 88. [1905] 

Pamphlet, r)fin. X 4in., pp. including title and preface 66. Printed 
(for private circulation) by Edward Green, the Broadway Press, Frome. 

The compiler of this (considering its date) very remarkable little 
MS. book of Devotions, which has never been printed before, was 
Elizabeth {nee Waight) wife of the Kev. Henry Wightwick, fellow of 
Pemb. Coll., Oxon, whose early married life was passed at Dauntsey. 
He then moved to Tetbury and from 1740 to his death in 1763 was 
Pector of Ashley, Wilts. The heading of the MS. runs thus : " This 
book contains the Rules for the Festivals of the year, and for Sundays. 
In this manner I have practised it, and I advise my children to follow 
the same if tliey shall think fit." Elizabeth Wordsworth contributes 
an interesting and appreciative preface. 

Rural Deanery of Avebury (Cannings portion). 
Memorial Tablets, &c., and Church Plate, AD 
1910. 

Wrappers, 8vo., pp. including title 113. 

This substantial book compiled by Canon W. Gardiner, Vicar of 
Southbroom, the present Rural Dean, contains an apparently careful 
and exact copy of all the monumental inscriptions now existing in the 
Churches of the Cannings Deanery, as well as a very full account of the 
Church Plate, giving hall marks, weight, inscriptions, and descrii)tions 
of each se])arate ])iece, It is in fact a model which might with the 
greatest advantage be followed by all Pural Deans, and Canon 
Gardiner has deserved well of North Wilts in printing it. That such 
inventories are by no means works of supererogation is proved by the 
fact that under Stanton St. Bernard Canon Gardiner notes that a 
Pewter Flagon noted by Mr. Nightingale in Wilts Church Plate in 1891 
"has now disap])cared and nothing seems to be known as to its 
disapi)earance." Tliis fine pewter vessel however at tlir time these 
lines were written was a ])rominent exhibit in a loan collection of 
pewter at Taunton M u-^cum, belonging to ^^r. Charbonnit-r, anil was 
;u-tu;illy illu-t rated in tin- '' ( Juide " to that collection I'ublished by the 

2 



196 Recent Wiltshire Books, PampJdets, Articles, &c. 

Somerset Arch, and Nat. H. Society, as having belonged to " Stanton 
St. Bernard, Gloucestershire." Canon Gardiner's attention having 
been drawn to this, he followed the matter up with the most laudable 
pertinacity. It appears that the executors of a late vicar had sold the 
flagon, strangely believing that it was his property, and it had passed 
into the hands of a dealer, from whom Mr. Charbonnier bought it. 
The latter, on being appealed to, at once offered to restore it, if the 
price he had paid for it was refunded. This sum was collected by 
Canon Gardiner, and the Flagon (of which a full-sized drawing taken 
before its disappearance is preserved amongst the drawings of the 
Church Plate of North Wilts in the Library of the Museum at 
Devizes, so that there could be no doubt whatever of its identity) 
is now happily restored to its rightful home at Stanton St. Bernard. 

Kotes on Semlngtou Monumental Inscriptions. 

Article by A. Schomberg in The Genealogist, N.S., vol. vi., pp. 116 — 118, 
Oct. 1910. The wills of Thomas Sumner, of Littleton, in Steeple 
Ashton, 1631 ; of Thomas Somner, of the same, 1668 ; of Joan Richmond, 
of the same, 1694; of Thomas Somner, of Wellow (Som,), 1699; of 
Edmund Blagden, of Keevil, 1733 ; and of Thomas Gerrish, of Seming- 
ton, 1740 ; are here printed at length. 

Sarum Marriage Xiicences transcribed by the Rev. E. R. Nevill, 
F.S.A., were begun in The Genealogist, July, 1907. vol. xxiv., part i., 
N.S., and have been continued up to the present time. 

Mere and WinterslOW. Article in the Daily Mail, Dec. 7th, 
1910, by W. Beach Thomas, "The Triumph of the Small Owner— 
what I saw in Wiltshire," describes, not too fully, the newly-started 
farm colony at Mere, and gives a few words to Major Poore's more 
famous and successful organization at Winterslow, which has been in 
existence since 1892 and is here held up as the model for all rural 
England to follow. 

The Foundation of Salisbury. " A Civic design of the Middle 
Ages." Article in the Builder, reprinted m Salisbury Journal, Nov. 12th, 
and Wilts County Mirror, Nov. 11th, 1910. "The greater number of 
the English towns founded prior to A.D. 1700 are the result of a growth 
so slow as to be only comparable to evolution, It is the more interesting 
to find one city at least, that of Salisbury, to wit, which sprang into 
existence in as sudden a manner as a goldfield's settlement." An in- { 
teresting article on the planning of the city. 

The Battle of Edington, A.D. 878. This is an article in 
Blackwood's Mag., Oct., 1910, pp. 491—601, by the Rev. William 
Greswell putting in shorter space the arguments in favour of the 
Somersetshire site for the battle which he has given at greater length 
in his book recently published, and noticed in Wilts Arch. Mag., 
xxxvi., 632. 

Saydon. "Shepherds at Work." Article by Ch. McEvoy in Daily 
Mail, March 25th, 1911. A column of literary musings. 



Recent WiltHhire Boohs ^ Fam'pldets, Articles, &g. 197 

^ Devizes. Under the heading " An Interesting Old Devizes Diary," the 
Wiltshire Times of March 2n(l, 1911, and two subsequent issues, prints 
extracts from the diary or note book of George Sloper, baker, of 
Devizes, from 1753 to 1782. The notes relate to various Devizes 
matters. Amongst them under 1791 is this note :" This spring and 
summer Edward Eyles, Esq. (ye Govener), pulled down the great 
house on ye Green and built a new one." 

In 1782 " Mr. Broadley's servant maid, Elizabeth Stow, for stealing 
two or three white handkerchiefs, found guilty and publickly whipped.'^ 
Calne. Bentley's School. A Petition to the King in 1687, 
signed by a number of the chief inhabitants of Calne, i)raying for the 
confirmation of the appointment of a new schoolmaster, Mr. Avery 
Thomson, in the place of James Webb, who was, as they certify, " a 
man of debauched and vicious life and conversation and remiss and 
negligent of his duty," is printed in Wiltshire Times^ January 7tli, 1911, 
which also contains notices from the registers of Ogbourne St. George 
in 1632, 1633, and 1639, of payments of from xij'^ to ij'. to one Looker 
for " whipinge the doggs out of the Church." 

Winterslow, Major Poore's Iiand Scheme. An article 

y on this very remarkable experiment, begun in 1893, and now in most 
successful working, by which Major Poore has given an object lesson 
in the methods of establishing peasant proprietorship on a firm footing 
to the whole of England, appeared in Tlie Nineteenth Century, Jan., 
1911, and was reprinted in the Wiltshire Times, Jan. 7th, 1911. The 
constitution and working of the Land Court, by which the affairs of 
the thirty-seven heads of families who now practically own their cottages 
and liohlings, is described. 

Stoneheng'e. In an article on "Prehistoric Puzzles in Stone" in 
Forward, an American periodical, the origin and purpose of Stone- 
henge are discussed without apparently any knowledge of recent 
excavations. The part of the article concerning Stonehenge is re- 
l>rinted in Wiltshire xiduertiser, November 17th, 1910. 

Worked Flints from the River Drift at Holt, Wilts. 

]jy W. G. Collins. A. paper in the Antiquarij^ May, 1911, N.S., vol. 
vii., pp. 170 — 183. The author describes half-a-dozen small flints 
which ho illustrates, collected in the gravel pit near the station at 
Holt, where, underneath 2 feet of reddish soil, 4 feet of small oolitic 
gravel occurs resting on Oxford Clay. This gravel contains very few 
large stones and no large flints have been found in it, but a number 
of small Hakes of (lint occur in it, many of which seem to 
l)resent undoulttiMl signs of human working. They ai'c such as may 
be picked up l»y thousands on any neolithic site, but tlirir presence in 
1 tlie river gravel certainly seems to carry them back to I'aheolithic 
I times and therefore gives them a considerable interest. No detiniti'ly 
formeilimi)lements have been f.Mnul, for the Hint here illustrated whicli 
' is shaped like an arrowhead, can liardl> he assumed t«> lie such with 
any certainty, 'i'lic llint> here ilhisti-atiMl ha\-e been given by .Mr. 
Collins to thr S(M-iclv'> ,Mn>runi. 



Ii98 Recent Wiltskire Boohs, Pani'phlcts, Articles, &c. 

IiOngford Castle. Account of-the visit of the Hampshire Field Club 
on June 29th, 1910. Salisbury Journal, July 2nd, 1910. 

Salisbury, S. Wilts, and Blackmore Museum. Annual 

Meeting and Report. Salisbury Journal, July 30th, 1910. 

Citizen Potts of Trowbridge and the Chartist Riots 

of 1839. Note in Wiltshire Times, Oct. 15th, 1910. 

Chippenham. An article on the history of Chippenham, one of the 
" Picturesque Wiltshire " series, appeared in the Wiltshire Times, April 
15th, 1911. 

Woad grown in Wiltshire. The Wiltshire Times, April 15, 1911, 
has a note on the fact that 342 acres of woad were sown in Wiltshire 
in Elizabeth's reign, contrary to the royal proclamation. 

Wiltshiremen in London. 24th Annual Dinner 

in the King's Hall, Holborn Restaurant, London, W. C. , on Saturday, 
March 11th, 1911. Chairman, Kichard Burbidge, Esq. (President of 
the Association). Reprinted from the Wiltshire Gazette, March 16th, 
1911. Pamphlet 4to., pp. 15. with portraits of Richard Burbidge, and 
G. B. Moore, (secretary) and photo of Littleton Park. 

George Herbert, his Iiife and Influence. Sermon 

preached November 2nd, 1910, in Salisbury Cathedral by Canon 
Warre, Rector of Bemerton. Wilts County Mirror, Nov. 4th ; 
Salisbury Journal, Nov. 5th, 1910. 

Old Sarum Excavations, 1910. A good account of the worl£ 

done during 1910, which ended on Oct. 29th, is given in an article by 
Lt.-Col. W. Hawley, F.S.A., in Wilts County Mirror, Nov. 4th, 1910. 

The Longs of Dray cot. An article on the Long family, and 
the descent of Draycot Manor. Wilts County Mirror, Nov. 11th, 1910, 

The IiOngf Family. Review of a type-written book by Walter 
Chitty, of Wilcot, challenging Mr. W. H. Long's right to the ownership j 
of his estates. Wiltshire Advertiser, Nov. 3rd, 1910. i 

Caster ley Camp. A lecture on the excavations at this camp, by 
B. H. Cunnington to the N. Wilts Field Club at Swindon, is partially ; 
reported in Wilts Advertiser, Feb. 2nd, 1911. j 

Eating^ of Meat in Lent. The Wiltshire Times, April 29th, 
1911, contains a long and interesting list of the ale-house keepers and 
other tradesmen of North Wilts who in 1620 entered into a recog- 
nisance of £10 and found two sureties each in £5 that they would eat 
no meat during Lent, before the justices at Warminster and Trow- 
bridge. 



Recent Wiltshire Boohs, Fmnphlets, Articles, &c. 199 

Wiltshire Notes and Queries. After considerable delay the 
numbers of Wilts Notes and Queries due for 1910 have appeared in 
quick succession under the new editorsliip of the Rev. F. H. Manley. 
Nos. 68—72, from Dec, 1909, to Dec, 1910, have thus been issued, 
forming part of vol. vi. Through these numl)ers run continuations of 
"The Chrysom Book of St. Thomas, New Sarum," by the llev. E. K. 
Nevill ; "A Calendar of Feet of Fines for Wilts," (Nos. 68, 69, and 72) ; 
"Peculiars of the Dean and Chapter of Sarum " ; " Quaker Burials in 
Wiltshire " ; " Notes on the Hydes of Wilts and Cheshire," by J. J. 
Hammond (with portraits of Lawrence Hyde of Heale, eldest son of 
Sir Lawrence Hyde, Amphillis his wife, Alexander Hyde, Bishop of 
Salisbury, and a folding pedigree) ; " Steeple Ashton Churchwardens' 
Accounts " by the Eev. E. P. Knubley ; " Notes on Morse of Rodbourne 
Cheney" (Nos. 68, 71, 72) ; "Five Ancient Deeds at Sherston Magna" 
by the Rev. W. Symonds; " Wiltshire Wills proved in the Prerogative 
Court of Canterbury (Nos. 69, 70, 71) ; " Palmer Memoranda," by the 
Rev. F. H. Manley (Nos. 69, 70) ; " Marlborough Poll Tax, 1379," 
printed in full, by the Rev. Chr. Wordsworth ; " Association Oath Rolls 
for Wiltshire " (No. 68) ; note on the Rev. Richard Kent (1615—1652) 
Rector of Fisherton Anger and Sub-Dean of Salisbury (No, 69) ; " Rev. 
John Collinson, Historian of Somerset " (No. 69) ; " John Felling, 
Rector of Trowbridge, 1622," by Ed. Kite (No. 70) ; " The Will of John 
de Waltham, Bp. of Salisbury," by Ed. Kite (No. 70) ; " The Washington 
Memorials at Garsdon " with two illustrations (No. 71) ; " The Will of 
Joan Trye, 1533, mother of the last Abbess of Lacock," by Ed, Kite 
(No. 72) ; "The Tympanum of the Rood Screen at Dauntsey " (with 
painting of the Doom), by the Rev. F. H. Manley (No. 72) ; " Smith 
Family of Donhead St. Andrew," by J. J. Hammond (No. 68) ; " An 
illustration of a Penny of Stephen's presumably coined at Devizes 
(No. 68) ; a note on Miss Elizabeth Ogilvy Benger, known as a Wiltshire 
authoress, who, however, apparently only lived at Devizes between 
1797 and 1800 (No. 68). 



200 



BOOKS AND AKTICLES BY WILTSHTEE AUTHORS. 

Stephen Reynolds (native of Devizes). "'Puffin' home." An 
article on the building and working of a motor boat on the South Devon 
coast. Blackivood' s Mag., Oct. 1910, pp. 478—490. 

" Jasper Braund's Boat, a Longshore Yarn." T. P.'s Mag.^ 

March, 1911. 

Alongshore : where Man and the Sea face one another." 

With illustratioiis by Neville Mackay. 1910. London: Macmillan & Co. 
Price 8s. A book of the South Devon Coast and Sea. Noticed in 
Wiltshire Advertiser^ Nov. 3rd, and Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. I7th, 1910. 

" Benjie and the Bogey Man." A story of the fishermen 

of the S. W. Coast. Blackwood's Mag., Feb., 1911, pp. 190—201. 

Rev. E. J. Bodington. Sermon preached at Calne Church, to the 
Mayor and Corporation, Nov. 20th, 1910. Printed in Wiltshire Gazette, 
Nov. 24th, 1910. 

Maurice Hewlett. '^Tolstoy." A poem of three stanzas 

Fortnightly Review, Dec, 1910. 

" Brazenhead the Great." A story. Smith, Elder, & Co.^ 

London. 1911. Price 6s. Reviewed, Times Literary Supplement^ 
March 30th, 1911. 

" On Fairies." English Ttevieiv, March, 1911. 

Rev. C. S. Fugfll. Sermon preached at Southbroom Church, Dec, 
25th, 1910. VvmtQdiin Wiltshire Advertiser, T>Q(^.19\h,l^iQ. 

£lla Noyes. " The Casentino and its story." Illustrated in colour 
and line by Dora Noyes. 1910. London : Dent. F'cap 4to, cloth^ 
10s. Qd. net. 

iEnima Marie Cailard. " The Rationale of Spiritual Healing." 
Article in Contemporary Bevieiv, April, 1911. 

Mary Arnold - Porster. "The Right Honourable Hugh 
Oakeley Arnold-Forster. A memoir by his wife. London : Edward 
Arnold, 1910." 

Demy 8vo, pp. including title, xv. + 376. Five illustrations including 
3 portraits of Mr. Arnold-Forster, a bibliographical list of his writings, 
and index. 

This biography of one who was private secretary to W, E. Forsterr 
in Ireland, 1880—82. M.P. for W. Belfast 1892—1905 ; M.P. for Croydonl 
1906—1909 ; secretary to the Admiralty 1900—1903 ; and Secretary of 
State for War 1903 — 1905, dying in 1909, is written by his wife Mary 
daughter of Mr. N. Story Maskelyne, the preface being dated fromj 
Basset Down, Oct., 1910. Reviewed at length and very favourably by 
the chief London papers. i 



7yoo/.;.s and Articles ly WiUsJdre Authorn. 201 

G-. D. Armour. "Mr. Jorrock'.s Lectors. From Surtees's Handley 
Cross." London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1910. Price lO.s. 6ri. net. 
Edition de Luxe, £2 2s. net. A series of twenty-five coloured illus- 
trations of the original text. [About two years ago Mr. Armour brought 
out a volume entitled " Hunts with Jorrocks " (10s. 6V/, net), a series of 
illustrations of the same book, with which the present scries is uniform. 

Rev. Canon Douglas Macleane. " The Great Solemnity of 

the Coronation of a Iving and Queen, according to the use of the Church 
of England, with Notes, &c., by Douglas Macleane, M.A., Canon of 
Salisbury." George Allen ct Co. London. 1911. 

Cr. 8vo, cloth, ^■)S. net ; leather, 10s. 6ri. net. The book contains many 
notes, liturgical, historical, and descriptive, with an introduction by the 
Bishop of Salisbury. Noticed favourably, Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, 
June, 1911. 

Metcalfe, Rev. C. F. "A Sermon preached in All Saints', White- 
parisli, by tlic Ilev. C. F. Metcalfe, Vicar, at 3 p.m., on Friday, May 
20th, 1910, being the Day of the Interment of His late Majesty King 
Edward VII. Published at the request of the Parish Council. A. R. 
Mowbray & Co., Ltd., Printers, London and Oxford." 

Pamphlet, cr. 8vo, pp. 8, with portrait of King, and extract from 
minutes of Parish Council. Text, E.ev., xiv., VS. 

Edward Slow, of Wilton. TheJ/ommr/Zeat/er, Jan. 27th, lOU, 
has a column descriptive of an interview of its correspondent with ^Ir. 
Slow, headed "A Dialect Poet of Wiltshire." 

■ " Reckerlections an Yarns of a Woold Zalsbury Carrier var 

auvcr vivty years. Ptote in tha Wiltshire Dialect. Contents : Hearly 
Reckerlections. Tha New Spring Van. Teaken auver Fiather's 
business. Tha Weddin as diden come off. Motors an Hayershii)s. 
Salisbury : R. R. Edwards, 6, Castle Street. [1910.] 

Pamphlet, (Uin. X 4^in., pj)., including title, 61. Excellent Wiltshire 
talk, like its many predecessors by Mr. Slow. 

Lt.-Col. Pedder. *' Primavera" art. in Gonteniporary Review, May, 
1911. 

Nelson PrOWer. " Freddy Barton's Schooldays, by Nelson Prower, 
M.A. London : John Ouselcy, Ltd., 0, Fleet Lane, Farringdon Street^ 
E.G." [1911.] 

Cloth, T^in. X 4; in., ])p., including title, 27;'). A story of Private 
School Life. 

Rev. Canon Warre. Sermon i)reache(l in SiiJisbiiry Gatlic.lral at 
tlu! annual fcstiviil in commemoration of Founders and Benefactors, 
Nov. '2ud, 1910, {;ii "George Herbert," is printed in fnll in S<ilishur>/ 
Diocesan Gazette, Dec, 1910, \^\^. 207—209. 

Rev. T. J. Laurence, LLD., Rector of Lpton Lov,>ll. ''The 
Declaration of London and l\...d Stuffs." Article in Cnntnnpnvnrtf 
Review, Maivli, I'.Ml. 



202 

WILTSHIKE ILLUSTEATIONS. 

Wilton House, The Hall. Photo process. The Connoisseur^ Dec, 1910, 

p. 248. 
Devizes, St. John's Tower, and Purton Church Tower illustrated, pp. 55 

and 255, of Towers and Spires, their design and arrangement. By E. 

Tyrrell Green, 8vo. London, 1908. 
Beaufort Hunt Point to Point Races at Easton Grey. Four photos. " The 

crowd at the finishing point." "The Duchess of Beaufort, Lady 

Blanche Somerset, and the Duke of Beaufort." " Miss Chester Master 

and Mr. and Mrs. Chester Master." " Miss Gwatkin, Mr. Gwatkin, 

Miss Pollen, and Miss Wyld." The Queen, March 18th, 1911. 
Sir John Fuller. The five silver dessert and flower stands, and the jewel 

presented by the Liberals of W. Wilts to Sir John and Lady Fuller on 

his appointment as Governor of Victoria, are illustrated from process 

blocks in Wiltshire Times, April 15th, 1911. 
Duke of Beaufort's Hounds, Opening meet at Brinkworth. 2 photos in 

Queen, Nov. 5th, and 7 photos in Illust. Lond. News., Nov. 7th, 1910. 
^'Taglioni" Coach (1837) still used by Captain Spicer (of Spye Park). 

Country Life, Nov. 26th, 1910. 
The Seat or " Carrel " in Bishops Cannings Church, reproduced from the 

Wilts Arch. Mag. in '' Wood Carvings in English Churches, Stalls and 

Tabernacle work ; Bishops' Thrones and Chancel Chairs,^' by F. Bond, 

1910. 
Chippenham Depot of " Wiltshire Farmers, Limited." Cut in Wiltshire 

Times, Jan. 14th, and photo in Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. 12th, 1911. 
Trowbridge Reserves Football Team. Wiltshire Times, June 3rd, 1911. 
Marlborough, The New Post Ofiice. Sphere, March 18th, 1911. 
Roundway Harriers. Process. Daily Graphic and Wiltshire Gazette, June 

1st, 1911. 
^' Finding a Fox in Savernake Forest," and " A well-known figure with the 

Tedworth." Two sketches by G. D. Armour, in Country Life, April 

29th, 1911. 
*' A Huge Stack of Horseshoes " at Studley, near Trowbridge. Process. 

Wiltshire Times, May 6th, 1911. W 

The Last Cattle Market held in Chippenham Streets. Process. Wiltshire ^ 

Times, May 13th, 1911. 
*'A Night Scene at Amesbury Station." " West Down Camp, Salisbury 

Plain, gathering hay." " Building the oven at West Down Camp." 

Sphere, August 13th, 1910. 
Shadower (the Police Bloodhound). Country Life, May 27th, 1911. 
Malmesbury Market Cross. Cut. Wiltshire Times, June 10th, 1911. 
Wilton, Lord Pembroke's Dairy. Photo. Daily Express, June 10th, 1911. 
French Aviators visit Devizes. Wiltshire Advertiser, Jan. 19th, 1911. 
Sheep Shearing competitions at Axford, with interesting accounts of the 

various sheep shearing " gangs " in N. Wilts, and their work. Three 

photos. Wiltshire Advertiser, June 17th, 1911. 
Malmesbury Abbey, 4 cuts, and Market Cross, with letterpress account of 

Town and Abbey. Wiltshire Times, July 1st, 1911. 



203 



WILTSHIRE rOKTKAlTS. 



Wiltshire Mayors, 1910—11. W. Small (Cliippenliain) ; T. Butler (Swindon); 

E. A. Wilson (Salisbury); W. V. Moore (Wilton); T. Free (Marl- 
borough) ; W. Pound (Calne) ; A. L. Forrester (Malmesbury). Portraits 

and biographical notices, Wiltshire Times^ Nov. 12th, 1910. 
Lady Tennant and her children. Qi^eeTi, March 11th, 1911. Lady Glenconner, 

Country Lifey March 27th ; Queen, June 24th, 1911. And her two 

sons, Queen, July 22nd ; Country Life, Aug. 12th, 1911. 
Hon. Mrs. Percy Wyndham (of Clouds). Full-page photo. Country Life, 

Oct. 29th, 1910. 
Samuel King, of Warminster, Baptist preacher and colporteur, with long 

account of his life and labours. Wiltshire Times, Nov. 19th, 1910. 
Eev. Canon E. G. Wyld, Chairman of Salisbury Diocesan C.E.T.S. Annual 

Report of C.E.T.S., Salisbury Diocese, for 1909. 
Mrs. Calley (of Burderop), with Pekingese dogs. Process. Queen, Dec. 

24th, 1910. 
Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke. Process. Queen, Dec. 24th, 1910. 
Capt. Walter Long, D.S.O., and Miss Sibell Johnstone (Mrs, Walter Long). 

Process. Queen, Dec. 24th, 1910. 
Sir J. M. Fuller, M.P. Cut in Wiltshii-e Advertiser, Dec. loth, 1910, and 

election portraits. 
Sidney J. Pocock, born at Broom, near Swindon, Liberal Candidate for 

East Wilts, 1910. Photo, Wiltshire Advertiser, Dec. 24th, 1910, and 

election portraits. 
Piobert Henry.son Caird, of Southbroom House, Coronation Mayor of 

Devizes. Wiltshire Advertiser, Nov. 10th, 1910. 
Lance-Corporal Blanchard, of Chii)])enhani. IVocess. Wiltshire Tinies^ 

Jan. 21st, 1911. 
G. LI. Palmer, and Hon. Geoffrey Howard, Candidates for West bury 

Division, February, 1911. Process. Wiltshire Times, Feb. 11th, 1911. 
\\. Peto, M.P. Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 8tli, 1910. 
Hon. Geoli'rey Howard, M.P., West Wilts. Wiltshl ir Adv> rtis> r, Ft-b. 9tli ; 

W/'Ks/iire Times, Feb. 25tli, P»ll. 
^\'illl;ml (;iiigell, sixty-two years Tiirisli ( 'Icrk of Castk' Combe. ]\'d(shire 

I'nnes, Feb. 25 til, 1911. 
llirhanl Burbidgc, b. at South Wraxall. Wdtshi,- Tlmr,^ Marrli ISth; 
Wiltshire Ga:r((r, Marrli Kith ; \Vdf.</a're Adnrtis, r,y\Au\\ IGtli, 1911. 



204 Wiltshire Portraits. 

G. B. Moore. Wiltshire Gazette, March 16th ; Wiltshire Advertiser, March 

16th, 1911. 
Lt. W. LI. Palmer, s. of G. LI. Palmer, of Lackham. Coloured portrait. 

10th Hussars Gazette, March, 1911. 
John Ferrett. By her will Miss Ellen Taunton Little, of Bath, left to the 

Parish Church of Bradford-on-Avon, to be hung in the vestry, a portrait 

in oils of John Ferrett, founder in 1747 of a Book Charity and Bread 

Charity at Bradford. Wiltshire Times, April 15th, 1911. 
The Marchiones of Lansdowne. Portrait in oils by J. J. Shannon, R.A. 

Royal Academy Exhibit., 191 1 . Reproduced in various illustrated pub- 
lications, including a full-page process illustration in the Lady's 

Pictorial, May 6th, 1911. Process. The Queen, Feb. 11th, 1911, 
The Marchioness of Ailesbury, by Frank Dicksee, R.A. Portrait in oils. 

Royal Academy Exhih., 1911. 
Rt. Hon. W. H. Long. 823h€re, Jan. 8th, 1910. 
Lord Lansdowne. Sphere, Jan. 8th and June 25th, 1910. 
James Parker, Bandmaster, Chippenham. Wiltshire Times, May 27th, 1911. 
Sir John Fuller in his uniform as Governor of Victoria. Wiltshire Times 

May 27th, 1911. 
Harold E. Gorst, Prospective Liberal Candidate for N.W. Wilts. Process. 

Wiltshire Times, May 13th 1911. 
Rev. R. L. Whytehead, s. of Rev. H. R. Whytehead, of Warminster, and 

Miss C. M. Barbour (Mrs. R. L. Whytehead). Process. Queen, May 

13th, 1911, 
Rt. Hon. George Wyndham. Sphere, Jan. 8th, 1910. 
Rev. J. M. Rees, Pastor of the Tabernacle, Chippenham. Wiltshire Times^ 

June 3rd, 1911. 
Major Justly W. Awdry, of Chippenham (received by the King as a Veteran 

Volunteer Officer at the age of 93). Wiltshire Times, June 3rd, 1911. 
Miss Annette Furness (Mrs. C. G. Bryan), d. of Mr. Stephen Furness, of 

Berwick St. James. Queen, June 3rd, 1911. 
Miss Honor Grove (Mme. Golejewski), d. of Sir Walter Grove, of Sedgehill. 

Queen, June 3rd, 1911. 
F. E. N. Rogers. Presentation portrait by Glyn Philpot. Photo. Wiltshire 

Advertiser, Feb. 23rd, 1911. 
William Underwood, of Devizes, 1866 and 1911. Small photos. Wiltshire 

Advertiser, Jan. r2th, 1911. 
Sir E. P. Tennant. Wiltshire Advertiser, March 9th, 1911. 
Rev. P. A. Nash, Rector of Trowbridge. Wiltshire Times, July 8th, 1911. 
Rev. J. Grieves Ferriday, Primitive Methodist Minister, Chippenham. 

Wiltshire Times, July 8th, 1911. 
Alfred Wheeler, Master of St. Edmund's School, Salisbury. Wiltshire 

Times, July 15th, 1911. 
Daniel Lucas, founder of Trowbridge Cooperative Society, with letterpress 

account. Wiltshire Times, July 15th, 1911. 



205 



ADDITIONS TO MUSEUM AND LIBRAEY. 
Museum. 

Presented by Me. F. Lane : Roman bronze tweezers and earpick, iron 
hobnails, and bronze spindle Avliorl, found with interment 
at Honeystreet. 
, „ Mr. S. Butler: Bronze awl, fibula, earpick, and other small 

bronze articles from Kennet. Small Roman Vjronze figure of 
lioness found near Newbury. 
„ ,, Mr. H. E. Medlicott : Impression of seal. 
„ „ Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Cunnington, with the consent of Sir 
William L. Stucley, Bart. : a series of objects found during 
the excavation of Knap Hill Camp, 1908, 1909 ; also, with 
the consent of the War OfKce, a series of objects found dur- 
ing the excavation of Casterley Camp, 1909, 1910. Rush- 
light holder from Ashton Keynes. Bronze age pin found at 
Shepherd's Shore, 1911. Roman pot, brilliant coloured glass 
bead, and cone of pottery, found on site of Roman villa at 
Bromham. 
,, Mr. Allan, of Devizes : Devizes token. 
,, Mr. R. H. Caird : Silver and copper coronation medals struck 

for Devizes, 1911. 
„ Mr. J. P. E. Falconer : Painted plaster with head of figure 

on it from Box Roman villa. 
„ ;Mr. W. He ward Bell : Purton token. 
„ Mr. F. W. GrODDARD : Hawfinch (hen bird) found dead at 

Clyffe Pypard. 
„ Rev. E. H. Goddard : Casts of Wiltshire seals. 
„ Vice-Admiral the Hon. Sir Hedworth Lambton, K.C.B. : 
Two of the Roman pewter plates found at Manton and 
afterwards preserved in Lady Meux's Museum at Theobalds 
Park. 
„ „ The following members towards the cost (^'6) of the purchase 
from the Rev. H. G. O. Kendall of a series of eighty 
Paheolithic Implements from Knowle Farm Pit : Mr. W. 
Heward Bell, £1 10s. ; Rev. E. H. Goddard, £1 : Mr. E. 
Cook, 10s. ; Mr. B. H. Cunnington, .ts. 
„ ,, IIkv, H. G. O. Kendall : A series of Eolithicand Paheolithic 

implements from Hackpen and Knowle. 
„ „ Mr. Bones : Old " game carrier." 
„ „ Rev. C. Y. Goddard : Earthenware pot — ? paint jiot— dug up 

in Britford churchyard, 1910. 
„ „ Mil. W. G. Collins : Worked flints from Holt gravil pit. 
An mipubli-lii •! Wiltshire tradesmen's token of the 17th century fouml 
at Mere has \n-vu rr'-i-ntly addi'd to tlic Society'.s collection, by purchase 
from Mr. T. 11. I'.akri. 

WILLIAM . willins * = Traile Mark. ^. 

* OF WESTBVRY LY . = . W. \V. M 



206 Additions to Library. 

Library. 

Presented by The Authoe (Mr. C. Haskins) : " Salisbury Corporation 
Pictures and Plate," 1910. 
„ „ Mk. C. Penruddocke : Photograph of a letter dated Feb. 6th, 
1642, and signed "Charles R." to the " trusty and well 
beloved " John Penruddock, desiring him " forthw*'' to 
lend us the sum of one hundred pounds for our necessary 
support and the maintenance of our army." 
„ „ The Author (Mr. J. E. S. Tuckett) : " Notes on Freemasonry 

in the Town of Marlborough, 1768—1834." 1910. 
„ „ The Author (Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D., F.R.S.) : " Memories of 

Eighty Years." 1910. 
„ „ The Publisher (Mr. W. Dotesio) : "Notes on Wiltshire 
Names, by John C. Longstaflf. Vol. I. Place- Names." 
1911. 
„ „ The Publishers (Messrs. Methuen & Co.) : " Wiltshire, by 

Frank R. Heath. 1911. The Little Guides series." 
„ „ The Rev. F. H. Manley: Work by Rev. John Panke, of N. 

Tid worth. 
„ „ Mr. W. F. Lawrence : Sermon preached at Whiteparish. 
„ ,, Mr. H. E. Medlicott : Mr. W. H. Long's Estate Sale 
Particulars ; Salisbury " Diocesan Gazette " ; " N. Wilts 
Church Magazine " ; and " Wiltshire Gazette," for 1910. 
Four parts of Erlestoke Sale Particulars, 1910. Lord 
Lansdowne's Foxham Estate Sale Particulars, Election 
Papers. Parcel of Old Deeds connected with Hilperton, 
&c. Fourteen other Sale Particulars. 
„ The Author (Mr. E. Slow) : " Reckerlections an Yarns of a 

Woold Zalsbury Carrier." 1910. 
„ The Author (Rev. H. M. Livens) : "Nomansland, a Village 

History." 1910. 
„ Mr. J. P. E. Falconer : Bell Rubbings ; Catalogue of the 

Phillipps' Sale. 
,, The Compiler (Canon W. Gardiner): "Rural Deanery of 
Avebury (Cannings portion), Memorial Tablets, &c., and 
Church Plate." 1910. 
„ The Baroness von Roemer : Photograph of Seal of Richard 

de Combe of Littleton. 
„ Mr. H. W. Dartnell : " Poems and Translations," by G. E. 

Dartnell. 1910. 
„ The Author (the Rev. H. G. O. Kendall): "The Oldest 

Human Industry." 1910. 
„ The Rev. F. H. Manley : " The Private Devotions of Eliz- 
abeth Wightwick." [1905], 
„ The Author (Mr. A. Schomberg) : Notes on Semington 

Monumental Inscriptions, from the Genealogist. 
„ The Author (Ven. Archdeacon Lear) : " Reminiscences of the 
past Eighty Years." 1910. 



Additions to Lil 



'jvary. 



207 



Presented by The Executors of the Late Miss M, A. Ewart of Coney- 
hurst, NR. Guildford : Water Colour Drawing of the 

Old Houses at Potterne. 
Miss Ewakt, of Broadleas : Water Colour Drawing of the 

Old Houses in Wine Street Alley, Devizes. 
The Author (the Eev. E. K Nevill, F.S.A.) • "A Guide to 

the Church of St- Thomas of Canterbury." (Salisbury). 
The Author (Mr, W. G. Collins) : Paper from the Antiqwiry 

on " Worked Flints from the River Drift at Holt." 
Mrs. Buxton : A Collection of old Deeds connected with 

Tockenham, &c. 
Mr. B. Lansdown : The "Wiltshire Times" Newspaper; 

Trowbridge Pamphlets. 
Mr. Butcher : Notes, scraps, &c., connected with Devizes ; 

and impressions of seals. 
Mrs. Story Maskelyne : Thirteen Papers by the late N. 

Story Maskelyne, F.R.S. "The Right Hon. Hugh 

Oakeley Arnold-Forster, a memoir by his Wife," 1910. 

" Worlebury, an ancient stronghold." Notes on Wrough- 

ton (excerpts from Parish Magazine). 
Mr. R. H. Caird : Pamphlets. 
Mr. H. W. and Miss Dartnell : A number of cuttings and 

scraps. 
The Publishers (Messrs. J. Nisbet & Co.) : *'' The Ruined 

Temple of Stonehenge," by Edgar Barclay, 1911. "A 

History of Salisbury," by the Rev. E. Dorling, 1911. 
Mr. E. St. B. Sladen : Drawing and Sketch Map of Sarsen 

Stone at Stanton St. Bernard. 



208 







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THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued). 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo. 
pp. vii., 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. IN THE REIGNS OF HEN. III., ED. L, & ED. II. 8vo. 
pp. XV. -j- 505. In parts as issued. Price 13s. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY of the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONEHENGE and AVEBURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 96, Dec, 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c., by 732 authors. 

The Tropenell Cartulary. 

Tliis very important genealogical and topographical work in 2 
vols., 8vo., pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds connected 
with property in many Wiltshire parishes, of the 14t]i & 15th 
centuries, has recently been published by the Society, and issued 
to subscribers. Only 150 copies were printed, of which a few 
are left. Price to members, £1 10s., and to non-members £2. 
Apply to Mr. D. Owen, ]^ank Cliambers, Devizes. 

ADVERTISEMENTS. 

A certain space on the cover of the Magazine will in future be 
availal)le for Advertisements of Books or other kindred matters. 
For terms a})])ly to the Eev. E. H. Goddaud, Clyffe Vicarage, 
Swindon. 



Wiltshire Place Names, 

Being Vol. J. of Wiltshire Names by J. C. LONGSTAFP, 

Demy 8vo, Cloth, viii.— T66 pp., 3s. 6d. net, Post free, 3s. 9d. 

The work is scholarly ... is a useful addition to the growing,' list 
of works of its class. — Antiquary. 

\ have already dii)i)ed into it with enjoyment. —J. Reddoe, M.D., F.R-S., 
L1..D. 

WM. DOTESIO, The Library Press, Bradford on- Avon, Wilts. 

FOR SALE.— A COMPLETE SET OF THE AVILTS AUCII. iA[AG. 
JJduiuI half-calf extra. What offers ? 

Back Numbers of Wilts Arch, Mag. to mako up sets can bo hail. 

BOOKBINDING. -The Archu'olo-ical ^r;i,t;aziiu> carefully bound to 
palUTii. Msiinuitea ^iven. 

I/V/'/ -C. H. WOODWARD, 

Printer and Publisher, Devizes. 



WANTED 
SIR THOMAS LAWRENCE'S 

PENCIL DEAWINOS, ENGRAVINGS after same, and AUTO- 
GRAPH LETTERS of the artist.— Write to Edward, 26, King 

Street, St. James', S.W. 

. . THE . . 

North Wilts Mnsenm and 
LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annnal subscriptions 
varying from £2 to 5s., to tlie amount of about £37 a year for tliis' 
purpose liave been given l)y al)out eighty Members of the Society, 
and the fund thus set on foot has enabled the Committee already 
to add much to the efficiency of the Library and Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least' 
£50 a year, in order that the General Fund of tlie Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the other purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, an( 
should be sent either to Mr. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizesj 
or Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 

Objects of Antiquity 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes. • 

Old Deeds connected with Wiltshire Properties, 

Books, Pamphlets, Articles, Portraits, 
Illustrations from recent Magazines or Papers, 

bearing in any way on the County, or the work of Wiltshire 
Authors, will be most gratefully received for tlie Library by 
the Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyfie Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. 
Librarian. 

C- H. WOODWARD, MACHINE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



x;^^9H^ 



No. CXVI. DP:C., 1911. Vol. XXXVIL 



THE 

WILTSHIRE 

Irrjufiikigirul imli liiifiirnl listnrti 

MAGAZINE, 

^Oublt^tjeH untrer ti)e SBtrrrttOH 

OF THE 

SOCIETY FORMED IN THAT COUNTY 
A. D. 185 3. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. IT. GODDARD, Clyfee Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

ruiNTKI> AND SOLD FOR THK SOCIKTY HY C. II. WoODVVARD, 

t, St. John Strkkt. 



*'MAPS OF WILTSHIRE" Xumloi 

'''"''' ~'' '''^- ^I'^ni.r, (.mil. 



NOTICE TO MEMBEES. 

TAKE ISTOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols. 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society /or 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The N^umbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
tions, but in accordance with J^yelaw No. 8 "The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and the 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
tary : the Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

THE BKITISH AND KOMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. C. Smith, M.A, One Volume, Atlas 
4to, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo, 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev. T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s, ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION or ANTIQUITIES 
IN THE SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Price Is. 6d, 

CATALOGUE of ANTIQUITIES in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM. 
Part II. 1911. Fully illustrated. Price 2s, 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I„ II., and IIL, 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and MAPS, in the SOCIETY'S 
LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY'S 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. and 
3s. 6d. (except in the case of a few numbers, the price of which is raised). 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 

STONEHENGE AND ITS BARROWS, by W. Long— Nos. 46-7 of the 
Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
reliable account of Stonehenge and its Earthworks. 

WILTSHIRE— THE TOPOGRAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OF JOHN 
AUBREY. F.R.S., A.D. 1659-1670. Corrected and enlarged by the Rev. 
Canon J. E. Jackson, M.A., F.S.A. In 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates, 
price £2 10s. 



WILTSHIRE 

ilrrljanikigiral mi Jiiitarnl li^toiij 
MAGAZINE. 



No. CXVL DECEMBER, 1911. Vol. XXXVII, 



Contents. 



PAGE 



A Descriptive Catalogue of the Printed Maps of Wiltshire 
FROM 1576 TO the publication of the 25in. Ordnance 
Survey, 1885 : By T. Chubb, of the Map Room, British 
Museum 211 



I)1'.\'1/1CS: C 11. Woodward, t. Saint Ji)hn Stkkkt 



THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



MULTORUM MANIBUS GllANDR LEVATUR ONUS." — Ovld. 



December 1911 



A IJESCKIPTIYE CATALOGUE OF THE FEINTED MAFS 
OF WILTSHIEE FKOM 1576 TO THE FUBLICATION 
OF THE 25in. OKDNANCE SUFVEY, 1885. 

By T. Chubb, of the Map Room, British Museum, 

F KEF ACE. 

Thirty years' experience in the Map Eooni of the British Museum 

has shown nie the great need of county hihliographies of maps. 

A good start in this direction was made by Sir Herbert George 

Fofdham with his " Hertfordshire Maps," published in the Tran- 

rf.ions of the Hertfordshire Natural History Society and Field Cluh, 

1901 — 7, and issued as a complete work in 1908. This was 

followed by his " Cambridgeshire Maps," which, after appearing 

in the Covimnnications of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society^ was 

•\ho separately publislied in 1908. In the meantime, Mr. William 

Uarrison [)roduced his useful "Early Maps of Lancashire and tlieir 

' Makers,'^ which appeared, in 1907, in voL 25 of the 'Transactions 

! i^ the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society. As far as I 

' am aware, no other serious attempt has been made to grapple with 

tlic subject. 

I have, therefore, attempted to supply the want in the case of 
Wiltshire, the county of my birth; and I am hopeful of l)eingabK' 

• deal with the rest of tlie counties as opportunities arise. 
Vol.. XXXVII. — NO. cxvi. P 



212 Maps of Wiltshire. 

Looking backward to the infancy of the art of cartography, the 
first place is taken by the *' Peutinger Table," made, probably, in 
the 12th century. This is the earliest existing map showing any 
part of Great Britain, but it only represents the South-East Coast 
of England, which portion was reproduced in Gouglis British 
Topography, 1780. 

In the 13th century, Richard of Cirencester made a map of 
Britain ; and, in a manuscript of Matthew of Paris' History, written 
about the middle of the 13th century, is a map bearing the title: 
"Britannia, nunc dicta Anglia, qu?e complectitur Scociam, Gale- 
weiam & Walliam." This also was reproduced in GoiigKs British 
Toipography. 

The earliest engraved map of the British Isles, as a whole, is 
one by George Lilly, son of the grammarian, which was published 
in 1546, at Eome, where Lilly had lived some years with Cardinal 
Pole. 

The first engraved map of England and Wales is one by 
Humphrey Lloyd, published in Abraham Ortelius' Additamentum 
Theatri Orhis Terrarum, 1573 ; but the first survey of the Enghsh 
Counties was made by Christopher Sax ton, whose work was pub- 
lished in 1579; and the next important atlas was that issued by 
John Speed in 1611. 

Early map makers based their productions upon those of Saxtoii 
and Speed down to 1773, when their work gave place to that of 
Andrews and Dury, until the publication of tlie one-inch Ordnance 
Survey in 1817. 

Eeturning to the subject of this catalogue, it should be explained 
that the arrangement pursued is chronological, according to the 
dates of the maps themselves — not the dates of the works in which 
they appeared. When, however, the map is undated, the date 
followed is that of the work in which it occurs. Eeprints and 
later editions are given under the year in which they were issued, 
and take precedence of the new maps of that year. 

Except where otherwise indicated, each map has been examined! 
and systematically described. The title, the names of the author 
and engraver, the scale, and the imprint, are given exactly as on 



Bu T. Chuhh. 213 

the plate: also the actual size of the map in inches. A detailed 
description follows giving all other particulars appearing on the 
plate; and any text at the hack of the map is noted. 

Last of all, except where a map has heen separately published, 
the full title of the work in which it appeared is given ; and oc- 
casionally, a biographical note has been added. The titles, being 
given in detail, incidentally furnish a complete record of the Atlases 
of England and Wales. 

The majority of tlie maps are in the liritish Museum; but I am 
indebted to Mr. George Goode, of the Cambridge University Library, 
for the description of a number of maps of Wiltshire under his 
charge; and I have availed myself of information contained in the 
valuable catalogues of Sir H. G. Fordham, 

^ly work terminates at the publication of the 25-inch Ordnance 
Survey, 1885, there being nothing of antiquarian interest after 
that date. 

'J'lie tabular index, in which the maps are arranged \inder the 

names of authors, engravers, and publishers, shows at a glance the 

whole of the work for which each individual is responsible, and, 

more especially, the life of any particular map — its various editions, 

its different forms, and the works in which it has appeared. 

Thomas Chubb. 
Mav 6th, 1911. 



1576 

Wiltoniae Coniitatus (herbida Planitie nobilis) hie 

ob oculos proponitur. Anno Dni. 1576. Christo- 

phorus Saxton descripsit. Heniigius Hogenber- 

gius SCUlpsit. 18^' in. X 16.] in. 

/// [an atlas of KNCLAND and WALK.s, I'.V (IIKls'roj'IlKi; 

SAXTON, I.nNI)C)N.] 1 579. I'ol. 

Shows th(i towns, villiif^'es with the churches, hundreds, and forests. 
Tlie rivers are a prominent feature. The hills are shown pictoriallv. 
In spaces in the ornanu'ntal niar^'in arc: " SepteiUrio," " Oricns," 
" Meridies," " Occideiis." Top Icfl-liaiul coiner, the royal arms with 
supporters, with 1'' on the hl'i ^ide of the crown ami K on the other. 



214 Ma^s of Wiltshire. 

Below, an elaborate cartouche encloses the title ; and, in a smaller one, 
appear the arms of Thomas Seckford, Master of the Bequests to Queen 
Elizabeth (Thomas Seckford was patron of Saxton's work of surveying 
the whole of the country). In left-hand bottom corner, an open pair of 
compasses stands upon a scale of ten miles. Saxton's name is printed 
within the compasses, above the scale, and Hogenberg's name below. 

Christopher Saxton was a topographical draughtsman, born at Tingley, 
near Leeds, He was educated at Cambridge, but at what college is not 
known. Afterwards he came to London and was attached to the house- 
hold of Thomas Seckford, at whose instigation and expense, and with 
the authority of Queen Elizabeth, he surveyed and drew maps of every 
county of England and Wales. 

This was the first survey of the counties of England and Wales. The 
dates of the maps range from 1574 to 1579. They were drawn by Saxton 
and engraved by Augustine Kyther, Eemigius Hogenberg, Cornelius 
Hogius (or Hogins), Nicolas Reynolds, Leonard Terwoort, and F. Scatter. 
The complete atlas was issued in 1579. Copies are now very rare, and 
one sold at Christie's, in 1901, realised ^£90. 

The date of Saxton's death is uncertain ; but he was alive as late as 
1596, when he surveyed and described the town of Manchester. 

1607. 

Wiltoniae Comitatus herbida planicie nobilis, vulgo 
Willshire pars olim Belgarum. Guiliam Kip 
sculp. Scala miliarum, 5 [ = lf inches.] 14in. x lliin 

In BRITANNIA SIVE FLOEENTISSIMORUM EEGNOEUM ANGLIC 
SCOTIiE, HIBERNI^ . . . GUILIELMO CAMDENO AUTHORE, 
LONDINI, IMPENSIS GEORGII BISHOP JOANNIS NORTON, 1607. fol. 

Based upon Saxton's Map of Wiltshire. With text in Latin on back. 

Shows towns, villages, hills, trees, enclosed parks, and rivers with the 
bridges. The relative importance of the towns and villages are indicated 
by the towers and spires of the churches. The hills are greatly 
exaggerated. 

Top left-hand corner, the title enclosed in an ornamental cartouche. 
Bottom left-hand corner, a pair of open compasses standing upon a scale 
of five miles, and the engraver's name given in a small panel attached 
on the right. Bottom right-hand corner, an indicator of the cardinal| 
points. 

1610. 
A reprint of tlie 1607 map. 

In [PHILEMON HOLLAND'S TRANSLATION OF CAMDEN'S BRITAN 

NIA] 1610. fol. 

The compass indicator has been altered by the addition of an inter- 
mediate point and a ring enclosing the whole, and there is no text on back, 



By T. Clmhh. 215 

Wilshire. Performed by John Speed, and are to 
be sold in Popes head alley against the Ilxchangre, 
by John Sudbury and G. Humble. The scale of 
English miles, 10 [ =3 J inches]. 20] in. x 15in. 

Shows towns, villa<(e8, enclosed parks, rivers, bridges, and hills. An 
engraved boundary line marks the hundreds. Stonehenge is shown as 
being enclosed. The hills are somewhat coarsely drawn. 

Top left-hand corner, a plan of the city of Salisbury, To the right of 
this, the title in a small cartouche. Below the plan, in two columns, " The 
Arms of the Earls of Wilshyre & Salesburye." Top right-hand corner, 
a view of Stonehenge. Below, an ornamental panel containing a 
description of Stonehenge, and, suspended from this, an indicator of the 
points of the compass. On the right, enclosed by a double line joining the 
border, the imprint. Below the imprint and compass indicator, the scale 
of ten miles. At the top of the panel containing the title, "21 Gradus 
Longit." Above the view of Stonehenge, " '22 Grad. Long." Just above 
the imprint, " Minuta 10 ultra 51 grad. Latitudinis." The border is 
formed by a double line, a space of \ inch, and a second double line 
marked off into minutes and seconds of latitude and longitude. Between 
the border lines, " Septentrio," " Oriens," " Meridies," " Occidens," and 
on the east and west, a double spiral device. 

An impression before the engraver's name was added. 



1611. 

Wilshire. Performed by John Speed. . . Jodocus 
^ Hondius cselavit. Anno 1610. 

' In THE THEA.T11E OF THE EMPlllE OF GUE^VT BKITAINE 

PRESENTING AN EXACT GEOGllAPHY OF THE KINGUOMES OF 

I ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND THE ILES ADJOYNING . . . 
BY JOHN SPEED. IMPRINTED AT LONDON, ANNO 1611. fol. 

Another edition of the preceding map by J. Speed. It has certain 
additions and corrections : the latitude and longitude are erased and the 
ornamental border continued along the top and bottom ; the cardinal 
points are given in I'^nglish instead of Latin ; in the margin of the inset 
plan of Salisbury, " Tiie forme of the Counsel House" has been added ; 
the note on Stonehenge has been extended ; reference letters are added 
to the various shields and coats of arms ; and the engraver's name has 
been added at the bottom of the map. The map occupies two pages, 
being 25 and '26 of the atlas. Printed on the back (page 25) : "liook I. 
Wiltshire. Ciiap. 14," followed by ten paragraphs of text ; and (page 26) 
"Book 1., Chap. 14," followed by a list of the Hundreds in seven 
columns. 



216 Maps of Wiltshire, 

John Speed, an historian, was born at Farndon, Cheshire, in 1552. 
His father was a member of the Merchant Taylors' Company, and, fol- 
lowing his father's trade, he himself was also admitted to that Company 
in 1580. He took a keen interest in the antiquities of his country, and 
Sir Faulk Greville discovering this, made him an allowance in order that 
he might be free to devote his whole attention to study. 

Between 1608 and 1610 Speed published a set of fifty-four maps of 
England and Wales. These maps were probably issued separately. 
Some were printed before the plates were finished, as evidenced by the 
blank cartouches on them, while on others the engravers' names are 
wanting. Both omissions were rectified in later copies. A collection of 
the early impressions is in the British Museum. 

The first complete atlas published by Speed was his Theatre of the 
Empire of Great Britain, London, 1611 — 12, fol., which was issued as 
part of Speed's History of Great Britain. The first three books bear 
the date 1611 ; book IV., Ireland, being dated 1612. 

1614. 
Another edition of Speed's Atlas. 

Referred to by Sir H. G. Fordham. The map of Wiltshire would 
probably be an unaltered impression of the 1611 map. 

1616. 
A reprint of Speed's map of 1611. 

In [a. latin TEANSLATION of speed's atlas, by PHILEMON 
HOLLAND,] 1616. fol. 
With the addition, at back, of a Latin text. 

I have not been able to examine this edition ; but there is a copy in 
the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, 

1617. 

Wiltonia. Scala miliari, 10 [ = 1J inches]. 4fin. x 3 Jin. 

In GUILIELMI CAMDBNI, VIRI CLARISSIMI BRITANNIA . . . j 
IN EPITOMEN CONTRACTA A REGNERO VITELLIO . . . AMSTEL- 
REDAMI, EX OFFICINA GUILIELMI JANSONIJ, 1617. obl. 8vo. 

Quite a small map, reduced from Saxton's map of Wiltshire. Shows 
towns, villages, hills, rivers, bridges, and, between Trowbridge and 
Warminster, a clump of trees. The map has a plain double-lined border, 
from which the lettering " Septen," " Oriens," " Occidens," "Meridies,"j 
is omitted. Top left-hand corner, an ornamental cartouche encloses the 
title. Bottom left-hand corner, another cartouche contains the scale.! 
The engraver's name is not given ; but the map was probably engraved j 
by Petrus Kaerius (Peter Keer), as his name appears on some of the! 
other maps in the same work, all of which have Latin text at the back.! 



By T. ClmJjJj. 217 

Another copy of the previous map. 

The text; wi'ifcten on a separate leaf, and omitted from the back. It 
forms one of a collection of Peter Keer's maps of the counties of 
England and Wales, in the Manuscript Department of the British 
Museum, which were probably printed before those in Camden's 
Britannia, 1617. 



1620. 
Reprint of the 1617 map engraved by P. Keer. 

With the addition of the figure " 12 " in the bottom right-hand corner, 
and text in English at the back under the heading "Wiltshire Chapter 
XII." 

In ENGLAND, WALES, SCOTLAND, AND IRELAND, DESCRIBED 
AND ABRIDGED WITH ¥"= IIISTORIE RELATION OF THINGS 
WORTHY MEMORY FliOM A FARR LARGER VOULUME DONE BY 
JOHN SPEED. 

The title page of the British Museum copy has been cropped, and the 
date sacrificed, but it is believed to have been 1620. 

1626. 

Wiltshire. The scale of miles [I0 = f of an inch.] 4|iii. x 3fin. 

1)1 THE ABRIDGMENT OF CAMDEN'S BRITANIA. WITH THE 
MAPS OF THE SEVERALT. SHIRES OF ENGLAND AND WALES. 
PRINTED BY JOHN BILL .. . . 1626. obl. 12mo. 

A small map, very similar to the one by P. Keer, of 1617; but some 
of the names are spelt differently, and, owing to the engraving being of a 
ligliter character, it appears less crowded. Shows towns, villages, hills, 
and rivers. Top left-hand corner, a small cartouche, with title, merged 
into the border lines. Bottom left-hand corner, another cartouche encloses 
the scale. It has a plain double-lined border with the latitudes marked 
outside the left border, and the longitudes at the bottom. On the back 
a description, in I^nglisli, of Hampshire. 

1627. 

A reprint of J. Speeds map of 1611. 

/// rill'] TiiMATi;!': oi' nil'; kmi'iiM'; oi' cuK.vr i;i;irM\ . . . 
I'.v .iDiiN srKKh. i.DNhoN, I(;l!7. fol. 



218 Ma;ps of Wiltshire. 

1635. 

Wiltshire. [Engraved by Jacob van Langeren. Scale, about] 
40 miles to tlie inch.] fin. x lin. 

In A DIRECTION FOR THE ENGLISH TRAVILLER (PLATE 40) 
BY WHICH HE SHAL BE INABLED TO COAST ABOUT ALL ENGLAND 
AND WALES. AND ALSO TO KNOW HOW FARRE ANY MARKET 
OR NOTEABLE TOWNE IN ANY SHIRE LYETH ONE FROM ANOTHER, 
AND WHETHER THE SAME BE EAST, WEST, NORTH OR SOUTH 
FROM Y^ SHIRE TOWNE . . . ARE TO BE SOLD BY MATHEW 
SIMONS, AT THE GOLDEN LION IN DUCKE LAINE. A^. 1635. 
JACOB VAN LANGEREN SCULP. 

A " Thumb-nail " map. Shows the rivers, and the towns are indicated 
by capital letters. Lines, showing the points of the compass, radiate from 
the bottom of the map. Below the map, in the right-hand corner, a pair 
of open compasses stands upon a scale of 10 miles. Around the map : 
" Glocester North." " Hantshire & Bark. E." "Dorset & Hant. So." 
" Somersett West." 

Engraved on the bottom right-hand corner of a plate measuring 4in. 
X 4in. ; the other portions of which are occupied by a triangular table 
of distances. Above this table, twenty-six names of towns and villages, 
beginning with Salisbury. Down the left-hand side a list of twenty-six 
towns and villages, beginning with " Steple Ashto. NW." The plate is 
surrounded with a single border line. 

1636. 
A reprint of the previous map. 

In A DIRECTION FOR 'THE ENGLISH TRAVILLER, ETC. 1636. 

1637. 
A reprint of the 1607 map. 

In [CAMDEN'S BRITANNIA, TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH BY P. 
HOLLAND.] 1637. 
With the plate number " 6 " added in left-hand bottom corner. 

1642. 
A reprint of Saxton's map of 1576. 

In THE MAPS OF ALL THE SHIRES IN ENGLAND AND WALES 
... BY C. SAXTON, AND GRAVEN AT THE CHARGES OF A 
PRIVATE GENTLEMAN FOR THE PUBLICKE GOOD. NOW NEWLY I 
REVISED, AMENDED, AND REPRINTED ... BY WILLIAM WEB, 
AT THE GLOBE IN CORNHILL, 1645. 

With the date altered to 1642, and the Royal Arms changed to those j 
of Charles I., but with the original initials, " E. R.," retained. 



Bij T. Chuhh. 219 

1643. 
Wiltshire. [Scale about 20 miles to the inch.] l;J^in. x 1 Jin. 

In A DIRECTION FOR THE ENGLISH TKAVILLER . . . SOLD 
BY THOMAS JENNEIl, AT THE SOUTH ENTRANCIi: OF THE EXCHANGE, 

1643. 

An enlarged copy of the " Tlmnib-nail " map of 1635. Produced from 
the same plate, but after it had been hammered out and re- 
engraved. The map is drawn on twice the original scale, and conse- 
quently fills up the south-east angle of the plate. The rivers are shown 
and the towns and villages marked with their names in full. The scale 
and compasses have been placed on the bottom border line, near the 
centre of the plate. An additional line of figures lias been added to the 
table of distances. 

1646 
A reprint of Speed's map of 1611. 

Ill [PHILEMON Holland's latin translation of speed's 

THEATRE OF THE EMPIRE OF GREAT BRITAIN,] 1646. fol. 

With Latin text on the back. 

I have not seen this map, but it is probably an unaltered impression 
of the 1611 plate. A copy is in tlie Bodleian Library. 

Wiltonia sive comitatus Wiltoniensis. Anglis 
Wilshire. Amstelodanii. Apud Joanneni Jansson- 
ium. [Scale] Milliaria Anglica 6 [ = 2 inches.] IQJin.x 
15gin. 

In JOANNIS JAXSSONII NOVUS ATLAS, SIVE THEATUUM ORBIS 
TERRARUM . . . TOMUS QUARTUS. AMSTELODAMI. APUD 
JOANNEM JANSSONUJ^L 1646. fol. 

Shows towns, villages, liundreds, hills, enclosed parks, forests, rivers, 
and bridges. 

Top left-hand coi-ner, eight shields supported by a band of ribbon held 
by three cherubs. Bottom left-hand corner, two figures, one with a 
pair of compasses pointing to the scale which is enclosed in an oblong 
cartouche. Top right-hand corner, seven shields .supported by a band of 
ribbon lield by four cherubs. Bottom right-hand corner, against a i)ack- 
groimd of trees, a cartouche bearing the title, as given above, supported 
by labouring men and sheep. In the middle at the bottom, the imprint. 
On the back, in Latin, a description of Wiltshire. 

Jan Jansson was born at .\rniuMm c. ir)'.)6, ami died at Amsterdam in 
1()()4. 1I(» was a famous publisher of Anisierdani and the contemporary 



220 Ma'ps of Wiltshire. 

and rival of Jan Blaeu ; and was admitted to the Printers' Guild in 1618. 
He married the daughter of Jodocus Hondius, the partner of Gerard 
Mercator, and his son (Henry Hondius) subsequently succeeded to the 
business, which at his death was acquired by Jansson together with 
the plates of the atlas. 

In 1686 Jansson issued his Appendix to the atlas published by Mercator 
and Hondius, being the second volume of that atlas, and in 1642, the 
third volume. In 1646, he brought out the fourth volume, which con- 
tained the description of England, in Latin, by William Camden, 
accompanied by maps of the counties of England and Wales. Several 
editions weie subsequently issued, in French, Latin, and German. 

Another copy. 

In [jansson's atlas novus, fiiench edition,] 1646. 

With text in French on the back. 

A reprint of Peter Keer's map of 1620. 

In A PROSPECT OF THE MOST FAMOUS PARTS OF THE WORLD. 
LONDON, PRINTED BY M. F. FOR WILLIAM HUMBLE, AND ARE TO 
BE SOLD AT HIS SHOP IN POPE'S-HEAD PALACE, 1646. obl. 8vo. 

1648 

Wiltonia sive comitatus Wiltoniensis, An^lis 
Wilshire. Milliaria aiiglica 5 [ = 2 inches.] IQ^iii. x 16in. 

In TOONNEEL DES AERDRIICX OFTE NIEVWE ATLAS . . . DOOR 
WILHELM EN JOHANNEM BLAEU. AMSTERDAMI, APUD JOHANNEM 

GUiLJELMi F. BLAEU. ANO. 1648 — 50, fol. Vol. 4 beai's the follow- 
ing title : — VEIUDE STUCK DER AERDRYCKS-BESCHRYVING, WELCK 
VERY AT ENGLANDT. AMSTERDAMI, APUD JOANNEM BLAEU 1648. 

A beautifully-engraved map showing the towns, villages, hundreds, 
enclosed parks, hills, woods, rivers, and bridges. 

Top left-hand corner, a cartouche encloses the title, and is supported by- 
two figures, the whole resting upon two ornamental columns extending 
to the bottom of the map. Between the columns, fourteen coats of arms 
of the nobility of the county, two of the shields being blank. Top right- 
hand corner, the Royal Arms with pennons bearing the crosses of St. 
George and St. Andrew. Below the Royal Arms, a shield, with the cross 
of St. George, rests upon a cartouche which encloses an account of burials 
at Stonehenge. Bottom right-hd,nd corner, a small scalloped cartouche 
with the scale. Near by, a nobleman on horseback, a surveyor with a 
plane table, and a child with a measuring chain. The border is formed 
by a double line, a space of 3/16 of an inch, another double line, and 



By T. Chuhb. 221 

thicker line outside. Within the space in the border, " Septentrio." 
"Oriens." *' Meridies." "Occidens." At the back, a text in Dutch, and 
the numbers " 111 " and " 112." 

William Blaeu, a surveyor and publisher, was born at Alkmaer, in 
1571, and died at Amsterdam 21st October, 1688. 

In 1599, he was employed in maUiuf,' f,dobes. In 1628 he surveyed the 
entire coast between the Texel and the Meuse. In 1612 he set up 
as a printer and bookseller at Amsterdam. The business was carried on 
under the name of Guiliehnus Janssonius, with the result that he was 
often confounded with his rival, Jan Jansson, another famous publisher 
in the same city. 

His son, Johann Blaeu, was born at Amsterdam, 23rd September, 1596, 
and died there 28th December, 1673. He studied law while continuing 
the business of his father. After travelling in Italy he returned to 
Amsterdam and establislied a printing house, in which he was actively 
engaged as early as 1637. He soon made a great reputation and is even 
thought to have taken precedence of the rival establishment of Jansson. 
His first publication was the first and second volumes of his father's 
^i\Q.^:—Theatruvi Orhis Terrarum^ sive Atlas Novus . . . Amstelo- 
dami, apud Guilielmum Blaeu^ 1638. After his father's death, in 
conjunction with his brother Cornelius, whom he had taken into 
partnership in 1640, he brought out the third volume of the atlas, 
the remainder of the work being issued after the death of Cornelius in 
1642. His most finished and complete atlas was published in 1662, with 
Latin text, under the title of Atlas Majoi\ sive C osmograj^hia Blaviana, 
Qua Solum, Salum, Coehim, Accuratissime Describuntw\ It consists 
of eleven volumes, each of which has its own distinctive title page and 
the date 1662. In 1664 — 5 a French edition was published, and, in 1672, 
a Spanish edition. The last is now extremely rare. 

Blaeu had an extensive foreign business, and, in 1663, is known to have 
possessed a second establishment in Vienna. On the night of February 
22nd, 1672, his printing house at Amsterdam was destroyed by fire, and 
with it perished the greater part of his publications and nearly all the 
plates belonging to his geographical works. 

1649 
A reprint of Jausson s map of 1646. 

Ill NOVUS ATLAS DAS IST WKI/l'-lMvSClIKKl lU'XG, ETC. VIKII'IKII 
TIIKIl.. AMSTKLODA.MI AITD .lOANXK.M JANSSOXITM. 1()49. l\»l. 
With German text at ihe back. 

1652 
A reprint of Jansson's map of 1646 

/// N()r\KI, ATLAS (U' TIII'IATIIK l>r MoMil':, (( )M I'l; KN ANI' LKS 
I'AI'.LKS \- DKSi IMI'TIONS 1)K I'oLTKs LKS KKCloNS hi' MoM'K 



222 Maps of Wiltshire. 

UNIVERSEL, PREMIERE PARTIE. AMSTELODAMI, APUD JOANNEM 

JANSSONIUM, ANNO 1656. fol. Vol. 4. 

, Without text at back. 
In this volume the Latin title is retained, and the date given is 1652; 
but tome 1 is dated 1656, 

A copy is in the University Library, Cambridge. 

1657. 

A reprint of the 1643 edition of the map engraved 
by Jacob van Langeren, 1635. 

In A BOOK OF THE NAMES OF ALL PARISHES ... IN 
ENGLAND AND WALES , . . LONDON : PRINTED BY M. S. FOR 

THO. JENNER . . . 1657. With the title-page of the 1643 

edition following: — DIRECTION FOR the ENGLISH TRAVILLER, ETC. 
Larger paper was used for the printing of this map than was employed 
for the two earlier editions, the additional space, below the map, being 
occupied by three columns of names, which are continued on the back of 
-the map. The headline '* Wilt-shire," and the page number, 174, are 
out of register and come within the plate mark. 

1659. 
A reprint of Jansson's map of 1646. 

In [jAN jansson's NOVUS ATLAS, 1658 — 59.] Vol. 4, p. 113. 
With Latin text at the back. 

1662. 

A reprint of the 1657 edition of J. van Langeren's 
map of 1635. 

In A BOOK OF NAMES OF ALL PARISHES . . .IN 

ENGLAND AND WALES . . . LONDON . . . T. JENNER 

... 1662. 

This edition does not contain the title page of the 1643 issue. 

A reprint of Blaeu's map of 1648. With Latin text 
on the back. 

In GEOGRAPHIiE BLAVIAN^, VOLUMEN QUINTUM, QUO 
ANGLIA, QUiE EST EUROPE IJBER UNDECIMUS, CONTINETUK. 
AMSTELODAMI, LABORE & SUMPTIBUS JOANNIS BLAEU. 1662. foL 



By T. GhvM. 223 

Another reprint of Blaeu's map of 1648. With 
text, in Spanish, on the back. 

In NUEVO ATLAS DEL REYNO DE IXGLATEHKA. EN 
AMSTERDAM, EN LA OFFICINA BLAVIANA. AMSTERDAMI, APUD 
JOHANNEM BLAEU. 1662. fol. 

This edition of the atlas is extremely rare, the majority of the copies 
perishing in the fire which destroyed Blaeu's printing establishment in 
1672. 

According to Sir H. G. Fordham there is a French edition of vol. 4 of 
Blaeu's Atlas, dated 1662, in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, the maps 
being reprints of those of 1648, with French text on the back. 

1663 

A French edition of Geographise Blavianse. This 
is mentioned by Sir H. G. i^ordhani. 

Volume 5 contains the county maps of England which are reprints of 
those in the Theatrum of 1648, with French text on the back. 

1664 

A reprint of Blaeu's map of 1648. With text in 
IJutch at the back. 

In J. blaeu's gkooten atlas ofte averelt-beschryving 
I ... [AMSTERDAM, 1664 — 65.] Vol. 4. 

This volume has the same title-page as the Dutch edition of 1648, and 
bears the original date. 

1666. 
A reprint of Speeds map of 1611. 

In [a collection of speed's maps of the ENGLLSII COUNTIES.] 

Issued, probably, about 1666. Without title. 

Without text on back, with the imprint altered to "Thomas Bassett 
in Fleetstreet and Richard Chiswell in St. Paul's Churchyard." 

A reprint of P. Keer s map of 1620. 

/// FNiil.AM) . . . I»FSC1;I1;K1) and AP.lMlM.KD . . 
15V JOHN SPKKh . . . 16()(;. obi. Svo. 



224 Ma;ps of Wiltshire. 

1667 
A reprint of Blaeu's map of 1648. 

With French text on the back. 
In CINQUIEME VOLUME DE LA GEOGllAPHIE BLAVIANE, CON- 
TENANT l'ANGLETERKE . . . AMSTERDAM CHEZ JEAN BLAEU 

1667. With a second title-page dated 1662. 

1668 
A reprint of J. van Langeren's map of 1635. 

In A BOOK OF THE NAMES OF ALL PARISHES ... IN ENGLAND 
. . . LONDON ... J. JENNER, 1668. 

1671. 

A set of forty-one maps of the Counties of England, 
engraved by Wenceslaus Hollar, for R. Blome, 
variously dated from 1667—1671 

Mentioned by Sir H. G. Fordham as pubUshed in ENGLAND EXACTLY 
DESCRIBED OR A GUIDE TO TEAVELLERS. IN A COMPLEAT SETT 
OF MAPPS OF ALL THE COUNTY'S [sic] OF ENGLAND ; BEING A MAP 
FOR EACH COUNTY WHERE EVERY TOWN AND VILLAGE IN EACH 
COUNTY IS PERTICULERLY [sic] EXPRESSED WITH THE NAMES AND 
LIMITS OF EVERY HUNDRED, ETC. VERY USEFULL FOR ALL 
GENTLEMEN AND TRAVELLERS BEING MADE FITT FOR THE POCKETT ; 
PRINTED COLOURED AND SOLD BY THO. TAYLOR AT Y^ GOLDEN 
LYON IN FLEETSTREET, [1671]. 

1673. 

A Mapp of Wiltshire wjts [s^c] jts Hundreds. By Rjc, 
Blome, by his Matys command. A scale of 5 miles 

[=1-1- inches]. lOin. x 12Jiii. 

In BRITANNIA, OR, A GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE 
KINGDOMS OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, AND IRELAND . . . ILLUS- 
TRATED WITH A MAP OF EACH COUNTY OF ENGLAND, [by] RICHARD 
BLOME, LONDON, 1673. 



By T. C/mbb. 225 

A poorly drawn, and sketchy map, copied from Speed's map of 1611, 
Shows the towns, villages, enclosed parks, hills (j^reatly exaggerated), 
rivers, and some of the bridges. 

Top left-hand corner, some flowing drapery, suspended on three nails, 
forms a cartouche for the title, ; just below, a small compass rose. Bottom 
left-hand corner, dedication to, and arms of, the lit. Hon. William 
Viscount Brouncker. 

The bottom right-hand corner, the scales. 

Tlie border is formed by a single line, 

Richard Blome, a publisher and compiler of some celebrity, aided by 
subscriptions, issued many splendid works. Originally he was a ruler 
of paper, and afterwards a heraldic painter. His By^itannia is described 
by Bishop Nicholson as " a most entire piece of theft out of Camden and 
Speed," He died in 1705. 

1676 
A further reprint of Speed's map of 1611 as cor- 
rected in 1666 

In THE THEATRE OF THE EMPIKE OF GREAT BRITAIN . . . 

LONDON, 1676. fol. 

This edition may be identified by the text at the back, headed in plain 
capitals, " The Description of Wiltshire." 

A reprint of Peter Keer's Map of 1620. 

Ill AN ERITOME OF MR. JOHN SPEED'S THEATRE OF THE 
EMPIRE OF GIJEAT RIJITAIN, AND OF HIS PROSPECT OF THE MOST 
FAMOUS PARTS OF THE WORLD. LONDON, PRINTED FOR THO. 
BASSET AT THE GEORGE IN FLEET STREET, AND RIO. CHISWEL AT 
THE ROSE AND CROWN IN ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD, 1676. 

1677 
A reprint of Jacob van Langeren's triangular map 
of 1657. 

/yi A BOOK OF THE NAMES OF ALL PARISHES . . . IN ENGLAND 
. . . LONDON, PRINTED BY S. S. FOR JOHN GARRET . . . 1677. 

1680 
A reprint of Speed's map of 1611 as altered in 1666 

/// A ( 1)1.1. KCTluN ol' Till-: CorNTV MAI'S OF TIIK KINCDO.MK 
OK KN(i|..\ND .\ND I'K 1 N ( I IW l.I TV OF WALKS. I'.V ,lo|lN SKl.LKi; 
I LONDON KiSO]. 



226 Maps of Wiltshire. 

John Seller, Hydrographer to Charles II., was a publisher, and com- 
piler of maps and charts. For many years he lived at the Hermitage, 
Wapping, and also had a shop in Exchange Alley, Cornhill. 

His principal publications consisted of maritime atlases and charts. 
In 1671,he published the English Pilots and in 1675, the Atlas Maritimus- 
The charts in these works were taken, mainly, from Dutch publications, 
and some were actually printed from the original plates, with the Dutch 
title erased, and an English title, with Seller's name, substituted. On 
March 16th, 1671, privilege was granted by the King, for the protection 
of Seller's atlases and charts, for thirty years. 

The maps in the Atlas of the Counties of England and Wales, issued 
by Seller, are chiefly reprints from Bassett and Chiswell's edition of 
Speed's Iheatre of the Empire of Great Britain^ 1676. 

Wilt Sh. [Scale,] 10 miles [ = i-inch]. 2iin. x 2i in. 

In A POCKET BOOK OF ALL COUNTIES OF ENGLAND AND WALES 
. . . SOLD BY ROBERT MOEDEN, [LONDON, 1680.] 8vo. 

A small map showing the main roads with a double line, and the less 
important roads with a fine single line. The towns and rivers are given, 
but the scale is too small to allow of details. 

Top left-hand corner, a compass indicator. Bottom left-hand corner, 
an open pair of compasses standing upon the scale. 

The border is formed by a plain double line. Outside the border, at 

the top, '' Wilt Sh.," and, at the bottom, " Length— 52 ; Bredth — 38 ; 

, ^. , i^n Q r u ^^- from Lon.— 70, 83. 

Circumference— 140. Salisbury | Latitude-51. 4." 

Some of the maps in this atlas are embellished with portraits of notable 
people, at the right-hand top corner ; and others have large Koman 
numerals. But the map of Wiltshire in the British Museum has been 
badly cropped and it is impossible to distinguish its decorative numeral. 

1681. 

A Mapp of Wiltshire with its Hundreds. R. F[al- 
mer] sculp. A scale of 10 miles [=1| inches.] 9fin. x 
7|in. 

In speed's maps epitomized ; oe the maps of the counties 

OF ENGLAND. ALPHABETICALLY PLACED. LONDON, PRINTED ANNO 
DOM. 1681. 8vo. 

This is one of a set of forty-one county maps engraved by W. Hollar 
and E. Palmer for Eichard Blome (about 1667 to 1671), and, according 
to Sir H. G. Fordham, published in England exactly described or a 
Guide to Travellers . . . Printed coloured and sold by Tho. Taylor .^ 
etc. [1671]. 8vo. 



By T. OhuM. 227 

Shows towns, villages, hundreds (the names being indicated by num- 
bers), hills, enclosed parks, and rivers. 

Top left-hand corner, an ornamental cartouche enclosing the title. 
There is evidence of Kichard Blome's name having been erased from the 
title and replaced by a double twisted line. Below the title is a small 
compass rose, and a cartouclie with the arms of Thomas Thinn and dedi- 
cation " To the WorshipfuU Thonjas Thinn, of Long Leate, Esqr. This 
Mapp is D D by R. B." Bottom left-hand corner, "A Table of the 
Hundreds in Wilt Shire," numbered 1 to 29. 

Bight-hand bottom corner, the scale, and " B. P." sculp. 

R. B. no doubt stands for Richard Palmer, an engraver and stationer, 
who lived in Fullwood Rents, Holborn, and engraved maps for John 
Seller. His dates range from 1667 to 1705. 

1683 

Wiltonia sive comitatus Wilton iensis. Anglis 
Wilshire. Amstelodami apud P. Schenk et G. 
Valk. 19^5^11. X login. 

A reprint of Jansson's map of 1646 with Jansson's name expunged 
and that of " B. Schenk et G. Valk " substituted, and the addition of the 
words '' cu Priv." The back is plain. 

Pieter Schenk, an engraver and publisher, was born at Elberfeld in 
1645. He connnenced business as an engraver of topographical works, 
in which he was assisted by Gerard Valk, who afterwards taught him the 
art of mezzotint. In 1683-4, Schenk and Valk became partners, and it is 
difficult, after that, to distinguish their individual work. Augustus II., 
Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, appointed Schenk engraver to his 
court. Schenk died at Amsterdam about 1715. Schenk and Valk were 
succeeded by R. and J. Ottens. 

Strutt, in his Biograpldcal Dictionary of Engravers,^ London, 1785, 
vol. 2, page 373, under the heading "Gerard Valk," says : "He worked 
some time for David Loggan and he also assisted Peter Schenk in Pub- 
lishing the large Dutch Atlas in two volumes, 1683." Eol. 

This is probably the original from which was printed the Atlas 
Anglois, ou Description Generale de V Anyleterre ... a Zondres, 
chez Joseph Smith . . . 1724. Fol. 

I am unaware of the existence of a copy of this atlas of 1683. 

1689 

Wiltshire, wth Salisbury City & Stonelienge des- 
cribed Ao. 1689. 

/w TllK SHIRKS OF KNCl.ANlt .\NI) WALKS 1 )KS(i;i I'.KI > I;V (IIK-Ks- 
TOI'IIKI; SAXroN. I'.KINC TllK IlKS'l" AM) oK K : 1 \ A I, M A ITS ; Willi 
MANY AhDlTlDNSAMM ()i;|;KCTl<)NSr,\ rill! l.ll'LKA. SOl.D i;V IMlll.l II' 

vob. x.wvii. — NO. fxvi. g 



228 Maps of Wiltshire. 

LEA AT THE ATLAS AND HERCULES IN CHEAPSIDE, NEAR FEIDAY 
STREET, AND AT HIS SHOP IN WESTMINSTER HALL NEAR THE 
COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, ETC. [1690.] 

A reprint of Saxton's map of 1576, with considerable alterations, by- 
Philip Lea, who issued a reprint of Saxton's atlas, about 1690. The 
map of Wiltshire was probably published in 1667, as the date has been 
altered, there being evidence of the 8 having been 6 and the 9 a 7. 

The whole of the design on the left-hand side of the original plate, 
consisting of the Royal Arms, cartouche with the title, and the arms of 
Thomas Seaford, has been expunged, and replaced by plans of Salisbury 
and Stonehenge as given in Speed's map of 1611. Below these have 
been added six shields of the Earls of Wiltshire, and eight of the Earls 
of Salisbury. The scale and compasses, in the bottom left-hand corner, 
remain as in the original ; but there has been a slight alteration in the 
position of the word " of " and the letter " t " in Somerset. 

On the right-hand side, just above Hungerford, two shields of the 
Earls of Marlborough have been added, and, a little below these, are 
added the Royal Arms with the initials C. R, The latter addition 
explains the earlier date which was erased, and shows that the map was 
first issued in the time of Charles II. 

Bottom right-hand corner, two shields of the Earls of Clarendon 
have been added. 

In the map itself an important innovation was made by the introduction 
of the names and divisions of the hundreds, and the principal roads, 
which constitutes this the first map of the county showing roads. 

Philip Lea was a bookseller and publisher, from about 1680 to 1700, 
at the Atlas and Hercules in the Poultry, and at Westminster Hall. He 
published a large number of maps — mostly copies or reprints. On some 
of his maps he calls himself " Globe maker at the Atlas and Hercules in 
Cheapside." In 1703 his widow published A Netv Map of the French 
lines in the Province of Brahant. 

1695. 

Wiltshire. By Robt. Morden. Scale of miles, 6 
[=2 inches.] Sold by Able Swale, Awnsham & 
John Churchil. lejin. x 13|m. 

In CAMDEN'S BRITANNIA, NEWLY TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH 
... BY EDMUND GIBSON . . . LONDON, 1695. fol. 

A delicately engraved map, showing towns, villages, parks, hills, woods, 
hundreds, roads, rivers and bridges. 

The greater art of the plate on the left is bare, except for the names 
of the adjoining counties. Bottom left-hand corner, the imprint. Top 
right-hand corner, a cartouche with the title. Bottom right-hand corner,| 
the scale. 



By T. Ch'iihh. 229 

The border is of two plain lines with degrees and minutes. In top 
border the minutes of time are marked in Roman numerals — " V., VI., 
VIII., IX., X." (VII. is not given, as the map comes up into the margin 
where it should appear). In bottom border the longitude is marked. 

Gibson states in his preface that: " The maps are all new engrav'd 
either according to surveys never before publish'd, or according to such 
as have been made and printed since Saxton and Speed. Where actual 
surveys could be had, they were purchas'd at any rate; and for the rest, 
one of the best copies extant was sent to some of the most knowing 
gentlemen in each county, with a request to supply the defects, rectifie 
the positions, and correct the false spellings. And that nothing might 
be wanting to render them as complete and accurate as might be, this 
whole business was committed to Mr. Robert Morden, a person of Icnown 
abilities in these matters, who took care to revise them, to see the slips 
of the engraver mended, and the corrections return'd out of the several 
counties, duly inserted. Upon the whole, we need not scruple to affirm, 
that they are by nnich the fairest and most correct of any that have yet 
appear'd. . . ." 

The Robert Morden referred to by Gibson was a geographer, who began 
business in London as a map and globe maker, in 1668. He was in 
partnership with Thomas Cockerill, at the Atlas, in Cornhill, in 1688, and 
published a considerable number of maps and works on geograpliy, in- 
cluding Geor/raphy rectijied, 1688, Maps in Geography anatomized^ or, 
a complete Geographical Grammar, 1693, and The New Description and 
State of England, etc. He died in St. Christopher-le-Stocks, London, 
, 1703. 

I 

Wiltshire. English Miles, 10 [=2| inches.] 5|in. x 4|in. 

In ANGLIA CONTRACTA, OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE KINCJDOM 
OF ENGLAND ... BY JOHN SELLKTJ. [London.] 1695. 

A clearly engraved map showing the towns, villages, hills, rivers, and 
bridges. 

Top left-hand corner, a cartouche, with the title. Bottom right-hand 
corner, the scale of 10 miles. 

The design of the map reaches the top and bottom border ; but the 
sides are bare, with the exception of the names of the adjoining counties* 
The border is formed by three plain lines. 

1701 

Wiltshire. By R. Morden. Robert Spofforth, sculp. 

In CA.MDKN's r.ltlTANNIA ABRIDC'd . . . THE WHOLE CARK- 
FULLY PERFORM'D AND ILLUSTRATED WITH A150YE SIXTY MAPS 
EXACTLY KACRAVED . . . LONDON . . . I'RINTKl) FOR 
• lOSKlMl Wll.h, \r I'lIK KI.KrilANT, AT (IIARINC CROSS, 1701. 

U '1 



230 Maps of Wiltshire. 

A reprint of Seller's map of Wiltshire in Anglia Contracta, 1695. 

I have seen neither of these editions, but there are copies in the 
Manchester City Library. See description of copy issued in 1704, 

In the preface to the atlas it is stated that : " The maps are taken 
from the plates of the late Ingenious Mr. Seller, Hydrographer to King 
Charles II., King James II,, and his present Majesty," 

1703 
A farther reprint of Seller's Map of 1695. 

In THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND ... BY JOHN SELLER, HYDRO- 
GRAPHER TO HIS MAJESTY. THIRD EDITION. PRINTED FOR T = 
MARSHALL AT THE BIBLE IN GRACECHURCH STREET, 1703. 

1704. 
Wiltshire. By H. Morden. Hobert Spofiforth, sculp. 

6fin. X 8|in. 

In THE NEW DESCRIPTION ... OF ENGLAND CONTAINING THE 
MAPS OF THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND AND WALES, IN FIFTY-THREE 
COPPER PLATES, NEWLY DESIGN'd BY MR. ROBERT MORDEN. THE 
SECOND EDITION. LONDON, 1704. 8vo. 

A small map very similar to Morden's large map of 1695. Shows 
towns, villages, hills, parks, rivers, and bridges. The main roads are 
shown by a fine line, and the boundaries of the hundreds are indicated 
by numbers referring to the list of their twenty-nine names, which are 
given on the right-hand side of the lower half of the plate. 

Top left-hand corner, a cartouche with title. Bottom right-hand coiner 
beneath the names of the hundreds, the engraver's name. 

1708 

A reprint of Morden's small map published in 1701 
and reprinted in 1704. 

In FIFTY-SIX NEW AND ACCURATE MAPS OF GREAT BRITAIN, 
IRELAND, AND WALES . . . BEGUN BY MR. MORDEN : PERFECTED, 
CORRECTED AND ENLARG'd BY MR. MOLL. PRINTED FOR JOH^' 
NICHOLSON. LONDON, 1708. Obi. 8vo. 

The plate has been generally retouched, and the main roads re-engraved 
with a double line. A scale of five English miles has been added in the 
right-hand bottom corner, and some additional names given. ' 

1710 
A coloured reprint of J. Jansson's map of 1646. 

In ATLAS MAJOR . . . ex COLLECTIONE CAROLI ALLARP; 
AMSTELODAMI [1710]. | 



By 1\ GhvJjh. 231 

1713. 
A reprint of Speed's map of 1676. 

In ENGLAND FULLY DESCiaP.EI), IN A COMPLEAT SETT f)F MAPI'S 
OF YE county's OF ENGLAND AND WALES, WITH THEIPt LSLANDS, 
CONTAINING IN ALL 58 MAPPS, PRINTED AND SOLD BY HENRY 
OVERTON, AT YE WHITE HORSE WITHOUT NEWGATE LONDON, [1713]. 

The main roads are added and the names of Bassett and Chiswell re- 
placed by the inscription " Henry Overton, at the White Horse without 
Newgate, London." 

Sir H. G. Fordham notes this edition of the atlas and states that a 
copy was in the possession of Mr. Charles P. Ayres, of Watford, in 1906. 
See description of 1743 edition. 



\ 



1715 
re-issue of R. Morden's map of 1695. 

In [a COLLECTION OF MAPS OP TIIK COUNTIES OF ENGLAND AND 

WALKS, BY w. MORDEN.] Without title or date. 

Each map in the atlas is accompanied by a sheet of text, in manu- 
script, givinj^ the knights elected for each county in 1714/15, Probably 
issued in 1715. 

A.nother reprint of Blome's Map of 1681. 

/// ENGLAND EXACTLY DESCRIBED, OR, A GUIDE TO TRAVELLEKS. 
IN A COiMl^LEAT SETT OF MAPPS OF ALL THE COUNTY'S OF ENGLAND, 
ilElNG A MAP FOR EACH COUNTY WHERE EVERY TOWN & VILLAGE 
IN KAGII COUNTY IS PARTICULERLY EXPRESSED WITH I'llE NAMES 
AND LIMITS OF EVERY HUNDRED &C. VERY USEFULL FOR ALL 
GENTLEMEN & TRAVELLERS BEING MADE FITT FOR THE POCKETT. 
i'lnXTKI) COLOURED AND SOLD BY TIIO. TAYLOR AT YE GOLDEN LYON 
IN FLKKTSTRKKT, WHERE ARK SOLD ALL SORTS OF >L\PPS AND FINK 
FI.'KNCII, DITCH, AND ITALLVN I'L'INTS. 

The iuiiis ami dedicution to 'i'lioiims Tlihm are replaced b\' a neu* 
cartouche, and a new dedication : " To the Right Worshipful! Sr. Thomas 
Mompesson of 15alliampton, Ktiight. This IMapp is humbly dedicated by 
Riehard IJlome." " ;59 " in liLclil-haiul top corner has been added. 

Tli(» atlas is undatc^d ; l)ut> llu; map ot Scotland bears the date 1715. 

Sir 11. CJ. Fordham mentions a copy of this atlas under 1671. 

1716 

|L reprint of the Map of 1715. 

I 

/// KN(.I,AND KXAt \\.\ DLxLILKD . . . R.VT. TAVI.OK 1 7 1 H, 



232 Ma'ps of Wiltshire. 

1720. 

A Map of Wiltshire. [Scale,] English miles, 10 [^f in.]. 
4 Jill. X 4f in. 

hi BRITANNIA DEPICTA, OR OGILBY IMPROV'd : BEING A COKEECT 
COPPY OF MR. OGILBY'S ACTUAL SURVEY OF ALL YE DIRECT AND 
PRINCIPAL CROSS ROADS IN ENGLAND AND WALES ... BY JNO. 
OWEN . . . AND CORRECT MAPS OF ALL YE COUNTIES OF SOUTH 
BRITAIN ... BY EMAN. BOWEN, ENGRAVER. LONDON . . . 
SOLD BY T. BOWLES, 1720. 

A small and somewhat confused map, engraved in rather a sketchy 
manner-, occupying about two-thirds of an octavo sheet, and surmounted 
by an ornamental panel containing " The Eoad from London to Wey- 
mouth cum Dorset," etc. 

Shows towns, villages, hundreds, woods, hills, rivers, bridges, and the 
main roads. Top left-hand corner, the number " 134." Top right-hand 
corner, divided off with a double line, a description of the county. Bot- 
tom right-hand corner, a list of the hundreds, numbered 1 — 29, and by 
the side of the list, the scale printed horizontally. 

At the bottom, in the middle, enclosed with a single line, the title. 

The border is formed by two lines with ornamentation between. On 
the back, " 133," and maps of the roads, from Tittleshal to Newmarket, 
and Wells to Kenford, in four strips. 

1722. 
A reprint of Mordeu's largfe map of 1695. 

In [cAMDEN'S BRITTANNIA, TRANSLATED BY EDMUND GIBSON.] 
SECOND EDITION. LONDON, 1722. fol. 

1723. 

An edition of Moll's "A Sett of Fifty New and 
Correct Maps of England and Wales, 1723. 

This was advertised, December, 1910, in T. Thorpe's Catalogue. j 

1724. 
Wiltshire. By Her. Moll. [Scale,] 7 English milet 
[=liincli.] 1\iu. X lOiin. 

/7l A NEW DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND AND WALES . . . I> 
HERMAN MOLL, GEOGRAPHER. PRINTED BY H. MOLL . . . ^ 
BOWLES. C. RIVINGTON AND J. BOWLES, LONDON, 1724. j 



By T. ChaU). 233 

A plainly engraved map showing the towns, villages, hills, parks, 
woods, rivers, bridges, roads, and the boundaries of the hundreds with 
their names indicated by reference letters "A — Z " and " a — e." 

The detail of the map runs to the outer line of the border on the 
East and West. The border is formed by a single line outside with an 
inner double line marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. 

Top left-hand corner, a list of the hundreds. Bottom left-hand corner, 
the title. At bottom, in the middle, tlie scale. Outside the border, at 
the top, two views of Stonehenge. At the bottom, five illustrations of 
antiquities found in the county. 

A copy of H. Moll's map of 1724. 

Jn A SETT OF FIFTY NEW AND CORRECT ^lAPS OF ENGLAND AND 
WALES . . . BY HERMAN MOLL, CEOCRAPHER. LONDON: SOLD 
RY IT. :\IOLL . . . T. RONYLES . . . AND J. ROWLES . . . 

1724. 
JAnother edition of Jansson's map of 1646. 

Jib ATLAS ANGLOIS ... A LONDRES, CHEZ JOSEPH SMITH, 
MARCHAND LIRRAIRE A L' ENSEIGNE D'INIGO JONES, PROCHE 
EXETER EXCILVNGE DANS LE STRAND, 1724. fol. 

lm])rint altered to : — Amstelodami. Apud P. Schenk et G. Valk. cu. 
Priv. 

Tlie atlas was probably prepared from the one published by P. Schenk 
and G. Valk in 168.3. 



^ reprint of the 1720 map by E. Bowen. 

/,i BRITANNL\ DEPICTA . . . V^' 4''" EDITION. LONDON . . . 
SOLD iJY T. liOWLES . . . AND .L P.OWLES, 1724. 

Gough, in his liritish Topographi/^ vol. 1, p. 105, states tliat the fourth 
edition of Jiyttannid DeplcUi was published in 1731, but the above 
t^ntry would seem to show that a fourth edition was issued in 1724. 
There was a re-issue of the fourth edition in 1736 and again in 1739. 

I have not succeeded in finding copies of either the second or third 
edition of this work. 

1731. 
I. reprint of the 1708 edition of Morden s small 
map. iiiisT issiKi* IN 1701. 

/// \l\i;n.\ i;i;riANNL\, etc iiv imiuxlv-; cox. 17.'51. 



234 Maps of Wiltshire. 

1736. 
Another reprint of Bowen's map of 1720. 

In BEITANNIA DEPICTA ... BY J. OWEN . . . AND CORKECT 
MAPS BY E. BOWEN. THE FOUETH EDITION. 17^36. 
This appears to be the third issue of the fourth edition. 

1739 
A further reprint of Moll's small map of 1724. 

In A SETT OF FIFTY NEW AND COFJIECT MAPS OF ENGLAND BY 

H. MOLL. T. BOWLES, LONDON, 1739. 

The British Museum does not possess a copy of this edition ; but, in 
1909, one was in the possession of Mr, Henry Stevens, of 39, Great 
Russell Street, W.C. 

1742 
Wiltshire. T. Badeslade delin. W. H. Toms, sculp. 
English miles, 10 [= IJ in.]. 6in. x 5|in. Published 
by the Proprietors, W. H. Toms, Sept. 29, 1742. 

In CHOROGRAPHIA BRITANNI^E, OR, A NEW SET OF MAPS OF ALL 
THE COUNTIES IN ENGLAND AND WALES . . . THIS COLLECTION 
, . . WAS FIRST DRAWN AND COMPILED INTO A POCKET BOOK, BY 
ORDER AND FOR USE OF HIS LATE MAJESTY KING GEORGE I. FOR 
HIS INTENDED TOUR THRO. ENGLAND AND WALES. BY THOS, 
BADESLADE, SURVEYOR, AND ENGRAVED BY W. H. TOMS. 

A small map showing the towns, the more important villages, and the 
rivers. The latter are greatly exaggerated, and altogether out of pro- 
portion. The principal roads are shown by double lines. Salisbury Plain is 
marked as south of the Nadder. Clarendon Park is the only one shown. 
Asterisks are placed near some of the towns to indicate the number of 
members returned to Parliament. 

Top left-hand corner, a compass indicator. At bottom, in the middle, 
the scale. 

On the left-hand side, a section of the plate, divided from the map by 
a single line, contains a list of the principal towns with the dates of their I 
markets anu fairs. 

The space surrounding the map is stippled land shaded, which has the j 
effect of throwing it into relief. 

The border is formed by a plain double line. Outside of it, at the top, 
"Wilt Shire. West from London"; bottom left-hand corner, " T, 
Badeslade delin." Eight-hand corner, " W. H. Toms sculp " ; and in ; 
the middle, the imprint. 



By T. Chuhh. 235 

Unfortunately, the title-pages of the two copies of this work in the 
British Museum, have been cut so closely, that it is impossible to say 
whether they ever bore a date. Sir H. G. Fordham, however, posesses 
a copy in which the maps are dated 1741 ; but he is evidently of opinion 
that they were not published, collectively, till 1742. 

1743 
A reprint of Speed s map of 1676 as re issued by 
Henry Overton in 1713. 

Ill A SETT OF TlIK COUNTIES OF EN(}LAND AND WALES, AVITH 
THEIR ISLANDS, CONTAININC; KIKTY-KKHIT MAPS; EACH ON A 
SHEET OF ROYAL I'ARER. BY JOHN SPEED, REPRINTED IN THE 
YEAR 1743, AVITH ADDITIONS. SOLD EITHER IN COMPLEAT SETTS. 
ROUND OR SINGLE, EITHER COLOURED OR PLAIN, BY HENRY OVER- 
TON, AT THE AVIIITE HORSE AVITHOUT NEWGATE, LONDON, ETC. fol. 

The plate shows signs of much wear, the plan of Salisbury being little 
better than a snmdge. The border is formed by a single line. 

1744 
A map of Wiltshire. 

In GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF ENGLAND [BY BOBERT DODSLEY]. 
I have not seen a copy of this work ; but it is quoted by Sir H, G. 
Fordham, and also by Mr. William Harrison. 

1746. 

Wilt Shire. [Scale,] -10 English miles [=n in.]. 6|in. x 
7i:in. 

/// THE ACREEAF.LE HISTORIAN, OR THE COMPLEAT ENGLISH 
TILWELLEIJ . . . COMPILED BY SAMUELL SLMPSOX . . . 

riMNTKi) r.v i;. wai.kek, in fleet lane; and soij) \\\ the r.ooK- 

.SELEERS IN TO^YN AND COUNTRY, 1746. 

Shows towns, villages, hills, woods, inclosed parks, hundit'ds (with 
their nanl(^s), livers, bridges, and the main roads. 

Top left-hand corner, the arms of Wiltshire. Bottom left-hand coi nei-, 
tlie seale. On the East and W{;st in places, the detail reaches up to 
border. Top right-hand corner, the outlines of a j jition of Oxfoi ilshiio 
are shown. iJottom ri^dil-liand corner, Southampton W aler. .\t the top 
outside the bolder, ''Wilt Shire." 

The English Traveller [By John Rocque, 1 1 746. Svo. 

Mentioned l.v Sir 11. (1. I'or.llia m. 

The maps were repiinteil in .1. LoiMjiie's Sinnll ly,ili>li Af/ns, IT.'mJ 



236 Maps of Wiltshire. 

1747. 

A re-issue of Moll's set of County Maps, by Thomas 

Bowles, London, 1747. Noted by Sir H. G. Fordham. 

1748. 

A Correct Map of Wiltshire. [Scale,] 10 miles [=1 inch]. 
6|iii. X 5fin. 

In GEOGRAPHIA MAGN^ BRITANNIA OR, CORRECT MAPS OF ALL 
THE COUNTIES IN ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, AND WALES . . . EACH 
MAP EXPRESSING THE CITIES, BOROUGHS . . . TOWNS, VILLAGES, 
ROADS, AND RIVERS . . . PRINTED FOR T. OSBORNE, D. BROWN, J. 
HODGES, A. MILLER, J. ROBINSON, W. JOHNSON, P. DAVEY, AND B. 

LAW. OCTOBER 12th, 1748. 8vo. 

Shows towns, villages, hills, parks, rivers, and principal roads. 

Top left-hand corner, indicator showing the points of the compass. 
Kight-hand side, just below the middle of the map, a square ornamental 
frame, containing the title. Bottom right-hand corner, the scale of 10 
miles. The border consists of a single line with a double inner line 
marked ofi" into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. Outside 
the border, at the top right-hand corner, the number " 39." 

1749. 

A map of Wilt Shire. [Scale,] 12 English miles [=-| of an 
inch.]. b\m. x 5Jin. 

In THE SMALL ENGLISH ATLAS, BEING A NEW AND ACCURATE 
SETT OF MAPS OF ALL THE COUNTIES IN ENGLAND AND WALES. |f 
LONDON, PUBLISHED BY MESSRS. KITCHIN & JEFFERYS, 1749, ETC. 

Shows towns, villages, enclosed parks, rivers, bridges, and the main 
roads. The number of members returned to Parliament is indicated by 
asterisks. The shading around the plate has the curious effect of mak- 
ing the map look like an island. 

In middle, on the right-hand side, an indicator of the points of the 
compass. Bottom right-hand corner, the scale of twelve miles. The 
border is formed by a plain line, with a double inner line, marked off 
into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. Outside the border, 
at the top, the title. At bottom, three columns of information con- 
cerning the county towns. 

This map bears some resemblance to the one issued in Chorogvaphia 
Britannice by T. Badeslade, in 1742. 



I 



;;// T. Chuhh. 237 

1750. 
Wilt Sh, [Scale,] 10 miles [ = f of an incli.] 2|iM. x 3^iii. 

/;/. A BllIEF DESCIilPTlON OF P:NGLAN1) AND WAl.ES ; COXTAININO 
A PARTICULAR ACCOUNT OF EACH COUNTY . . . LONDON : HUNTED 
FOR n. TURPIN, NO. 104, 8T. .JOHN'S STRI^^I^Tf, WEST SMPi'IIFIELl', 

[1750]. ]2'"". 

A small sketchy map, the size of a playhig card. Shows towns, rivers, 
and two main roads, one from Salisbury to Exeter, the other from 
Marlborough to Bath. The border has a double line on the North, East; 
and South, and a single line on the West. Above the map is a space of 1 
of an inch, enclosin<^ the title, on the ri{,'ht of which is "VI " and, on 
the left, a small "6." At the hottom there is a similar space, in which 
the length, breadth, circumference, and latitude of the county are given ; 
and the distance from London to Salisbury. 

The set of maps to which this belongs appears to have been made for 
some kind of game. Some have large lioman numerals in the top 
right-hand corner, the numbers being duplicated in many instances ; 
iind others have medallions of men and women, in place of the numerals, 
and a crown in the centre of the plate. 

A Map of Wilt Shire West from I.ondon. Inscrib'd 
to the Zarl of Pembroke, Lord Iiieutenant of the 
County. . . By G-. Bickham according to act 
1750. 5Mn. X 8|in. 

J 11 TIJE RiaJ'lSIl MONARCHY : OR, A NEW CIIOROCRAPHICAL 
DESCRIPTION OF ALL THE DOMINIONS SURJECT TO THE KING OF 
(iREAT BKITAJN . . . THE AVHOLE ILLUSTRATED WITH SUITARLE 
MAPS . . . ENGPAVED BY GEORGE BICKHAM. PUBLISHED ACCORD- 
ING TO ACT OF PARLIAMENT, OCTOBER IsT, 1743, AND SOLD BY G. 
BICKHAM, ETC. A DESCIMP'I'ION OF THE SEVEPAL COUNTIES FN 
SOUTH r.HlTAlN ; CONTALMNG ENGLAND AND WALES. LONhON : 
SOU) HV G. I'.KKIIA.M, .ICNi;. . . . >LAi;< II l^Ol'Il , 1 7 "'0. ImiI. 

An idealized view lookinj^ west as if from some eminence on the hor- 
«lers of Hampsiiire. Showing the principal towns, rivers, and liills. 
in the forej,MOund, a river named " Ises River" is seen, crossed by a 
bridf^e of four arches with a tower at each end. A barge lies in tlu* 
stream, witli a boat betwt't'ii ii ami tlic shore. l'\)ur lij^nires are standiiii,' 
together, appar. iitly engaged in an altercation al)()Ut the loading, or un- 
loading, of tlw mncimndise. A siiort distance away two men (one sitting 
oil tile bank) ai-(; watchiii'' t he aUercut ion. 



238 Maps of Wiltshire, 

Top right-hand corner, " Before page 53." Bottom, below the view, 
the distances from Salisbury to Marlborough, Calne, Chippenham, 
Trowbridge, Bradford, and London ; and, below, " By G. Bickham, 
according to act 1750." 

1751. 
A reprint of the map by Kitchin & Jefferys, 1749. 

/^l THE SMALL ENGLISH ATLAS, LONDON, 1751. . . AND SOLD BY 
THOMAS JEFFERYS . . . MR. GEORGE FAULKNER . . . DUBLIN. 
A PARIS CHEZ LE SR. LE ROUGE, ETC. 

A copy of this Atlas is in the Library of the Koyal Geographical 
Society. 

Wiltshire, drawn from the best authorities and 
regulated by astron. observations by T. Kitchin, 
Geogr. British statute miles, 9 to a degree, 16 [= 

1| inches.] 6|in. x 8Jin. 

In THE LONDON MAGAZINE, OR, GENTLEMAN'S MONTHLY INTELLI- 
GENCER. VOL. XX., 1751. 

Shows towns, some of the villages, forests, parks, rivers, and the 
principal roads. Asterisks, placed near some of the towns, indicate the 
number of members returned to Parliament. 

Top left-hand corner, an ornamental cartouche, enclosing the title, with 
emblems of the industries of the county ; as a man carrying a flitch ©f 
bacon, etc. Bottom left-hand corner, the explanation of the signs on the 
map. Top right-hand corner, the arms of Salisbury, and, just below, a 
compass indicator. In the middle, at the bottom, the scale of sixteen 
miles. 

The border is formed by a single line with a double inside-line, 
marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude, A| 
bottom, between the border lines, " Longitude W. from London," Outside 
the border, at the top, " For the London Magazine," and at bottom^ 
" Printed for R. Baldwin, junr., at the Rose in Pater Noster Row," 

1752. 

Wilt Shire, drawn from an actual Survey, by R. Wj 
Seale. Univers. Mag. J. Hinton, Newgate Str^ 

[Scale,] English statute miles, 10 [ = lf inches.] T^in. x 8|in| 

In THE UNIVERSAL MAGAZINE OF KNOWLEDGE AND PLEASURl 
. . . PUBLISHED BY JOHN HINTON, AT THE KING's ARMS II 
NE^YGATE STREET, LONDON. VOL. XXXI. JULY, 1752. 



Bij T. Chuhh. 239 

A very clearly engraved map showing towns, villages, forests, enclosed 
parks, hills, hundreds (with names indicated by letters), rivers, bridges, 
and roads. The border is formed by a single line, with a double inner 
line marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. 

Top left-hand coi'iier, the arms of Salisbury. Bottom left-hand corner, 
the explanations, and scale of ten miles. Top right-hand corner, an 
ornamental cartouche with the title. Bottom half of the plate, on the 
right, a list of the hundreds, with reference letters A — H, Outside tlie 
border, at the top, " Longitude West of Greenwich," and, at the bottom, 
" Minutes and Seconds of time West from Greenwich." 

1753 
A reprint of Molls map of 1724. 

In moll's BRITISH ATLAS, OR POCKET MAPS OF ALL THE COUNTIES 
OF ENGLAND AND AN^ALES. 1753. 

A reprint of Mordens map of Wiltshire, 1695. 

Ill CAMDEN'S IUHTANNJA, TKANSLATED J3Y E. GIP>SON. THIPD 
EDITION. 1753. 

Wilt Shire. [Scale,] 8 English miles [-1 inch.] 6|in x 7fin. 

Ill THE SMALL BIHTISH ATLAS ; BEING A NE\Y SET OF MAPS OF 
ALL THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND AND WALES ; TO WHICH IS ADDED 
A GENERAL I\IAP WITH TABLES OF LENGTH BREADTH ... A 
PARLIAMENTARY MAP OF ENGLAND . . . LONDON : PUBLISHED 

1753 BY JOHN liOCQUE. (The title is also given in French). 

A sketchy sort of map, first issued in the English TvavelUr, 174»), 
showing towns, villages, hills, parks, roads and rivers. 

Top left-hand corner, an indicator of the points of the compass ; and 
immediately'^ below, the scale of 8 miles. The detail comes up to the 
border on the East, and, in bottom right-hand corner, a part of 
Southampton Water is shown. 

The bord<M' is formed by a single line. At the top, outside tlie border, 
" Wilt Shiie." 

1755 

An improved Map of Wiltshire, divided into its 
hundreds. Corrected from the best materials & 
illustrated with Historical extracts relative to 
its Natural products, Trade, manufacture and 



240 Maps of Wiltsldre. 

present state of the City of Salisbury and other 
Towns of Note. By Eman: Bowen, Geogr. to His 
Majesty. British statute miles 69 to a degree, 15 [--5^ 
inches]. 

To the Bright Honble Robert Sawyer Herbert, 
Lord Iiieutenant & Gustos Botulorum for the 
County of Wilts. This Map is humbly Dedicated 
by his Lordships most humble Servt. Eman: 
Bowen. Sold by J. Tinney at the Golden Lion 
in Fleet Street, London, 1755. 27Jin. x 21in. 

In [a collection of maps of the counties of ENGLAND AND 
WALES BY E. BOWEN, AVITHOUT TITLE ; IT IS NO DOUBT THE FIRST 
EDITION OF " THE LARGE ENGLISH ATLAS : OR, A NEW SET OF MAPS 
OF ALL THE COUNTIES IN ENGLAND AND WALES . . . BY EMANUEL 
BOWEN ... THOMAS KITCHIN, AND OTHERS. LONDON : PRINTED 
AND SOLD BY JOHN BOWLES, AT THE BLACK HORSE, IN CORNHILL, 
CARINGTON BOWLES, NEXT THE CHAPTER-HOUSE, IN ST. PAUL'S 
CHUHCH YARD ; AND ROBERT SAYER, AT THE BUCK, IN FLEET- 
STREET," 1758.] fol, 

Shows towns, with market towns indicated by means of signs, villages, 
churches with signs to show whether in charge of a Rector or Vicar, 
boundaries of the hundreds with their names in large type, rivers and 
bridges, the main roads with distances between market towns marked 
in miles, parks enclosed with palisades, and hills. 

Borough and market towns are distinguished by the engraving, and 
the number of members returned to Parliament is indicated by 
"^ asterisks. Religious Houses, Charity Schools and Post Stages are shown 
by signs, Salisbury Plain is marked in the extreme south of the county,, 
in the Hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, six miles south of Salisbury, 
and the part of the Plain lying north-west of Stonehenge is named 
" Black Heath." 

Top left-hand corner, the words " Part of Glocester Shire." Between 
"Part of " and " Glocester," a note referring to " Selbury Hill '' ; and, 
between " Glocester " and " Shire," two notes describing " Troubridge " 
and " Lavington West." Below these, descriptive notes of Marlborough 
and Ramsbury, followed by " Part of Somerset Shire " with a note in 
reference to Westbury interpolated between " Part of " and " Somerset '" y 
and, between " Somerset " and " Shire," a list of the Earls of Wilt- 
shire, and seats of the Nobility &c., the latter being continued below 
"Shire"; and followed by the titles of four baronets, and "Explana- 
tion." 



By T. Chuhb. 241 

Bottom left-hand corner, the dedication (given above) in a cartouche 
surmounted by the Arms of the Right Hon, llobert Sawyer Herbert. 
To the right of the dedication, an indicator of the points of the compass. 
Top right-hand corner, an ornamental cartouche with the title ; and 
below, descriptive notes of Wiltshire, Bratton Castle, Devizes, Salisbury 
and Stonehenge. The note on Devizes comes between " Part of " and 
" Hampshire." Bottom right-hand corner, the scale of fifteen miles. 

The border is formed by two single lines, the inner one being marked 
off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude ; the miimtes 
being numbered in fifths. In the margin, at the bottom, " Longitude 
from London." The imprint is given in the middle of the left-hand half 
of the plate, below the border. 



1759. 
Another reprint of Bowen's map of 1720. 

///. IJIUTANNIA DKPTCTA . . . BY .J. OWEN, AND COlMfECT 
MArS BY K. BO\VEX. THE FOURTH EDITION, 1759. 

Two notes are added at the back of the map in the right-hand margin 
of the plate. 

This appears to be the fourth issue of the fourth edition. 

Wilt Shire divided into its Hundreds, containing^ 
the City, Borough, and Market Towns, with 
the Roads and Distances. By Bman. Bowen, 
Geogr. to His Majesty. British Statute Miles, 

12 [ = 11 Indies.] 7 Jin. x 6Jin. 

In TIIK NATLIKAL HISTORY OF ENGLAND, OK, A DESCRIPTION OF 
EACH PARTICULAR COUNTY . . . BY BENJAMIN MARTIN. LONDON: 
PRINTED AND SOLD BY ^Y. O^VEN, TEMPLE BAR, AND BY ITIF 
AUTHOR, AT HIS HOUSE, IN FLEET STEEET, 1759. 

Sliovvs towns, villages, liills, parks, hundreds (indicated by letters), 
rivers, bridges, and main roads with distances marked. Salisbury Plain 
is shown south of the Wiley, and the Plain north of Stonehenge is named 
"Black Heath." The border is a plain single line with a double inner 
line marked off into degrees and minutes. Between the border linos, at 
the bottom," W. Long, from London." 

Top left-hand corner, a list of the hundieds with index letters .\ to Z 
and a to d. Bottom left-liand corner, snuill ornamental cartouche with 
the title ; and below this, the scale of twelve miles. Top right-hand conuT, 
an explanation of the signs used on the map. Bottom right-hand corniM-. 
a compass iiulicator. 



242 Maijs of Wiltshire. 

1760. 
A reprint of E. Bo wen's map of 1755. 

In THE LARGE ENGLISH ATLAS : OK,, A NEW SET OF MAPS OF 
ALL THE COUNTIES IN ENGLAND AND WALES . . . BY E. 
BOWEN. . . . THOMAS KITCHIN AND OTHERS. PRINTED AND 
SOLD BY T. BOWLES . . . JOHN BOWLES AND SON, JOHN 
TINNEY . . . AND ROBERT SAYER . . . LONDON, [1760]. 

fol. 

The imprint on the map is altered thus : " Printed for John Bowles 
and Son, in Cornhill ; J. Tinney at the Golden Lion, in Fleet Street ; T- 
Bowles, in St. Paul's Churchyard & Robert Sa^^er, in Fleet Street." 

New and accurate maps of the Counties of England 
and Wales, by John Gibson. 

Sir H. G. Fordham, under date of 1760, states that there is a copy in the 
Bodleian Library. 

1762 
A reprint of the map of Wiltshire of 1753- 

In THE SMALL BRITISH ATLAS ... BY JOHN ROCQUE. 1762. 

An improved Map of Wilt Shire, divided into Hun- 
dreds, drawn from the best authorities; illus- 
trated with historical extracts, relative to its 
Natural produce, Trade, Manufactures, & 
Present State of the City of Salisbury and the 
Principal Towns; Describing also the Church 
Iiivings &c. By £man. Eowen, Geographer to 
His late Majesty. British Statute Miles 69 to 
a Degree, 16 [= 4 inches]. Printed for R. Sayer 
and J. Ryall in Fleet Street, T. Kitchin, on 
Holborn Hill, H. Overton without Newgate, 
Carrington Bowles, in St. Paul's Church Yard, 
J, Bowles and H. Parker in CornhilL 20|in. 
X 16Jin. 

In THE ROYAL ENGLISH ATLAS ; BEING A NEW AND ACCURATE 
SET OF MAPS OF ALL THE COUNTIES OF SOUTH BRITAIN ... BY 
EMANUEL BOWEN, GEOGRAPHER TO HIS LATE MAJESTY, THOMAS 
KITCHIN. — AND OTHERS. LONDON. PRINTED FOR THOMAS 



By T. Chubb. 243 

KITCHIN . . . ROBERT SAYER . . . CARINGTON BOWLES 
. . . HENRY OVERTON . . . HENRY PARKER, JOHN BOWLES 
. . . AND JOHN RYALL. [1762]. fol. 

A reduction of Bowen's map of 1655. On the left-hand side of the 
plate is "Part of Gloucester Shire," "Part of Somerset Shire"; and 
between these sentences, descriptive notes of Wiltshire, Selbury Hill, 
Marlborough, Ramsbury, Castlecombe, Troubridge, Lavington West, 
Westbury, Stonehenge, Salisbury, and Bratton Castle. In top right- 
hand corner, a cartouche with the title ; and below, a list of the Seats of 
the Nobility, with a note stating that Font Hill was burnt down in Feb. 
1755, but since rebuilt ; this is followed by " Part of Hampshire," with a 
note on Devizes between "Part of" and "Hampshire," a list of the 
Earls of Wiltshire, and a view of Salisbury Cathedral with a description 
of the diocese. 

At the top, in the middle, the scale of 16 miles. At the bottom, outside 
the border, the imprint. The border is the same as that in the 1755 map. 



1763. 

A reprint of the 1760 edition of Bowen's map of 
1755. 

In THE LARGE ENGLISH ATLAS ... BY E. BOWEN . . . 
LONDON. PRINTED AND SOLD BY JOHN BOWLES, CARINGTON 
BOWLES . . . ROBERT SAYER. [1763]. fol. 

" I Tinney at the Golden Lion in Fleet Street " is erased, leaving a 
blank space in the imprint. 

1764. 

A New Map of Wiltshire. Drawn from the best 
Authorities; toy Thomas Kitchin Geogr., En- 
graver to H.R.H. the Duke of York. British 
Statute Miles 69 to a degree, 10 [ = U inchet^] 
V^in. X lOin. 

/// KN(;i,ANn ILLUSTKATKJ), OK, A COMI'KNniUM OK THK NATURAL 
IIISTOKV, CKOCKAPHY, TOPOc IRAPIIY, AND ANTKtriTlKS . . . OK 
E.NC;i,AM-» AM) WALKS. WITH MAI'S OK TIllC SEVEKAL COl'NTIES 
AND EN(iHAVlN(;S OK MANY KKMAINS OK ANTI(.,»U ITI KS. K'l'C 
VOL. M. LONDON: KKINI'KD KOK U. AND .1. hoDSLKV, IN I'AI.L- 
MALL, 17G-1-. 8V0. 
VOL. .XX.WIL — NO. ( XVK K 



244 Maps of Wiltshire. 

Top left-hand corner, a compass indicator. Bottom left-hand corner, 
"Remarks." 'J'op right-hand corner, an ornamental cartouche, with the 
title. Bottom right-hand corner, scale of ten miles, and, immediately 
below, " Longt. West from London." 

The detail on all sides comes nearly to the border, which is formed 
by a single line, with a double inner line, marked off into degrees and 
minutes of latitude and longitude. 



A further reprint of E. Bowen's map of 1720. 

In BRITANNIA DEPICTA, OR, OGILBY IMPROV'd ... BY 
JOHN OWEN . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR CARINGTON BOWLES, 
IN ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD. 1764. 

The Small British Atlas, by J. Rocque. 

Under date of 1764, Sir H. G. Fordham gives an edition of this atlas. 

1766. 

A Modern Map of Wilt Shire, Drawn from the 
latest Surveys: Corrected &; Improved toy the 
toest Authorities. W. Fowler sculpt. British 
Miles 69 to a degree, 10 [=1 J inch]. Printed for 
Rotoert Sayer in Fleet Street & Carington Bowles 
in St. Paul's Church Yard. 7Jin. x lOin. 

In ELLIS'S ENGLISH ATLAS : OR, A COMPLETE CHOROGRAPHY OF 
ENGLAND AND WALES : IN FIFTY MAPS, CONTAINING MORE PAR- 
TICULARS THAN ANY OTHER COLLECTION OF THE SAME KIND. 
THE WHOLE CALCULATED FOR THE USE OF TRAVELLERS,ACADEMIES, 
AND OF ALL THOSE WHO DESIRE TO IMPROVE IN THE KNOWLEDGE 
OF THEIR COUNTRY. FROM THE LATEST SURVEYS OF THE SEVERAL 
COUNTIES ; ENGRAVED BY, AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF, J. ELLIS. 
PRINTED FOR CARINGTON BOWLES, NEXT THE CHAPTER-HOUSE, 
ST. PAUL'S churchyard; and ROBERT SAYER, AT THE GOLDEN 
BUCK, NEAR SERJEANT'S INN, IN FLEET STREET, 1766. 4to, 

This map bears a remarkable resemblance to the map of Wiltshire, by 
T. Kitchin, in England Illustrated . . . London. Printed for 
R, Dodsley, 1764^ but close examination shows that it is not the same 
map. 



By T. Chuhh. 245 

Top left-hand corner, a compass indicator. Bottom left-hand corner, 
" Remarks," Top right-hand corner, cartouche with the title. Bottom 
right-hand corner, the scale of ten miles, and just below, "Longt. from 
London." This is all practically the same as Kitchin's map. At the 
bottom, in the middle, the engraver's name. Outside the border, at the 
top right-hand corner, the number "45," and at the bottom, the imprint. 

Wiltshire. Size of page, 4 J in. x Vfin. 

Ith [a collection of maps of the counties of ENGLAND, 

1766.] 

A small clearly engraved map ; but witli very little detail, and only 
the principal places named. The chief feature of the map is the 
rivers, which are clearly shown and named. The " Chicklade Hills" 
are shown, but no others. Salisbury Plain is marked as extending to the 
southern borders of the county. The county boundary is shown by a 
fine dotted line. There is no border line ; but, surrounding the map, are 
the names of the neighbouring counties of Gloucester, Berkshire, Hamp- 
shire, Dorsetshire, and Somerset. 

1767 

Wiltshire, Divided into its Hundreds ; containing 
the City, Borough, and Market Towns, with 
concise Extracts relative to their Trade and 
Manufactures, Describing, also, the Church 

I Livings, with improvements not inserted in any 
other Half-sheet County Maps Extant. By Thos. 
Bowen. Printed for Thos. Kitchin at No. 59, 
Holborn Hill, London, [1767]. 8Mn. x 12iin. 

Li ATf.AS ANGLICANUS, OR A COMPLETE SETT OF MAPS OF 
TlIK COUNTIES OF SOUTH BRITAIN; DIVIDED INTO TIIPHR ItE- 
SPECTIVE HUNDREDS . . . WITH VAIUOUS IMPROVEMENTS, NOT 
INSERTKI) IN ANY OTHER SETT OF HALF-SHEET MAPS EXTANT . .. . 
nV THE LATE EMANUEL BOWEN, GEOGRAPHER TO HLS MA.IES'l'V 
(JEORGE 11. AM) 'i'lIOMAS P.OWKN. PRINTED KOK' T. KITCHIN, NO. 
59, HOLr.OUN HILL. t'ol. 

This map resembles tlie larf?e map of Wiltshire by E. l^owen, 1755. 
Shows towns, villap;es, hundreds, parks, rivers, bridfj^es, and main roads. 
Salisbury Plain is shown as bein^' to tho south of Salisbury, in the iumdrt'd 
of Cawden and Cadworth. 

Top left-hand corner, the explanation of tlic sit,'ns used on llu' nuip. 
and l)ulow, a note referring' to Hamsbury. The detail comes nearly 



246 Ma'ps of Wiltshire. 

to the border at the sides. Bottom left-hand corner, a compass rose. 
At top, in the middle, a descriptive note of the county. Top right-hand 
corner, an ornamental cartouche enclosing the title ; and below, two notes 
referring to Marlborough and Trowbridge. On the right-hand side, in 
the middle, the map projects over the first border line. 

In the lower half of the plate, on the right-hand side, two notes re- 
ferring to Devizes and Stonehenge. Bottom right-hand corner, the scale 
of twelve miles. 

The border is formed by a single line, with a double inner line, marked 
off into degrees and minutes. Between the border lines, at the bottom, 
" W. Long : from London," 

The plate is crossed by lines of latitude and longitude 5' apart, broken 
at intervals by the geography. Outside the border, at the bottom, the 
imprint. 

The atlas is not dated ; but as E. Bowen is described, in the title, as 
"The late," it could not have been issued before 1767, the year of his 
death. 



1768. 

A reprint of the map of Wiltshire, by W. Powler, 
1766 

1% ELLIS'S ENGLISH ATLAS . . . PRINTED FOR ROBERT 
SAYER, MAP AND PRINT-SELLER, NO. 53, FLEET STREET. THOMAS 
JEFFERYS, GEOGRAPHER TO HIS MAJESTY, THE CORNER OF ST. 
martin's lane, CHARING CROSS : A. DURY, IN DUKE's COURT 

ST. martin's lane . . . 1768. 4to. 



1769. 
Another edition of T. Kitchin's Map of 1751. 

In ENGLAND DISPLAYED, BEING A NEW, COMPLETE, AND ACCURATE 
SURVEY AND DESCRIPTION OF THE KINGDOM OF ENGLAND . . . 
BY A SOCIETY OF GENTLEMEN . . . ENGLAND REVISED . . . 
BY P. RUSSELL. ESQR., AND WALES, BY MR. OWEN PRICE. LONDON : 
PRINTED FOR THE AUTHORS, BY ALLARD AND BROWNE . . . AND 
SOLD BY S. BLADON . . . T, EVANS ... AND J. COOTE, 
IN PATER NOSTER ROW; W. DOMVILLE, AND F. BLYTHE, AT 
THE ROYAL EXCHANGE, 1769. fol. 

A somewhat yvom impression of the map which appeared in the 
London Magazine, 1751, with the imprint of R. Baldwin and "For 
the London Magazine " erased. 



By T. Chnhh. 247 

1772. 
A further reprint of Morden's map of 1695. 

In Camden's Britannia . . . by e. gibsox. loxdon, 1772. 
fol. 

1773. 
A second reprint of the map in Ellis's Atlas, 1766. 

In ELLLS'S ENGLLSH ATLAS . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR 
IIOBERT SAYER, MAP AND PRINTSELLEIi, NO. 53 IN FLEET STREET ; 
AND A'l' THE MAP AND PRINT SIIOl' NO. 92, UNDER THE ROYAL 
EXCHANCJE, COKNIIILL, 1773. 4to. 

A Topographical Map of Wiltshire, on a scale of 
2 inches to a mile from an Actual Survey, by 
John Andrews & Andrew Dury in the year 
1773. To Noblemen, Gentlemen, Clergy, Free- 
holders of the County of Wilts. This map is 
inscribed by their most obedient and devoted 
Servants John Andrews & Andrew Dury. Pub- 
lished according to Act of Parliament Augt. 
1773, & sold by A. Dury in Duke's Court, St. 
Martin's Lane, & Jno. Andrews, No. 5, Bridge 
Court, Westminster Bridge. N.B. The said 
Jno. Andrews Surveys & neatly Draws Noble- 
mens & Gentlemens Estates, Plans, etc., on 
moderate terms. Eighteen sheets, each nieasiiring 24|in. 
X 18In., not inchiding the border. When mounted as a whole, 
Gft. 3in. X 8ft. lliin., including the border. 

An index nni}) was furnished bearing the title : A Map of 
Wiltshire (Taken from Actual Survey), being 
the Index Map to the large one. N.B. This 
map is divided into 18 Squares, each containing 
one sheet of the large map ... A scale of 
British Statute miles .10 [ "', nKhes] 
Published 1st Jany 1773, by J. Andrews 

& A. Dury, in Duke's Court, St. Martin s Lane, 
London. 



248 Ma;ps of Wiltshire. 

Andrews' map is the finest map of the county produced before the 
Ordnance Survey. It is on the same scale as the first Ordnance Survey, 
which was made on the scale of two inches to the mile ; but reduced for 
publication to one inch to the mile. 

Andrews' map shows towns, villages, hamlets, hundreds, hills (which 
are named), barrows, downs, parks, ponds, wells, mansions (with names 
of occupiers), rivers, mills, and bridges. All the roads are clearly shown 
with the direction posts at the cross roads. The distances from London 
on the main roads are given, and also from town to town, both on the 
main and cross-roads. 

Top left-hand corner and the western side of the plate are bare, except 
for the names of the adjoining counties. 

Bottom left-hand corner an elaborately engraved symbolical picture 
showing the produce of the county. An oak tree forms the background 
of the picture, in the front of which a child is milking a cow. The forepart 
of the cow is hidden by a female figure holding, in her left hand, an oval 
shield containing the dedication given above, and in her right hand a 
spear. The foreground on the left is occupied by a sheaf of wheat, and 
on the right by three sheep, a stag, and a bale of cloth. Below the 
picture, " G. B. Cipriani inv. J. Caldwell sculp." A little to the right, the 
scale of four miles. Top right-hand corner, the title plainly engraved in 
six lines including the scale. Immediately below the title, a note referring 
to the hundreds followed by a " List of Subscribers " printed in double 
column. 

The eastern margin of the plate is bare except for the names of the 
adjoining counties. 

On the middle bottom sheet. No. 17, a compass indicator, formed by 
two crossed lines, the northern point having an arrow-head, the others, 
E., S., W. 

The border is formed by a thickly-engraved line, with double lines 
within, marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. 
Between the border lines on Sheet 18, at the bottom, "Minutes of Longitude 
East from the Meridian of the Cathedral of Salisbury, " Below the border, 
in the left-hand corner, " J. Andrews, sculp." The imprint is given below 
the border on Sheet 17. 

John Andrews, geographer, surveyor, engraver, and map-seller, was 
born in 1736, and died at Kennington, Surrey, in 1809. As a business 
man he is said to have been a failure, and this is rather borne out by the 
numerous addresses from which his various ventures emanated. 

In addition to his map of Wiltshire, he surveyed the county of Hertford, 
assisted by Andrew Dury and William Herbert. The work was published 
by zV, Dury and W. Herbert in 1766. 

In 1797 Andrews published Hintorical Atlas of England : Physical^ 
Political, Astronomical, Civil, and Ecclesiastical, . . . from the Deluge 
to the present time . . . London : Printed by J. Smeeton : sold hy the 
Author No. 211, Facing Air Street, Picadilly . . . 1797. 

There are twelve maps in this work, which was, apparently, never 
completed. The maps were " drawn and engraved by J. Andrews," 



By T. Chnhh. 249 

Andrews' assistant, Andrew Dury, was a publisher and bookseller at 
Duke's Court, St. Martin's Lane, from which address he issued maps 
from about 1732 to 1777. He appears to have been a surveyor as well 
as a bookseller, as he assisted John Andrews in surveying Wiltshire, 
Hertfordshire, Kent, and the Environs of London. 

In 1769 A. Dury and W. Herbert published a map of Kent made 
from a survey by J. Andrews, assisted by A. Dury and W. Herbert, A 
second edition was issued in 1780. In 1771 Andrews issued A Collec- 
tion of the Flans of the Cajntal Cities of Eur O'pe . . . in 2 volumes 
hy Jno. Andrews, Surveyor. The forty-two plates in this work were 
engraved by Andrews, and sold by him at No. 5, The Fish Market, 
Westminster Bridge. 

In 1776 appeared A Map of the Country sixty five miles round London 
fro7)i actual Sic7'vey hy J. Andreivs and A Dury. [Scale, 1 1 inch to the 
mile.] 20 Sh. It was published by J. Stoke : London, 20th June, 1776 ; 
and a second edition was issued by John Stockdale in 1809. 

Andrews published the four middle sheets of his map of the Environs 
of London under the title :—A Neiv and Accurate Map of the Country 
twenty five miles round London . . . hy John Andreivs . . . 
Se'ptemher 10th, 1777. Sold hy J. Andreivs, at Mr. Blissefs, No. 29, 
Long Acre, etc. 

Wiltshire. English miles 11 [ = 1J inch]. 5fin. x 4fin. 

In THE ANTIQUITIES OF ENGLAND AND AVALES, BY FRANCIS 
GROSE, VOL. IV. LONDON: PRINTED FOR S. HOOPER, NO. 25, 
LUDGATE HILL, 1776. 4to. 

Another edition of John Seller's small map of 1695, with the original 
cartouche and title replaced by the name "Wiltshire" surrounded by a 
plain double line, and a new scale showing eleven miles instead of ten. 

This edition occupies the upper half of a quarto page. On the lower 
half is a description ot " Wiltshire," concluded on the next page. 

1777. 
A reissue of Boweii's large map of 1755. 

hi TIIK LAU(;K KNGLISH ATLAS. 1>K1XTKD AND SOLD BY 

KOIJKKT SAYK1{, MAP AND PRINT-SKLLEi;, AT NO. 53, IN FLEET 
STREET, [1777]. fol. 

This edition is noted by Sir II. G. Fordhani. 

Another reprint of the map engraved by W. Fowler, 
1766. 

/// KLLIS'S KXCIJSII ATI, AS . . . LONDON. rillMKh lOi; 
K. SAYKi; AND .1. KKN N KT'I', MAI', CIIAKI', AM» TKINl' SKLLKI.', 
NO. Oo, KLKET STKEKT. 1777. 4l(). 



250 Maps of Wiltshire. 

A reprint of T. Bowen's map of 1767. 

In ATLAS ANGLICANUS. 1777. fol. 

1784. 

A New map of Wiltshire. Drawn from the best 
Authorities. British statute miles, 15 [= If inches]. 
Published by Alexr. Hogg, at the King's Arms, 
No. 16, Paternoster Row. 4iin. x 6Jin. 

In THE NEW BRITISH TRAVELLER, OR, A COMPLETE MODERN 
UNIVERSAL DISPLAY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND . . 
^GEORGE AUGUSTUS WALPOOLE . . . LONDON, PRINTED FOR 
ALEX. HOGG, AT THE KING's ARMS, NO. 16, PATERNOSTER ROW. 

A small map occupying the lower left-hand corner of a plate, 8|in. X 
13jin. in size, which also contains maps of the counties of Huntingdon, 
Warwick, and Worcester. 

Top of the plate, outside the border, " Engraved for Walpoole's New 
and Complete British Traveller," and at the bottom, the imprint. 

Shows towns, principal villages, hills, woods, rivers, and main roads, 
with Salisbury Plain extending north and south of Salisbury. 

Top left-hand corner, the arms of Wiltshire. Bottom left-hand corner, 
the scale of fifteen miles. At the top, in the centre, " Longt. W. from 
London." Top right-hand corner, the title. A little below the middle 
on the right-hand side, a small circular compass indicator, with a cross 
on the east. Bottom right-hand corner, " Remarks " (being an explanation 
of signs used on the map). The border is formed by a plain line, with a 
doable inner line marked ofE into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude, and is broken by the detail on both sides. 

1785. 

Bowles's New Medium Map of Wilt Shire, divided 
into its Hundreds ; Exhibiting the Heads, Towns, 
and Villages, with their distances from London, 
Church Livings, Seats of the Nobility, and His- 
torical Remarks. London : Printed for the Pro- 
prietor, Carington Bowles, No. 69, in St. Pauls] 
Church Yard. Published as the Act directs, 3{ 
Jan., 1785. 8iin. xl2Jm. 

In BOWLESES NEW MEDIUM ENGLISH ATLAS ; OR, COMPLETE SET| 
OF MAPS OF THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND AND WALES . . 



By T. Chuhh. 251 

PllINTED FOR THE PKOPIUETOR CARINGTON BOWLES, AT HIS MAP 
AND PRINT WAREHOUSE, NO. 69, IN ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD, 1785. 

4to. 

Another edition of the map of Wiltshire by Thomas T3owen, 1767, with 
the above title enclosed in a single-lined oval, substituted for the original 
title and cartouche and with Kitchin's imprint replaced by " Published as 
the Act directs B Jan., 1785." 

Sir H. G. Fordham states that this Atlas was probably re-issued by 
Bowles and Carver, as he had seen a map of Hertfordshire bearing their 
imprint at the Hertfordshire County Museum. 

A re issue of E. Bowen's large map of 1755 

In THE lar(;e English atlas ... by emanuel bowen . . . 

T. KITCHIN AND OTHERS. LONDON : PRINTED AND SOLD BY ROBERT 
WILKINSON, AT NO. 58, IN CORNHILL, SUCCESSOR TO MR. JOHN 
BOWLES, DECEASED, [1785]. fol. 

The imprint on the map is altered to " Carington Bowles." 

1786 

A reprint of T. Kitchin's map of 1751, as re-issued 
in 1769. 

In HISTORICAL DESCRIPTION OF NEW AND ELEGANT PICTURESQUE 
VIEWS OF THE ANTIQUITIES OF ENCiLAND AND WALES , . . [BY] 
HENRY BOS WELL . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR ALEX. HOGG, AT 
THE king's ARMS, NO. 16, PATERNOSTER-ROW, ETC. [1786.] 

1787. 

A reprint of Kitchin s map of 1749. 

Ill .VN ENGLISH ATLAS OR A CONCISE VIEW OF ENGLAND & WALES : 
DIVIDED INTO COUNTIES, AND ITS SUBDIVISIONS INTO HUNDREDS 
. . . ON FIFTY-TWO COPPER PLATES. PUBLISHED AS THE ACT 
DIKECTS 1 AUGT., 1787. LONDON : PRINTED FOR ROBT. SAYER, NO. 
58, IN FLEET STREET. 4^. 

The only copy I know, of this edition, is in the University Library, 
Canibrid^'e. 

Wiltshire. By John Gary, Engraver. Scale of 
statute miles . . 10 [ Ijinclus]. London: 
Published as the Act Directs, September 1st, 
1787, by J. Gary, Engraver, Map & Printseller, 
No. 188 the corner of Arundel Street, Strand. 
Sliii X ll)|iii. 

"1.. XXXVn. — NO. I XVI. s 



252 Maps of Wiltshire. 

In Gary's new and correct English atlas ; being a new 

SET OF COUNTY MAPS FROM ACTUAL SURVEYS , . . PRINTED FOR 
JOHN GARY, ENGRAVER, MAP AND PRINTSELLER, THE CORNER OF 
ARUNDEL STREET, STRAND. PUBLISHED AS THE ACT DIRECTS 

SEPTR- 1, 1787. 40. 

A clearly engraved map, showing towns, villages, hamlets, camps, 
woods, parks, rivers, and all the roads with distances marked, and 
Salisbury Plain shown south as well as north of Salisbury. 

Top left-hand corner, a finely engraved star-indicator of the points of 
the compass, crossed horizontally by an oblong shaded panel bearing the 
title " Wiltshire " ; and, curved round the bottom of the star, " By John 
Gary, Engraver." Immediately below, a little to the right, the scale of 
10 miles. The plate, around the map, is bare except for the names of 
the adjoining counties. The border is formed by a thick and a thin line, 
close together, and a double inner line marked off into degrees and 
minutes of latitude and longitude. 

Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude West from 
London." Outside the border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

A page of descriptive text accompanies the map. 

John Gary, an engraver, and map and print seller, commenced business 
at 188, Strand, at the corner of Arundell Street, where he remained till 
1791, when he removed to 181, Strand. From 1824 he gives his address 
as 86, St. James's Street — Near the Palace. 

Gary's maps show a marked improvement on all earlier productions, 
the engraving being beautifully clear and distinct. The first atlas 
published by him was Cary's Neiv and Correct English Atlas, 1787. 
This was followed by a beautiful little road-atlas entitledCary'sTraveller's 
Companion, 1790. A second edition of the Companion was issued, with 
the title-page dated 1791 and the plates ]792, and other editions down 
to 1824. 

Mr. George Goode, of the University Library, Cambridge, informs me 
that he has recently purchased copies of Cary's Traveller's Companion 
dated 1806 and 1814. 

In 1798 Cary^s New Itinerary was published ; ten subsequent editions 
of this work were issued between 1798 and 1828. 

Gary in 1808 published the Netv Universal Atlas, containing sixty ; 
maps in large folio. It was first issued in twenty parts. A second edition | 
appeared in 1811, and a third in 1819. The following year — 1809 — Gary I 
brought out the Neiv English Atlas. It contained forty-six maps in j 
imperial folio, some of which had been separately issued as early as 1801. 
The work ran through several editions. 

Gary also published A Survey of the Country fifteen miles round 
London, 1786 ; A New and Accurate Plan of London, 1787 ; A Neio 
Map of France, divided into Departm^ents, 1790 ; A New Map of England, 
1794 ; A New Map of Ireland, 1799 ; A New Map of Chinese Tartary, 
1806 ; A New Map of Spain and Portugal, 1807 ; A New Map of Scot- 
^<xwd, 1808; and A New Map of Sweden, Denmark^ and Norway, 1821. 



By 1\ CUM. 253 

1788 

H Map of Wiltshire, engraved from an actual 
Survey, with improvements. English statute 
miles, 15 [=3f inches]. Haywood del. Sudlow sc. 
Engraved for J. Harrison, No. 115, Newgate 
Street, as the Act directs, April 11th, 1788, 
I3in. X 181in. 

In MAPS OF THE ENGLISH COUNTIES WITH SUBDIVISIONS OF HUN- 
DREDS . . . TO WHICH AllE ADDED TWO FOLIO PAGES OF LETTElt- 
PRESS TO FACE EACH MAP . . . LONDON : PRINTED BY AND FOR 
JOHN HARRISON, NO. 115, NEWGATE STREET, 1791. fol. 

A rather bare-looking map, showing towns, villages, enclosed parks, 
hills, hundreds (with their names indicated by reference numbers), roads, 
and the principal rivers. 

Bottom left-hand corner, the title, divided off with a plain line. In 
the middle, at the bottom, the scale of 15 miles. Top right-hand corner, 
a small compass-indicator occupying the centre of two squares formed by 
the lines of latitude and longitude. Bottom right-hand corner, the 
" Reference to the Hundreds," 

The border is formed by a single line, with a double inner line, marked 
off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. Outside the 
border, at the bottom, in left-hand corner, is " Heywood del.", in the 
middle, the imprint, and in right-hand corner, " Sudlow sc." The map 
is intersected by lines of latitude and longitude at every five minutes. 

With the map is a leaf, on one page being "Description of Wiltshire" 
in two columns, and on the other an account of Gloucestershire. 

1789 

Viltshire. By J. Gary, Engraver. Scale of statute 
miles, 10 [ = J iiuh]. London. Published, Sepr. l, 
1789, by J. Gary, Engraver, No. 188 Strand. 

:')L:iii. X 4; in. 

In (.'AUY's TIlAVELLEll's COMPANION, OR, A DELINEATION OF THE 
Tl !;\riKh] ROADS OF ENGLAND AND WALES; SHEWING THE IM- 
MKDlArE ROUT TO EVERY MARKET AND I'.OROUGH TOWN THROUGH- 
OUT THE KINGDOM. LAID DOWN FROM THE R.EST AUTHORITIES, ON 
A NEW SK/r (M- COUNTY MAI'S. TO WHICH IS ADDKD, AX ALl'llA- 
r.KTK'AL LIST OK .\L[- THE .NLVKKET TOWNS, WITH THE DAYS ON 
WHICH TllKV ARK IlKKD. LONDON : PRINTED KOR JOHN CAKY, 
ENCRAVKi;. NLM' .^ RIM N ISKLLKR, STILVN I », IsT. .LVNV., ITDU. 8vo. 



254 Ma'ps of Wiltshire. 

A small road map on thin paper, printed on one side only. Shows 
the towns, most important villages, rivers, and main roads, with the 
distances marked every two miles. 

Bottom left-hand corner, the scale. Around the boundary of the map 
are the names of the adjoining counties, and at the terminations of the 
roads, the names of the places to which they lead. Bottom of the plate, 
divided off by a thin line, the distances from London to the principal 
places in the county are given — beginning with " London to Salisbury 83." 

At the top, in the middle, the outside border line is carried up, and 
forms a narrow oblong panel, with vertical shading, in which the title is 
given, the letters being slightly ornamented. On one side of this panel : 
*' By J. Gary," on the other : " Engraver." The border is formed by two 
plain lines one-sixteenth of an inch apart. 

Above the border, at the top, a star compass indicator rises behind the 
border, showing only the upper half with indications W., N., and E. 
Below the border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

A Map of Wiltshire from the best Authorities 
Engraved by J. Gary. E. Noble delint. et 
curavit. Scale of statute miles, 10 [=3f inches]. 

IGin. X 20|in. 

In BRITANNIA : OR, A CHOROGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION OF . . , 
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, AND IRELAND ... BY WILLIAM CAMDEN. 
TRANSLATED BY R. GOUGH . . . LONDON: PRINTED BY JOHN 
NICHOLS FOR T. PAYNE AND SON, CASTLE-STREET, ST. MARTIN 'S 
LANE, 1789. fol. 

A clearly printed map, showing towns, villages, hamlets, hills, houses, 
parks, woods, camps, hundreds, rivers, and roads. The distances along 
the main roads are given in miles. The number of members returned 
to Parliament is shown by asterisks. 

Top left-hand corner, the scale. Bottom left-hand corner, the title, 
and, immediately below, the engraver's name. Top right-hand corner, 
a large star indicator of the points of the compass. Bottom right-hand 
corner, "E. Noble delink et curavit." 

The border is formed by plain double lines, and an inner double line 
marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. Between 
the border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude West from London." 

1790 
A New Map of Wiltshire from the latest Au- 
thorities. British statute miles, 10 [=2 inches]. 
J. Lodge so. London. Published as the Act 
directs Oct. 31st, 1790, by R. Butters, No. 79, 
Fleet Street. lOin. x 12iiri. 



By T. ChiiM. 255 

In THE POLITICAL MAGAZINE FOR OCTOBER 1790. PRINTED FOJi 
\l. BUTTERS, NO. 79, FLEET STREET. 8vo. 

An enlarged copy of the map engraved by W. Fowler, printed for 11. 
Sayer and Caringfcon Bowles; and issued in Elliiiy, Engliak Atlas, 1766. 

The map is clearly engraved, showing towns, villages, parks (enclosed 
with palisading), hills, woods, rivers, bridges, and main roads. The 
number of members returned to Parliament is indicated by asterisks. 

Top left-hand corner, a circular compass indicator, Bottom left-hand 
corner, the explanation of the signs used on the map. Top right-hand 
corner, the title, plainly engraved in bold letters. Bottom right-hand 
corner, the scale of 10 miles, and, innnediately below, " Lorigit. W. from 
London." The border is formed by a single Hue, with inner double line, 
marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. 

Outside the border, at the bottom, the imprint ; and in the right-hand 
corner, the engraver's name. 

Wiltshire. 4Jin, x 5|in, 

In ENGLAND DELINEATED ; OR, A GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION OF 
EVERY COUNTY OF ENGLAND AND WALES , . , BY JOHN AIKIN. 
LONDON : PRINTED PY T. BENSLEY ; FOR J. JOHNSON, ST. PAUL'S 
CHURCH-YARD, 1790. 8vo. 

This is an outline map, without a border or any ornament whatever. 

It shows the chief towns, the rivers, and one line of hills between the 
Wiley and Nadder, named " Chicklade hills." The county boundary is 
shown by a finely-printed dotted line. Around the boundary the names 
of the adjoining counties are given. 

The first edition of this work was published in 1788 ; but without maps. 
It was reprinted: 3rd ed. in 1795; 4th ed., 1800; 5th ed., 1803. 

1791 
A New Map of Wiltshire by Willm. Tunnicliff, Land 
Surveyor, 1791. Scale of miles, 10 [3] iiKlu.s], 

U\u\. X 19Un. 

7/t A TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVF.Y OF THE COUNTIES OF HANTS,WILTS, 
DORSET, SOiMElJSET, DEVON AND CORNWALL . . . I'.V WILLIAM 
TUXN'ICIJKF, LAND SURVEVOl!, SALISBURY : PRINTED KOI! Till'. 
AUTHOR i'.Y ]\. C. COLLINS . . . 1791. 8v(). 

A very plainly printed map, its special feature being the clear iiianner 
in which the hundreds are shown. Their names are printed in laige 
type, and ili(> l)()undaries traced by a dotted lino; each hundred l)eing 
coloured (lilferenllx- jind the detached ));irfs plainly shown. 

Shows towns, \illages, parks, seats, hills, main roads; hut no rivers. 
The Roman roads are n.-uued. Market towns are indii-ated by the way 
the church(>s are shown. Sulisbury IMain is given s(uiili ..I' llir W ilev, as 
well as ari)un(l SlonehenL;e. 



256 Ma^s of WiltsJiire. 

Top left-hand corner, explanations of the signs used on the map. Bottom 
left-hand corner, the title. To the left of the middle, at the bottom, the 
scale of 10 miles. On the right-hand side, a little below the middle, the 
four points of the compass are shown by transverse lines; the northern 
point having an ornamental arrow-head, the others being marked E., S., 
and W. 

The border is formed by two thin lines with an intermediate thick one, 
and two inner thin lines, marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude 
and longitude. Between the border lines, both at the top and bottom, 
" West Longitude." 

1792. 
A reprint of the Map of Wiltshire, engraved by 
Sudlow in 1788. 

Sir H. G. ¥ovdihdimnoie^ Qi,n ediiiow oi Maps of the English Counties 
hy J. Harrison^ 1792. 

A reprint of Gary's small Road Map of 1789. 

/?^ Gary's traveller's COMPANION . . . 1st jany., 1791. 8vo. 

The imprint on the map is altered to 1792, and the publishers' address 
given as 181, instead of 188, Strand. 

Printed on thick paper, and maps printed on both sides of the sheet. J| 

1793. 
Another edition of Gary's Map of 1787. 

In Gary's new and gorregt English atlas . . . printed for 

' JOHN GARY, . . . 181, NEAR NORFOLK STREET, STRAND, PUBLISHED 

AS THE AGT DIRECTS, JANY. IST, 1793. 4to. 

Many of the roads have been carried over the county boundary, and 
destinations and distances are given. The first date of publication 
(1787) has been kept in the imprint; but Gary's address has been 
corrected to J. Gary, Engraver & Map-seller, No. 181 Strand. 

1794. 
Wiltshire by John Gary, Engraver. To accompany 
the Agricultural Account of Wilts. By Mr. 
Thomas Davis. 

In A GENERAL VIEW OF THE AGRIGULTURE OF THE GOUNTY OF 
WILTS ... BY THOMAS DAVIS, OF LONGLEAT, WILTS . . . 
LONDON : PRINTED IN THE YEAR 1794. 8vo. 

A copy of the second edition of John Gary's map of 1793, first pub- 
lished in 1787. 

In this issue, immediately beloM^ Gary's name, in the bottom left-hand 
corner, is the announcement that the maps are " To accompany the 



By 1\ Chuhh. ' 257 

Agricultural Account of Wilts," etc., and to make room for this the 
original scale had to be shortened, and made 1 to 5 miles instead of 1 to 10. 
Colours are used to indicate the nature of the land, etc. Outside the 
border, at the bottom, the original imprint has been replaced by two 
columns of explanations of the colours. 

1795 
A Reprint of the Map of Wiltshire first issued in 
the second edition of England Delineated by 
J. Aikin, 1790. 

In ENGLAND D?]LINEATED. THIRD EDITION. 1795. 

Another edition of the map of Wiltshire in the 
"• Political Magazine," 1790. 

In [a collection of MAI'S OE THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND AND 
WALES, 1795.] 
The imprint and the engraver's name are erased from the plate. 
These maps were originally published in the Political Magazine by 
R. Butters ; but the imprints have been erased. 

1796. 
A reprint of G. Bickham's Bird's Eye view of 
Wiltshire, 1750. 

In A CURIOUS ANTIQUE COLLECTION OF BIRD^S-EYE VIEWS OF 
THE SEVERAL COUNTIES IN ENGLAND AND AVALES ; EXHIBITING A 
PLEASING LANDSCAPE OF EACH COUNTY . . . BY GEORGE BICKHAM, 
JUNIOR . . . LONDON, 1796. fol. 

Wiltshire. Engraved by B. Baker, Islington. Scale 
of miles, 8 [ -Ij inches]. 7Jin. x 9iii. 

In THP: UNIVERSAL MAGAZINE OF KNOWLEDGE AND PLEASURE 
FOR MARCH, 1796. LONDON : PUBLISHED ... BY W. BENT AT 
THE king's ARMS, PATERNOSTER ROW, 179G. 

A clearly en^^raved map, showin^^ towns, villages, parks, rivers, and 
roads, with the distances from London noted on the main roads. Salisbury 
Plain is given as being on the southern borders of the county, as well as 
around Stonehenge. The number of members returned to Parliamont is 
shown by asterisks. 

Top loft hand corner, tiie title in a long, sHghtly oval-sliapcd plaque, 
shaded vertically ; innnediately below, the engraver's name, and the scale 
of H miles. Tlie names of [ho chief towns in the adjoining counties, near 
the l)oi-(h'r of Wilts, arc shown wii li t licir disl a iiccs from i,on(h)n. The 
l)oi(]cr is foiined by a thick and thin hn(>, printed closely together, witii 
an inner line marked olV into d(>grees and minutes of bititude and Ioul;!- 
tiid(>. r>el\veen th(> i)or(ler lines, at the i)ottoni, " Longitude west from 
London." 



258 Ma'ps of Wiltshire. 

1800. 

Another reprint of the Map of Wiltshire issued in 
Ungland Delineated. 1790. 

In ENGLAND DELINEATED, BY JOHN AIKIN. 'JrTH ED. 1800. 

1801. 

A New Map of Wiltshire, divided into Hundreds, 
exhibiting its Roads, Rivers, Parks, etc. By 
John Cary, Engraver. 1801. Scale, 8 miles 
[=2 J inches]. London : Published by J. Cary, 
Engraver and Map seller. No. 181, Strand, 
Septr. 28, 1801. 19iin. x 21im. 
In Gary's new English atlas ; being a complete set of 

COUNTY maps, from ACTUAL SURVEY . . .ON WHICH ARE PAR- 
TICULARLY DELINEATED THOSE ROADS WHICH WERE MEASURED, 
BY ORDER OF THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL, 
BY JOHN CARY . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR J. CARY, ENGRAVER AND 
MAP-SELLER, NO. 181, NEAR NORFOLK STREET, STRAND, 1809. fol. 

A beautifully engraved map, showing towns, villages, hamlets, parks, 
woods, houses with their names, and the main roads, also named ; indi- 
cations of their direction being given at the point of entry to the county. 
Along the Bath and Bristol Koad, and the Burton, or Frome & Wells, 
Eoad, the distances from London are given mile by mile ; but on the 
other roads the distances given are those from London to the first town 
on the roads within the county and from town to town. The names and 
boundaries of the hundreds are given, and the detached portions are 
especially marked out. 

Top left-hand corner, a star compass indicator with eight points, the 
northern point being lengthened about an inch, with an ornamental 
arrow-head at the top. A little to the right of the indicator, a detached 
part of Wiltshire is shown. Bottom left-hand corner, a slightly oval 
plaque, shaded around the lower edge and bearing the title. Top right- 
hand corner, an inset showing the detached portions of Wiltshire in 
Berkshire. On the right-hand side, rather below the middle, a long band, 
vertically shaded, showing the scale of 8 miles. 

The border is formed by two fine lines with an intermediate thick one, 
and two tine inner lines marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude 
and longitude. Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude 
West of Greenwich." Outside the border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

This atlas was published in parts, from 1801 to ISOy ; and brought 
together in the form of an atlas in 1809. The maps were also sold 
separately, price 3s. 6t/. 



Jiy T. Ckahh. 259 

A New Map of the County of Wilts, divided into 
Hundreds. London : printed for C. Smith, No. 127, 
Strand. January 6th, 1801. Scale, 7 miles [^ 
'Ih inches.]. Jones & Smith, so., Pentonville. 17Jiii. 
X lOJin. 

In smith's new excujsh atlas ; being a complete set of 

COUNTY maps, divided INTO 1IUNDREDS,0M WHICH ARE DELINEATED 
ALL THE DIRECT AND CROSS ROADS, PART OF WHICH ARE FROM 
ACTUAL MEASUREMENT . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR C. SMITH, 
MAPSELLKR, NO. 172 (CORNER OF SURREY STREET), STRAND, 1804. 

fol. 

Very similar in construction to Gary's large map of 1801, and similarly 
coloured. 

Shows towns, villages, hamlets, hills, woods, parks, gentlemen's seats, 
rivers, roads, and hundreds. The last-named are shown by an engraved 
line as well as by colour, and their names are indicated by reference 
numbers. The distances, in miles, from London to the principal towns 
are given ; and also along the main roads from town to town ; and where 
the main roads enter and leave the county their direction is given. 

Top left-hand corner, a detached part of Wiltshire ; and, just below, a 
star indicator of the points of the compass, the northern point being 
extended and having an ornamental arrow head. Immediately below, 
" Jones & Smith, Sc, Pentonville," Bottom left-hand corner, explanations 
of signs used on the map, and, to the right, the scale of 7 miles. At the 
top, in the middle, the detached portion of Wilts runs into the border. 
Top right-hand corner, the title and imprint, and, a little below, enclosed 
by double lines up to the border, the detached portions of Wokingham 
and Swallowfield, In the bottom right-hand corner, a list of the hundreds, 
numbered 1 — 29. 

The border is formed by two very fine lines with an intermediate thick 
one ; and, half-an-inch within, are two fine lines divided oft" into degrees 
and minutes of latitude and longitude. 

Between the border lines, at the bottom, "Longitude West from 
Greenwich." 

These maps were originally issued separately in 180], and were not 
published as an atlas till 1804. 

Sir H. G. Fordham states that editions were issued in 1808, 1818, 1821, 
1827, 18413, and 1846 ; but the only copies known to me are those in the 
Britisli Museum, 1804 and 1808. 

1803. 

Another reprint of the map of Wiltshire, 1790. 

/// KN(,LAND DELINKATKD \\\ JOHN AIKIN. OTH KDITION. ISO;'.. 

8vo. 

:0L. XXXVIL — NO. (XVL T 



260 Maps of Wiltshire. 

Wiltshire. Scale of 10 miles \=--^ inch.] Sold by 
Iiuffman, 28, Little Bell Alley, Coleman Street, 
London. 2\ inches in diameter. 

In A NEW POCKET ATLAS AND GEOGRAPHY OF ENGLAND AND 
WALES, ILLUSTRATED WITH FII^TY-FIVE COPPER PLATES . . . 
BY JOHN LUFFMAN, GEOGR., LONDON. ENGRAVED, PRINTED & PUB- 
LISHED BY J. LUFFMAN, NO. 28, LITTLE BELL ALLEY, COLEMAN 
STREET, 1803. 8vo. ^ 

A small circular map showing only the towns and main roads. JB 

On the upper part of the map, within the county boundary, a small 
cross indicating the points of the compass. The inner circle of the plate 
is filled up to the border, with the names of the adjoining counties. 
There is a double circular border, each formed by a thick line, with a fine 
line on either side. Between the border lines, at the top, "Wiltshire," 
at the bottom, the scale ; on the left, " Sends 34 Members to Pari'"'." ; on 
the right, " Salisbury Co. Town, 83 miles from London." Outside the 
border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

The map is printed on the upper half of a small octavo page, the lower 
half being devoted to a short description of Wiltshire. 

1804 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 10 [--f inch.]. 3-|-iii. x 4fin. 

In THE PICTURE OF ENGLAND ILLUSTRATED WITH CORRECT 
COLOR'd maps of the several COUNTIES ... BY WILLIAM 
GREEN . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR J. HATCHARD, BOOKSELLER TO 
HIS MAJESTY, PICADILLY, 1804. 8vo. 

A small outline map in which the ordinary positions are reversed, the 
North being at the bottom. 

Shows towns, parks, rivers, and main roads. In top right-hand corner, 
the scale. In bottom right-hand corner, a plain arrow, with a cross line 
in the middle, indicating the North, 

The border is formed by a thick outer and a thin inner line close 
together. Outside the border, at the bottom, the title " Wiltshire." 

The arrangement of the maps in this work is very erratic. Some are 
printed with the North at the bottom, and others with the North at the 
left or right. 

A second edition of C. Smith's map of 1810, was 

issued January 6th, 1804. 

1805 

A reprint of Cary's Map, first issued in Camden's 
Britannia, 1789. 



/;// T. CJuihh. 261 

In BRITANNIA : OK A CHOKOGKAPllICAL DESCRirTlON OF . . . 
ENOLANI) . . . BY W. (CAMDEN. TRANSLATED BY HICHAKD COUGH. 
THE SECOND EDITION . . . PRINTED FOIi JOHN STOCKDALE, 
PICADILLY ; BY J. NICHOLS AND SON, RED LION PASSAGE, FLEPTr 
STREET, 1806. I'ol. 

" Published by John Stockdale, 16tli March, 1805," added to the plate, 
just below the title. 

1806 

A reprint of the second edition of Gary's small Road 
Map of 1792. 

In CARY'S traveller's companion. LONDON : PRINTED FOR 
JOHN GARY, ENGRAVER AND MAP-SELLER, STRAND, 1806. 8vo. 
The date on the map is corrected to '' July 1, 1806." 
Mr. G. Goode, of the Cambridge University Library, has supplied me 
with the details of this edition, from a copy in his charge, 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 10 [=f inch]. 4|in x 5in. 

In TOPOGRAPHICAL AND STATISTICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE 
COUNTY OF WILTS ... BY GEORGE ALEXANDER COOKE . . . 
PRINTED FOR C. COOKE, NO. 17, PATERNOSTER ROW : BY BRIMMER 
& CO., WATER LANE, FLEET STREET, ETC. [1806.]. 8vO. 

A small map, very similar to Gary's map of 1789. It is coloured 
according to the hundreds, the names of which are indicated by numbers. 
Shows towns, some of tlie villages, parks, rivers, and the main roads with 
distances from London. 

Top left-hand corner, a compass indicator, the northern point having 
an ornamental arrow-head. Bottom left-hand corner, the scale. Top 
right-hand corner, a list of the hundreds. 

The border is formed by a thick and a thin line close together, and 
one-eighth of an inch inside, is a double line marked off into degrees and 
minutes of latitude and longitude. At the top, between the border line, 
and carried slightly above, a shaded panel with the title "Wiltshire." 
At, tiie bottom, "Long', fr. London." Below the border, at the bottom, 
an explanatory note: "The Cities and County Towns are denoted by 
red, and the respective hundreds of the county by different colours, which 
distinctions are peculiar to this Superior Edition." 

\. reprint of the map engraved by B. Baker in the 
Universal Magazine, 1796 

/// i,A('i;ii': .\\i> w iiiTi'i.i':'s ni.;w and imtkonki) mnci.isii ah. as 
iM\ii)i;i) iNT(Mdr\ riivs . . . i.onkon: ri;i\Ti':i) a\i> im r.i.isiiKh 

1!V Kol'.Ki; r I.Al'IMK A\h JAMKS W 111 T Ti , K, \u. f.;:, ll.KKT >ri:KF.T. 

ISOT. ..1.1. Sv(.. 

T 2 



262 Maps of Wiltshire. 

A star-indicator of the points of the compass has been engraved as a 
background to the panel bearing the title, the points coming below the 
panel and partly obliterating the engraver's name. Distances from 
London have been corrected; and the main roads and parks coloured. 
Outside the border, at the bottom, the following imprint has been added; 
" Pubhshed October 13th, 1806, by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, 
London." 

1808. 
Another edition of C. Smith's map of 1801. 

Ill smith's new ENGLISH ATLAS, 2ND. EDITION, CORRECTED TO 

1808. fol. 

" 2nd edition, corrected to 1808 " is added to the plate. 

Wiltshire, in which every Parish and place is laid 
down containing upwards of 40 Houses. British 
miles, 10 [=li inch]. Cooper delt. et sculpt. Pub- 
lished January 1, 1808, by R. Phillips, Bridge 
Street, Blackfriars, London. 4iii. x 7in 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM 
. . . ACCOMPANIED BY FORTY-SEVEN MAPS DRAWN PURPOSELY 
FOR THIS WORK ... BY BENJAMIN PITTS CAPPER, ESQ. LON- 
DON : PRINTED FOR LONGMAN . . . PATERNOSTER ROW, 1813. 

8vo. 

Shows towns, some of the villages, the hundreds (with names indicated 
by reference numbers), rivers, and main roads. The number of the 
members returned to Parliament is shown by a fine line with a rounded 
head. Salisbury Plain is marked south of the Nadder, as well as around 
Stonehenge. 

Top left-hand corner, a detached part of the county ; and, a little below, 
the city of Bath is shown. Bottom left-hand corner, a list of the hundreds 
numbered I — 29. Top right-hand corner, a plain indicator of the cardinal 
points, the northern point having an arrow-head. Bottom right-hand 
corner, a list of the cities, boroughs, market towns, etc. Bottom, in the 
middle, the title and scale. Outside the border, top right-hand corner, 
" Plate XXXVIII " ; and at the bottom, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick and a thin line, close together, and 
the detail reaches it at the top and the two sides. 

1809. 

Wiltshire. Scale, 5 miles [=1 inch]. Drawn and 
engraved under the direction of J. Britton. En 
grav'd tay J. Hoper from a drawing by Gr. Cole, to 
accompany the Beauties of England and Wales. 

1809. Till. X 8fin. 



By T. Chuhh. 263 

In THE BlilTlSH atlas; COMPRISING A (JOxMPLETE SET OF 
COUNTY MAPS OF ENGLAND AND WALES, AVITII A GENERAL MAJ' (JF 
NAVIGABLE UIVEKS AND CANALS; AND PLANS OF CITIES AM) 
PRINCIPAL TOWNS. J/)NI)ON : PRINTED FOR VERNOR, HOOD, AND 
SHARPE . . . 1810. 4 to. 

This map is full of information. The hundreds are shown by colour 
as well as by an engraved line, and the names are indicated by reference 
numbers. 

Shows towns, villages, castles, houses, parks, camps, hills, roads ; and 
by asterisks the number of members returned to Parliament by the 
boroughs. The distances from London to the chief towns are given in 
Roman numerals. Salisbury Plain is not shown in the extreme soutli 
of the county, as is usual in most of the maps of the 18th century. 

Top left-hand corner, a compass-indicator, the northern point having 
an ornamental arrow-head, and, a little below, a detached portion of 
Wilts. Bottom left-hand corner, the scale. Top right-hand corner, 
explanations of signs used; and, immediately below, " Pt. of Wilts in 
Berks." Just below the middle, on the right-hand side, a list of the 
hundreds numbered 1 — 29. 

In the border, at the top, a long panel, which slightly raises the top 
line, shaded horizontally, and bearing the title " Wiltshire." Between the 
border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude west from Greenwich," and 
" Drawn and engraved under the direction of J. Britton," Outside the 
border, at the bottom left-hand corner, the engraver's name ; in the 
middle, the imprint, and, in right hand corner, "To accompany the 
Beauties of England k Wales," 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, and an 
inner double line, marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. 

The maps in the atlas were prepared and used for Beauties of England 
and Walea by J. Britton, S{ E. W. Brayley. 

1810. 

Topographical Map of the County of Wilts, 
describing the Seats of the Nobility and G-entry, 
Turnpike and Cross Roads, Canals, &c. Sur- 
veyed originally in 1773, by John Andrews and 
Andrew Dury . Second edition. Revised 
and corrected from the extensive information 
liberally communicated by the Right Honourable 
the Earl of Radnor and Sir Richard Hoare, Bart. 
To whom this improved edition is most respect- 
fully inscribed by William Faden, Charing Cross, 
January 1st, 1810. 



264 Maijs of Wiltshire. 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles 6 [=| inch.]. London: 
Published by J. Wallis, Engraver, 77, Berwick 
Street, Soho. ofin. x 5im. 

In WALLIS'S NEW POCKET EDITION OF THE ENGLISH COUNTIES, 
OR, traveller's COMPANION . . . LONDON : PUBLISHED BY J. 
WALLIS, ENGRAVER, BERWICK ST., SOHO, AND SOLD BY DAVIES & 
ELDRIDGE, EXETER, [1810]. 12mo. 

A small coloured map, showing the towns, principal villages, parks, 
rivers, coach and turnpike roads, the distances of the chief towns from 
London, and, by asterisks, the number of members returned to Parliament. 

Top left-hand corner, a small star-indicator of the compass, the northern 
point being elongated, and terminating with a spear-head. Bottom left- 
hand corner, the scale. 

The border is formed by double lines, the inner ones being divided into 
degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. The upper line, at the 
top, is slightly raised to accommodate a long panel, vertically shaded, 
containing the title ; and the lower bottom line is carried down half-an- 
inch below the inner one to give space for the explanation of the signs 
used. Between the border-lines, at the bottom, " Long. W. of Greenwich." 

1811. 
Ordnance Survey of England and Wales. Scale, 1 
inch=l mile. 

Sheets 14, 15, and 34 show nearly the whole of Wiltshire ; they were 
published in 1811, 1817, and 1828. 

There is no general title to this map. On sheet 15, the imprint : 
" Published 1st. Aug.* 1811 by Lt. Col. Mudge, Tower," at the bottom, in 
the left-hand corner. In the middle the scale ; and, in the right-hand 
corner, " Engraved at the Drawing Koom in the Tower by Benj". Baker 
and Assistants. — The writing by E. Bourne." Size of each sheet 30|in. 
X 24|in. 

Though not a map of the county, in the true sense of the word, the 
sheets joined up practically form one. This is the first map prepared 
from a scientific survey. From 1773 down to this time the maps of the 
county were based upon the survey by John Andrews and Andrew Dury ; 
but, after the publication of the Ordnance Survey, there was very little, 
if any, independent surveying. 

The Ordnance Survey is too well known to require any description, 
beyond a passing remark that it is hill shaded and all the surface features 
are given, with the height, in feet, above mean sea level at Liverpool. 

1812 

A reprint of the map of Wiltshire in the British 
Atlas, 1810 



By T. Chnhh. 265 

Fll THE BP:AUTIE,S of WILTSIIIUE IJY J. JUiJTTON. LONDON, 1812. 
VOL. 3. 
The preface in this volume is dated 1825. 

1813 
A reprint of the map of Wiltshire of 1808. 

In A T01'0(;i.MliI(JAL DICTION A KV OF THE UNTrED K1N(.;D0x\I, BY 
B. P. CAPPER, 1813. 

A map of Wiltshire. 

In WALLLS'8 NEW BlUTISH ATLAS . . . LONDON : PUBLISHED 
BY A. S. ODDY, 1812. 4P. 

The maps have, at the bottom, "London: Published by A. S. Oddy, 
1812"; but as some are dated 1813, the atlas, presumably, could not 
have been issued before that year. 

Subsequently reprinted, for Ellis's Neivand G orrect Atlas of Eiufland 
and Wales, 1819, with the imprint removed. 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 5 [^t i'^ch] Neele sculpt. 
352 Strand. 6|in. x 9^in. 

Ill A GENERAL VIEW OF THE AGRICULTURE OF WILTSHIRE . . . 
P>Y THOMAS DAVIS . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR SHERWOOD, 
NEELY, AND JO^ES, PATERNOSTER ROW, 1813. 8vo. 

Coloured to show the agriculture of the county, and giving the towns, 
villages, parks, woods, canals, rivers, and roads. Salisbury Plain is 
marked south of the Nadder as well as around Amesbury. 

Top left-hand corner, a detached part of Wilts, shown between the 
letters c and e in Gloucestershire. Bottom left-hand coiner, in a long 
panel, shaded horizontally, the title, and, below it, "To accompany the 
Agricultural Account of Wilts. By Mr Thomas Davis." Bottom right- 
hand corner, the scale. Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Longi- 
tude West from London." Below the border, in the right-hand corner, 
the engraver's name; and, takuig up the whole space below the border, 
tile explanation of the colours used on the map. 

The border is formed by two thin lines and an intermediate thick one, 
witl) a double imier line, marked olT into degrees and minutes of latitude 
and longitude. 

1814. 
A reprint of Gary's small map of the roads of Wilt- 
shire. 1789. 

/// <\\i;v's I'lv'AVKI.l.Kil's (OMTANION, 1S14. Svo. 
Tlic imprint on the map is altcicd to j\Iii\' 1st, IHIL 
A copy of tliis edition ol liu' alius has rccfiitiv ix'cn ;u-(|uiri'd i)y tiio 
University Library, Cambridge. 



266 ]\[ai)s of Wiltshire. 



1816. 

A reprint of the map of Wilts accompanying The 
Beauties of England, 1809, and reissued in the 
British Atlas, 1810. 

In ENGLISH TOPOGRAPHY BY J, NIGHTINGALE. LONDON : 
PPJNTED FOR BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY, PATERNOSTER ROW, 
1816. 4tO. 

According to Sir H. G. Fordham another edition of this work was 
published by James Goodwin and Thomas Mc Lean, with the original 
imprints erased ; but with the preface retaining the date October, 1816. 

1817 
Another edition of Gary's large map of 1801, dated 
1817. 

A copy is in the library of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural 
History Society at Devizes. 

1818. 

Reprint of Cary's Map of Wiltshire of 1787. 

Under this date Sir H. G. Fordham mentions a further edition of 
Gary's Neiv and Correct English Atlas. 

Reprint of Cary's Map of Wiltshire of 1801. 

Sir H. G. Fordham notes an edition of Cary's New English Atlas, 
1818. fol. 

A further reprint of C. Smith's map of 1801. 3rd. 
edition, corrected to 1818. 

In smith's neav English atlas . . . 1818. fol. 

A copy was recently purchased by the University Library, Cambridge. 

Another edition of the map engraved by Neele in 
1813. 

In THE NEW BRITISH TRAVELLER, OR A MODERN PANORAMA OF 
ENGLAND AND WALES. VOL. 4. LONDON : PUBLISHED BY J. 
ROBINS & CO., ALBION PRESS, IVY LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW, 1819. 
4t0. 

In this edition the note below the title and the " Explanation," outside 
the border, at the bottom, are erased ; in the top right-hand corner, a 
star compass-indicator, the northern point having an arrow-head, has 
been added ; outside the border line, at the bottom, " Published by J- 
Kobins & Co., Albion Press, London, January, 1, 1818." 



1 



By T. Chuhh. 267 

1819. 
Another reprint of Cary's small road map of 1789. 

In caky's tkavellek's companjon, 1819. 

Mentioned by Sir H. G. Fordham. 

A reprint of the map of Wiltshire in Wallis's New 
British Atlas, 1812. 

In ELLIS'S NEW AND COKHECT ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES, 
[1819]. 4t0. 
The original imprint is erased. 
The atlas is noted by Sir H. G. Fordham. 

A reprint of the map of Wiltshire by J. Wallis, 1810. 

In lewis's new TRAVELLEK'S guide, OU, a pocket EDITION OF 
THE ENGLISH COUNTIES . . . LONDON : PUBLISHED BY W. 
LEWIS, NO. 21, FINCH LANE, CORNHILL, 1819. 12""". 

The original imprint on the map is changed to " London : Published 
by W. Lewis, Finch Lane." 

Geological map of Wiltshire, by W. Smith, 
Mineral Surveyor. A new map of Wiltshire, by 
John Gary . . Scale 8 miles [^^2 J inches]. 

London: Published by J. Gary . . . January 
1st, 1819. 

A copy of Cary's large map of 1801, with an additional title added by 
\V. Smith ; the map coloured to show the geological formation, and 
surrounded with notes and colour panels relating to the geology ; with 
an addition, below the border, at the bottom, of two notes referring to 
sections of the strata. 

1820. 

Another edition of the map in the Beauties of 
England and Wales, 1809. 

I It ENGLISH TOroCKAl'llV, BY J. MCHTINCAl.E. PUBLISHED HY 
.1. (iOODWIN AND T. MC I>EAN. 1820. 

Sir H. G. Fordham notes the obliloralion of the imprint from the 
llci ifDiilshire map, so probably that is the cuso with tlic map of W'ihshire. 

Map of the County of Wilts, from Actual Survey, 
made in the years 1819 and 1820. By C. Greeu 
wood. Published for the Proprietors and sold 
at No. 70, Queen Street, Cheapside, London. 

VOL. X.WVll. — NO. (..Wl. U 



268 Ma^ps of Wiltshire. 

December 12th, 1820. To the Nobility, Clergy, 
and Gentry of Wiltshire, this map of the County 
is most respectfully dedicated by the Proprietors. 
Scale of statute miles, 9 [ = 9 inches]. 42in. X o6in. 

Shows towns, villages, hamlets, (with the market towns, parishes, and 
villages distinguished by the employment of different type,) houses, 
castles, churches, chapels, woods, plantations, heaths, commons, mills, 
rivers, brooks, canals, and roads. The boundaries of the hundreds are 
marked by engraved lines, and their names given in large type. 

The immber o£ members returned to Parliament by the boroughs is 
indicated by asterisks. The distances are given, in miles, along the 
main roads. Earthworks and other historical remains are shown. 

Top left-hand corner, a large star compass indicator, with an arrow 
passing through from South to North, and projecting 3J inches below the 
southern point of the star, and 2J inches above the northern point. The 
figure-head of the arrow is in the form of a " fleur-de-lis." Bottom 
left-hand corner, a beautifully engraved " North West View of Salisbury 
Cathedral, Drawn by E. Creighton, Engraved by Neele & Son, Strand." 

At the top, a little to the right of the middle, a detached part of Wilts. 
Top right-hand corner, the title ; immediately below, the imprint ; still 
lower, the dedication, and below this, the " Explanation " of signs. To 
the right of the middle, at the bottom, the scale. Between the border 
lines, at the bottom, "Longitude West from Greenwich." 

The border is formed by a fine outer and a very thick inner line, a 
space of three eighths of an inch horizontally shaded, or hatched, and 
two fine inner lines, divided into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude, the degrees being shown by Roman numerals. 

Charles and John Greenwood published maps on a similar scale of all 
the counties except Bucks, Cambridge, Hereford, Herts, Norfolk, and 
Oxford. 

Wiltshire. Scale of statute miles, 10 [=1 inch]. Neele 
& Son sc. 352, Strand. Bin x 6^iii. 

In PINNOCK'S county histories, vol. 6. THE HISTORY AND 
TOPOGRAPHY OF WILTSHIRE . . . LONDON: PRINTED FOR 
PINNOCK AND MAUNDER, 267 (ST. CLEMENT'S CHURCHYARD), 
STRAND, 1820. 8vo. 

A small, but clearly printed map, showing towns, principal villages, 
parks, gentlemen's seats, rivers, and roads, with the distances from London 
given along the main roads. All the main roads are carried across the 
county boundary to the nearest town in the adjoining county. 

Bottom left-hand corner, the scale. Top right-hand corner, an oblong 
band, or panel, vertically hatched, bearing the title. Just below, a star 
indicator of the compass. Outside the border, in the bottom right-hand 
corner, the engraver's name. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones. 






By T. Chnhh. 269 

1821. 

[Wiltshire] Neele & Son sc. 352, Strand. Pub- 
lished by Gr. and W. B. Whittaker, Ave-Maria 
Lane, 1821. Coloured. 

I7l THE TRAVELLKIl'S POCKET ATLAS CONSISTING OF A COMPLETE 
SET OF COUNTY MAPS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES, ON AN ORIGINAL 
AND IMPROVED PLAN . . . LONDON, PUJVLTSHED BY G. & W. 
B. WHITTAKER, 1823. 

Possibly a reprint of the map engraved by Neele & Son for Pinnock's 
County Histories, vol. 6, 1820. 

A copy of the atlas is in the University Library, Cambridge. 

1822 

A further edition of Gary's small road map of 
Wiltshire, 1789. 

Ill GARY'S traveller's COMPANION LONDON, 1822. 8vo. 
The imprint is altered to " London, Published by G. & J. Gary, No. 
86, St. Janies's Street, 1892." 

A copy of the atlas is in the University Library, Cambridge. 

A new map of the County of Wiltshire divided into 
Hundreds, by Mr. Thos. Dix. [Scale, about 4 miles^l 
inch] London. Published August 1st, 1816, by 
William Darton, Junr., 58, Holborn Hill. 14iiii. 
X 17Jin. Coloured. 

In A complete atlas of the ENGLISH COUNTIES, DIVIDED INTO 
THEIR RESPECTIVE HUNDREDS . . . COMMENCED BY THE LATE 
THOMAS DIX, OE NORTH WALSHAM ; CARRIED ON AND COMPLETED 
I'.Y ^VILLIAM DAUTON. LONDON, ^VILLIAM DARTON, 58, HOLBOKN 
IIIl.L. 1822. fol. 

A very full but clear map, with hill-shading, and divided into hundreds. 
Shows towns, villages, parks, woods, rivers, the principal roads (with the 
distances, in miles, from town to town), and cross roads. Most of the 
roads are engraved a little beyond the county boundaries!, the distance 
from towns in the adjoining counties being given. 

Top left-hand corner, a circular panel, enclosing the title. liottom 
left-hand corner, a view of " Mahnesbury Abboy-ClHU'ch, Soulii Aile, \'c. 
Wiltshiic." Top right-hand ctx iut, ''References" to tlie hundieds, in 
two columns, witli th(i '' J'jxplanation " undei-nc^atli. Bottom right-hand 
corner, a small star-indicator of the points of the compass. At the bottom, 
in the centre, "Scale" of 12 miles. ,\lso at the bottom, outside the 
border, the imprint ; uiul. l)elW(HMi the l)ordor linos, " Longitude West 

u 2 



270 Maps of Wiltshire. 

from Greenwich." The border is double-ruled with the degrees and 
minutes of latitude and longitude marked. 

I am indebted to Mr. George Goode for the information relating to this 
and the two preceding maps, 

1824. 
An unaltered reprint of Cooke's map of 1806. 

In THE tourist's AND TRAVELLEE'S GUIDE TO THE ROADS OF 
ENGLAND AND WALES, AND PART OF SCOTLAND . . . . BY 
GEORGE CARRINGTON GRAY. LONDON, 1824. 8vo. 

A reprint of the map engraved by Cooper and 
published by Phillips in 1808. 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM 
BY B. P. CAPPER . . . LONDON : PRINTED FOR G, 
B. WHITTAKER, 1825. 8 VO. 

In this edition of 1824 the map itself shows no change ; but the number 
of houses given is altered from 29,462 to 42,831, and of the inhabitants 
from 185,107, to 222,157 ; the engraver's name has been removed, and 
the imprint altered to " PubHshed by G. & W. B. Whittaker, 13, Ave 
Maria Lane, 1824." 

1825. 

Ebden's Map of the County of Wiltshire : divided 
into Hundreds laid down from Trigonometrical 
observation, by W. Ebden. Hoare and Reeves 
so., Warwick Court, Holborn. Scale, 10 miles 
[=2f inches]. London. Published Novr. 12, 1825, 
by William Cole, 10, Newgate Street. 13iin. x 
16fin. 

Shows towns, villages, hamlets, parks, woods, canals, rivers, main and 
cross roads. The hundreds are marked by an engraved boundary line, 
with reference numbers to indicate the names. The distances, in miles, 
from London are shown at the principal towns, and from town to town 
along the main roads. 

Top left-hand corner, "Explanation" of the signs used; immediately 
below, a detached part of Wiltshire, and, near by, a star-indicator of the 
points of the compass, with an elongated northern point, terminating in 
an ornamental arrow-head. Bottom left-hand corner, the title ; and, a 
little to the right, the scale of 10 miles. Top right-hand corner, a small 
inset with two detached parts of Wiltshire. Bottom right-hand corner, 
a list of the hundreds with reference numbers. 



By T, Olmhh. 271 

Between the border lines, at the bottom, "Longitude West from 
Greenwich." Below the border, in the middle, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two fine ones, a space of 
a quarter of an inch, and two fine inner lines divided off into degrees and 
minutes of latitude and longitude. 

Wiltshire, Scale of miles, 10 [ = |: of an inch] London. 
Published by R. Miller, 24, Old Fish Str. 2^in. x 
4Jin. 
In miller's new miniature vVtlas, containing a complete 

SET OF COUNTY MvVrS . . . LONDON. PUBLISHED P>Y R. 
miller, 24, OLD FISH ST., ST. PAULS. [1825]. 8vo. 

Quite a small map, the main feature of which is tliat the roads are 
very clearly given. Tlie towns, and a few of the principal villages, parks, 
and rivers are also shown. 

Top left-hand corner, a small arrow with transverse line, showing 
the North. Top right-hand corner, the scale. At the bottom, in the 
middle, a long, vertically-shaded band, with the angles bevelled, enclosing 
the title. Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Long. W. from 
Lon." Below the border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, and an 
inner double line marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. The plate is numbered 38. 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 10 [ = 2 ii»<^Ji]- 2giii. x 3iiii. 

I7l the pocket TOURIST AND ENGLISH ATLAS, BEING A NEW 
AND COMPLETE SET OF COUNTY MAPS . . . LONDON : PRINTED 
FOR 0. HODGSON, MAIDEN LANE, WOOD ST. [1825]. 16ino. 

This map bears a resemblance to the one in Miller's Neu^ Miniature 
Atlas, 1825. Its principal features are the parks and roads. The towns, 
and a few villages are also shown, and the distances from London are 
given at the principal towns. In a break in the ornamental border at 
the top, the title " Wiltshire" in plain capitals. 

Top right-hand corner, an arrow, with a transverse line, indicating the 
north. Bottom left-hand corner, the scale. In the border, at the botton), 
within plain lines, projecting slightly above and below the border, " This 
County contains 821,120 Acres, 804 Parishes, 1 City, 20 IMarket T., 
293,828 Inhabitants and sends 84 mem. to Pari." 

The border is formed by a line with horizontal hatching, J-in. wide, 
inside ; decorated by ornaments, somewhat like spear-heads, linked 
together. 

1826. 

L further reprint, without alteration, of the map 

published by G. and W. B. Whittaker, 1824. 

/// A rorocKAi'iiii'Ai. i)i( ridNAitv . . I'.v r.. r. cAPrKi:, 

1820. 



272 Maps of Wiltshire. 

1827. 

Smith's New English Atlas. 

Sir H. G. Fordham thinks it probable that an edition of Charles 
Smith's Neiv English Atlas was issued about this date, as he has seen a 
copy of Smith's Map of Hertfordshire, 1801, corrected to 1827. 

1828 

New English Atlas. 

Sir H. G. Fordham states that he knows of several county maps by 
John Gary, with imprint dated 1828, and he has no doubt that an edition 
of the New English Atlas was issued in that year. 

1829. 
A reprint of the map engraved by Cooper, 1808, as 
corrected in 1824. 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONAEY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM 
. . . BY B. P. CAPPEK ... A NEW EDITION. LONDON; 
PRINTED FOR SIR RICHARD PHILLIPS AND CO. 1829. 8vo. 

Map of the County of Wilts, from an Actual Survey 
made in the years 1819 and 1820. By C. and J. 
Greenwood. Published by the Proprietors Green- 
wood & Co. ,13, Regent Street, Pall Mall, London. 
Corrected to the present period and Published 4 
July, 1829. Engraved by J. & C. Walker, 47, 
Bernard St., Russel Sqe. Scale of miles, 10 [=3fin] 
27in. X 22 Jin. 

In ATLAS OF THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND, FROM ACTUAL SURVEYS 
MADE FROM THE YEARS 1817 TO 1833, BY C. & J. GREENWOOD, 
PUBLISHED BY THE PROPRIETORS GREENWOOD & CO., BURLEIGH 
STREET, STRAND, LONDON. PUBLISHED APRIL IST, 1834. fol. 

A beautifully engraved map, very full of information, showing towns, 
villages, hamlets, parks, hills, woods, forests, heaths, commons, canals, 
rivers, mills, roads, and toll bars. The hundreds are shown by a dotted 
line, and the names are indicated by numbers. The number of members 
returned to Parliament is shown by asterisks. 

Top left-hand corner, the title. Bottom left-hand corner, " Salisbury 
Cathedral. Creighton del'." Top right-hand corner, a large star 
indicator of the points of the compass, with the cardinal points elongated, 
the northern one having an arrow-head, and the centre decorated. The 
lower right-hand side of the plate is occupied by the " Explanation " and 
" Reference to the Hundreds." 



By T. Chnhh. 273 

Bottom, in the luiddle, the scale, and immediately beneath this 
"Wiltshire contains 1896 square miles," followed by " Longitude AVest 
from Greenwich." 

The border is formed by two double lines enclosing a space of three 
eighths of an inch, horizontally hatched by thick and thin lines alternately 5 
broken at every five minutes by panels containing Roman figures for the 
degrees and plain figures for the minutes. The inner and finer lines are 
marked off' into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude. 



Wiltshire Scale, 8 miles [^SJ inches]. London. Pub- 
lished by Henry Teesdale & Co., 302, Holborn 

18-|in. X 16Mn. 

In NEW lUUTISlI ATLAS, COxNTALMKG A COMri/K'I'E SET OF COUNTY 
MAPS . , . COliKECTED TO THE YEAE, 1829 . . . LONDON. 
PURLISIIEI) IJV IIENlfY TEESDALE & CO., ^302, llOLIiOlJX. fol. 

A beautifully engraved map, full of information, and coloured according 
to the hundreds, which are also indicated by an engraved line. Shows 
towns, villages, hamlets, parks, seats, woods, canals, rivers, main roads, 
and bye-roads. The distances from town to town are given along the 
main roads, and from London to the principal towns. Around the county 
boundary are notes of distances. 

Top left-hand corner, a star indicator of the points of the compass with 
the northern point elongated, and terminating in an arrow-head. A little 
below, and near the border, a detached part of the county. Bottom 
left-hand corner, " Explanation " of the signs used ; and slightly to the 
right of this, the scale. Top right-hand corner, the title " Wiltshire," 
without ornament. Bottom right-hand corner, the '* Reference to the 
Hundreds." Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude West 
from Greenwich." Outside the border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, a space of 
a quarter of an inch with two fine inner lines, marked off into degrees 
and minutes of latitude and longitude. 

''Corrected to tlie year 1829" implies some earlier edilit)n, but 1 have 
not succeeded in iiniliii'' one. 



1830. 
A Reprint of Cooke s Map of 1806 

There was, prol)ably, a reprint, about this (bite, of the map of Wiltshire, 
issued in 7'n/t<i'/i->i/>h/c<tf >tihl Sfa/isf/cal /)< scr/'/y/in/i <>/ tkr Count jf of 
Wilts . . . ' f>!/ (r'><»yf^ Ai>.r't,n/n- ('on/,-> . . . ISOrt ; but I have 
not seen it. 'i'licrc is, hoxscvcr, in the lliitish Miisi'uni, a \i)lunie for 
l)<n'onshite, described as tlH'"Thii(l I'dition," ami dih- iov Cheshiri', 
described as " A New Edition," and dated 183ll. 



274 Maps of Wiltshire. 

1831 

[Map of Wiltshire.] 

Sir H. G. Fordham mentions an Atlas of the English Counties., pub- 
lished in 1831, the maps of which bear the imprint " London. Published 
May 1st, 1831, by T. L. Murray, 19 Adam Street, Adelphi." 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 10 [=1J inches]. Drawn 
by R. Creighton. Engraved toy J. and C Walker. 
Drawn and engraved for Lewis' Topographical 
Dictionary. 7in. x lOin. 

Lb A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND . . . BY 
SAMUEL LEWIS AND CO., 87, ALDERSGATE STREET, 1831. 4tO. 

A clearly printed map, showing towns, hills, and the main roads. 

Top left-hand corner, the title. Bottom left-hand corner, a small star 
indicator of the compass, with arrow-head to the north ; and, immediately 
below, the scale. Top right-hand corner, within a double line running 
to the border on the right, " Detached parts of Wilts situate in the Co. of 
Berks." At the bottom, between the border lines, '' West Longitude from 
Grreenwich " ; and, outside, at the bottom, on the left, the draughtsman's 
name, on the right, the engraver's name, in the middle, the imprint. 

The border is formed by two thin lines with an intermediate thick one, 
and an inner double line divided into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. 

A reprint of the map toy Teesdale, 1829. 

In TEESDALE'S new BRITISH ATLAS . . . REVISED AND 
CORRECTED TO THE YEAR, 1831. 

This is from information supplied to me by Mr. George Goode, from a 
copy in the University Library, Cambridge. 

1832 

Another edition of the Map in '' Atlas of the English 
Counties," 1831. 

Mr. George Goode informs me that the county maps, in the copy of 
the Atlas of the English Counties, in the University Library, Cambridge, 
are dated May 1st, 1832 ; and that a copy was advertised, in Mr. Francis 
Edward's Catalogue, May, 1910, under the date of 1830. 

Wiltshire. Robert K. Dawson, Lieut. RE. Scale of 
miles, 8 [-=1J inches] R. Martin, 124, High Hol- 
toorn, and 5, Carey St. Size of map, 7in. x 9 Jin. 
Paper, ISiiii. x 23iii. 



% T. Chithh. 275 

In PLAN.S OF THE (JJTIES AND MOliOlKIHS OK M\(iLAXlJ AND 
WALES, SHOWINCI THE BOUNDAKJE.S AS ESTAHLISHED UY THE 
BOUxYDARIES ACT . . . 1832. VOL.2. LONDON : PUIXTED 
BY JAMES AND LUKE, 0. HANSARD c^ SON, NEAfl LINCOLN'S INN 
FIELDS, 1832. fol. 

An outline 2nap divided into Northern and Southern divisions for 
pohtical purposes. The hundreds are named and indicated by an en^.aved 
nie, the boundary also being coloured. Only the main roads and principal 
towns are given, colours are used to show the number of members re- 
turned to Parliament, a.id the polling places are shown by maltese crosses. 
Jiottoni left-hand corner, the scale, and, imn.ediately below, the 
ithographer's name. Top right-hand corner, the title, and a little below 
the middle, on the right, and close up to the boundary line, a plain arrow 
with transverse line, indicating the North. Just below " Explanations '' 
of the signs used, and, still lower down, the signature " Robt. K. Dawson, 
Lieut. K.E. ' 

There is no border to the map. 

Wiltshire Engraved by S. Hall. English miles, 10 
[li inches] London. Published by Chapman and 
Hall, No. 186, Strand, Feb., 1832. Um, x 9|in. 

In A T01>0(il!AI>HI(:AL DICTIONAIIV OK GKEAT BIHTAIN AND 
IRELAND . . . BY JOHN GORTON . . . VOL 3. LONDON • 
CHAJ'MAN AND HALL, 186, STRAND. 1831—38. 8vo. 

Shows towns, principal villages, parks, canals, hills, main roads, and 
some cross roads. The hundreds are given by engraved lines, and tlieir 
names indicated by reference numbers. 

Top left-hand corner, a rectangular panel, with bevelled edges, bearin- 
the title, and, immediately below, the engraver's name. Bottom left''- 
hand corner, the scale. Top right-hand corner, enclosed with a double 
hue joniing the border at the top and sides, " Part of Wiltshire locallv 
situate in Berkshire." Slightly below the middle, on the right, the 
Reference to the hundreds." and. in the corner below, an arrow with 
transver.se lino, indicating the North. Between the border lines at the 
bottom, " Longitude West from Greenwich." Below the border tho 
nnprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line with a fine line on either side and 
two hne mner lines, marked olT into degrees a.id minutes of latitude and 
lont^ntudc. 

''iltshire. Drawn & En^rravod for Cobbett s Geo- 
graphical Dictionary of England and Wales. 

(4in. X r);iii. 
L. X.X.WIL — NO. , WL 



276 Ma;ps of Wiltshire. 

In A GEOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND AND WALES . . 
BY WILLIAM COBBETT. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY WM. COBBETT, 
11, BOLT COURT, FLEET STREET ... 1832. 8vo. 

A small outline map, merely showing the towns and the county boun- 
dary by a plain line. Bottom half of the left-hand side, is an arrow, with 
transverse line, indicating the North ; the northern point being orna- 
mented, and the others marked E., S., W. Bottom right-hand corner, 
an oblong panel, formed by two fine lines, and bevelled at the corners, 
encloses the title. Below the border, at the bottom, " Drawn & Engraved " 
etc., as given above. 

The border is formed by two lines close together, the outer one thick 
and the inner one thin. 

Wiltshire. Iiondon: Published April 1st, 1832, by 
Nichols & Son, 25 Parliament Strt. Siln. x 5in. 

In THE FAMILY TOPOGRAPHER . . . BY SAMUEL TYMMS. 
VOL. 2. LONDON : J. B. NICHOLS AND SON, 25, PARLIAMENT 
STREET, 1832. 8vo. 

A small map, the main features of which are the canals and roads. 
Shows the towns and a few villages; but is generally bare of information. 
Top right-hand corner, an arrow, with cross line near the bottom, indi- 
cating the North. Across the bottom, in the middle, " Wiltshire." Above 
the border : " The figures affixed to the towns show the distance from 
Salisbury." 

The border is formed by a double line. Below the border, the imprint. 

1833. 

A reprint of the map first issued in Lewis' Topo- 
graphical Bictionary of England, 1831. 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DLCTIONARY OF ENGLAND ... SECOND 
:. EDITION . . . BY S. LEWIS, 1833. 

'With a note added at the top, outside the border, "Places of Election 
idr Northern Division. Devizes. Polling Places," etc. 

Wiltshire. Engraved by Gray & Son. 

Sir H. G. Fordham states that A New and Comprehensive Gazetteer of 

' England by James Bell was published in 1833 ; but I have not been 

successful in finding a copy. The map of Wiltshire, engraved by Gray: 

& Son, and published by A. Fullerton & Co., is described under the date 

of the second issue, 1836. 

Another edition of the Map by S. Hall, 1832. 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF GPtEAT BRITAIN . .; • BY 
JOHN GORTON, 1833, 8vo. 



^ Bu T. Chiihh. Ill 

Another edition of S. HalFs map of 1832. 

In A NEW iUilTJSII ATLAS 15Y S. HALL, LONDON, 18o3. 8vo. 
An edition of the atlas is mentioned by Sir H, G. Fordham, all the 
maps of which are dated 1833. 

1834 

'Wiltshire, '^^in. x :j/,.in. 

In THE (;eo(;iiaphv ok the iuhtlsh jsles ... by alvry 

MAJiTHA KODWELL . . . LONDON: I'UIXTEI) FOR LONGMAN 
. . . PATERNOSTER ROW, 1884. 

A very small outline map showing only the rivers and the positions of 
the towns, and Chicklade hills. The names of the towns are indicated 
by numbers ; tlie plains and downs by capital letters ; and the rivers by 
small letters. Tlie county boundary is shown by an engraved line, and 
outside that is a dotted line, broken in five places at the junctures of the 
surrounding counties. With this exception, and the title " Wiltshire " 
given in the top right-hand corner, the space between the county boundary 
and the border is bare. The map occupies the upper half of an octavo 
page, the lower half being used for a map of Berkshire. 

The border is formed by a double line around the page with a similar 
line dividing the two maps. On the page, facing the map, at the head 
of the chapter on Wiltshire, are the reference letters and numbers. 

1835. 
(L further reprint of Teesdale's map of 1829. 

In teesdale's new BRITLSH atlas . . . REVISED AND 
CORRECTED TO THE YEAR 1835. 

The Parliamentary representation, population, and assessed taxes 
added to tlio map. 

A copy of this edition of the atlas is in the University Library, 
Cambridge. 

A. further reprint of the map in Lewis' Topo- 
graphical Dictionary, 1831, with thonulc added U) the 
second edition i-enioviMl, 

Til a .su|)|)leinentary \'(>liini(^ issued with A toI'ik.kaimik Ai, 

DM TIONAK'V . . . miK!) KhllloN, KTC, 1836. 

1836. 
1 farther reprint of the Map by S. Hall, 1832. 

/// A NKW r.lMTISH ATLAS . . . I'.V.^IDNKV ILVI.I.. I.mMmiX: 
<llAr\lA\ \- HALI., 18G, STIIAXD. 1 S-'^li. S\-... 

'V\w ori^iiKil (liilc is ii'1iu)\(m1, ami [\\v huiuhcds t-ulourciL 

X L' 



278 Maps of Wiltshire. 

Wiltshire. English miles, 10 [=1| inches.]. Eng.d by 
G-ray & Son. Pub.d by Arch.d PuUarton & Co., 
GrlasgfOW. Vfin. X 9Jin. 

In A NEW AND COMPREHENSIVE GAZETTEER OF ENGLAND AND 
WALES . . . BF JAMES BELL . . . VOL. III. PART I. 
GLASGOW: A. FULLAETON & CO., 34, HUTCflESON STREET, AND 31, 
SOUTH BRIDGE, EDINBURGH, 1886. 8vo. 

Very similar to the map engraved by S. Hall in 1832, and issued in 
A Topographical Dictionary . . . by John Gorton, 1833. 

Shows towns, villages, parks, hills, canals, rivers, roads, and the 
hundreds, shown by an engraved boundary and with their names indi- 
cated by figures. 

Top left-hand corner, the title, and just below, the scale. Bottom 
left-hand corner, a compass indicator, formed by four crossed lines, the 
northern point having an ornamental arrow-head. Top right-hand 
corner, enclosed by a double line up to the border, " Part of Wiltshire 
locally situate in Berkshire." 

Lower half of the plate, on the right : " Eeference to the Hundreds," 
with note below : " The figures prefixed to the towns denote the distances 
from London." Between the border lines, at the bottom, "Longitude 
West from Greenwich " ; right-hand corner, below the border, the en- 
graver's name; and, in the middle, the imprint. 

The border is formed by two thin lines with an intermediate thick 
one, and an inner double line, marked off into degrees and minutes of 
latitude and longitude. 

Wiltshire. Drawn and engraved for Moule's Eng- 
lish Counties by W. Schniollinger. [Scale about 
5 miles to the inch.] Sin. x 10|in. 

In THE ENGLISH COUNTIES DELINEATED ; OR, A TOPOGRAPHICAL 
DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND ... BY THOMAS MOULE . . . 
LONDON : GEORGE VIRTUE, 26, IVY LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW, 1834 

4fco. 

A clearly engraved map, of which the roads are the chief feature, 
showing towns, some of the villages, parks, canals, rivers, main roads 
and cross roads ; with the boundaries of the hundreds engraved and their 
names indicated by numbers. 

Top left-hand corner, a detached part of the county. Bottom left-hand 
corner, a view of the west end of " Salisbury Cathedral." Top right- 
hand corner, " Part of Wiltshire locally situate in Berkshire" ; and, jusfc 
below, a shield with an eagle holding a sceptre in its right claw and an 
orb in the left. A little below the middle, on the right-hand side, a shield 
with the arms of the Bishop of Salisbury, surmounted by a mitre ; im- 
mediately below, " Reference to the Hundreds." In bottom right-band 



;;// T. chu.hh. 279 

corner, and extending over the middle ol' the plate, a view of " Stone- 
henge." 

There is no border, but on the yides are fluted columns, decorated with 
figures of two angels holding blank shields surmounted by crowns, and 
supporting an elegantly carved screen engraved across the top of the map. 
The colunm on the right begins just above the view of Stonehenge, and 
tliat on the left, above the view of the Cathedral. In the middle of the 
screen, which is broken into in the right-hand corner, by the detached 
parts of the county, is a band folded at the ends, containing the title 
" Wiltshire." 

I have not seen this edition, for which Sir H. G. Fordham is my 
authority; but have described it from the later edition of 1837 in the 
British Museum. 

1837 

A reprint of the map by W. SchmoUinger, 1836. 

In THE EN(.;M8II counties DEI.lNMVrED . . . 1)Y THOMAS 

MOULE, 1837. 4". 

1838. 

Wiltshire. Engraved on steel by Pigot & Son, 
Manchester. Scale 10 miles [2 inclies] Published 
by Pigot & Co., 50 Fleet Street, London, & 18 
Fountain Street, Manchester. 8^in. x lo^in. 

Ill IMOOT & CO.'S JUMTISll ATI, AS, CO.MPIIISING THE COUNTJES OF 
ENOLANI) AXl) WALES . . . PUBLISHED \\\ .1. I'KiOT & CO., 59, 
FLEET STREET, LONDON, AND FOUNTAIN STREET, ^rANClIESTER, 
[1838.] fol. 

The map is remarkable as bein^' the Ih-st one with railways, but it has 
an overcrowded appearance. 

The county is divided into two parts by an en/^raved line, and coloured 
according,' to the Keform ]3ill. It shows towns, villages, parks, woods, 
and downs (both named), canals, rivers, the number of members returned 
to Parliament, pollin;,' places, hundreds (with names indicated by num- 
bers), mail, turnpike, and bye roads, and the railwuy from Swindon to 
Bath. 

Top left-hand corner, a vifw of " Salisbury CatluMhal." Koltom K'ft- 
hand corner, "Explanation" of si-ns used. 'Vo\) rii^hl-liand t-oiiicr. an 
inset with double-lined border, of the detached parts of Wiltshire situate 
in Berkshire! ; and, just to the left, the " Reference to tlu' Hundreds," in 
three cohnnns. A little btdow the inset plan, a small i-onipass-indicalor, 
with elongati'd northern point. 

Tlit^ bord.M- al, iht' top is broken by a panel eontdinim,' tli«-> title 
" Wihsliire " ; and, at the iioiloni, in a similar panel, the scale. j5eK)W 
the bordei-, ul tli^ bottom ri'_;lii hand corner, the I'ligruver's name ; ami 



280, Maps of Wiltshire. 

in the middle, the imprint. Between the border lines, at the bottom, 
"Longitude West." 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, and a 
double inner line, marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. The roads are carried across the county boundary up to the 
border of the plate. 

Sir H. G, Fordham thinks that probably there was an earlier edition 
of this work. 

1840. 

A reprint of the map published in Lewis' Topo- 
graphical Dictionary of England, 1831. 

In VIEW OF THE REPRESENTATIVE HISTORY OF ENGLAND BY 
SAMUEL LEWIS, 1840. 4to. 
This is noted by Sir H, G. Fordham, but I have not seen a copy. 

A farther reprint of the map of 1831 as altered 
in 1833. 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND ... BY 
SAMUEL LEWIS. FOURTH EDITION. 1840. 4^. - 

A reprint of the map by H. Teesdale, 1829. 

In TEESDALE'S new BRITISH ATLAS, [1840]. 
Noted by Sir H. G. Fordham. 

Curiosities of G-reat Britain. England and Wales 
Delineated . . . By Thomas Dugdale. 

Sir H. G. Fordham thinks this was probably published in 1840, 
and new editions in 1843, 1850, and 1860. The map of Wiltshire will be 
described under the date of 1858, as I have seen no earlier edition. 

A reprint of the map by Figfot & Son, 1838. 

/-^Z, PIGOT & CO.'S BRITISH ATLAS, [1840]. fol. 

The maps of England, Ireland, and Scotland are dated 1840, and the 
map of the environs of London, 1839. A copy of the atlas has recently 
been purchased by the University Library, Cambridge. 

Map of the County of Wiltshire : Divided into 
Hundreds. Coniaining [sic] the District Divisions, 
and other local Arrangements effected by the 
Reform Bill. Scale, 10 miles [= 2f inches]. London: 
Published by J. Duncan, Paternoster Bow, [1840]. 
13|iii. X ITJiii. 



7?;// T. ClniBK 281 

In A COMPLETE COUNTY ATLAS OF ENCLAND AND AVy\LIi:.S ; ('ON- 
TAINING FORTY-FOUR SUPERIOR MAPS, WWW ALL THE PAILPOADS, 
ETC. LONDON. 1840. fol. 

A clearly engraved map showing towns, villa<,'es, hamlets, parks, 
woods (with names), forests, hills, canals, rivers, railways, polling places, 
the number of members returned to Parliament, main and bye roads, the 
distances from London to the principal towns, and from town to town, 
in figures along the roads. 

Top left-hand corner, " I^'xplanations " of signs used, and, just below, 
a detached part of the county. A little lower still, a star-indicator of the 
compass, with the northern point elongated and surmounted with a 
fleur-de-lis. Bottom left-hand corner, the title ; and, a little to the right, 
the scale. Top right-hand corner, an inset, enclosed by a double line, of 
the detached parts of Wilts in Berkshire. Lower half of the plate, on 
the right, " Reference to tlie Hundreds." In bottom right-liand corner, 
"County Members 4. Elections at ^ ." 

Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude West from 
Greenwich." Below the border, at the bottom, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, witli an 
inner double line marked of!' into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. 

The Britisli Museum copy of tliis atlas is imperfect and without a title- 
page. 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 10 [=^7^ inclK]. Pigot & 
Slater, Manchester. Published by Pigot &; Co., 
London and Manchester, 4in. x 6|ii). 

/// A J'OCKET TOPOCKAPIIY AND GAZETTEER OF ENGLAND . . . 
P.Y PIGOT & CO. VOL. 1. LONDON: PIGOT & CO., FLEET STIJEKT 
. . . AND PIGOT AND SLATKR, FOUNTAIN STREET, MANCHKSTEK' 
[1840]. Svo. 

Reduced from the map in Pigot ».^^ Co.'s Britisli Atlas, 1838. 

The view of Salisbury C^athedral, which appears on the 1888 map, is 
here separately printed on tlie upper half of a page facing the map, the 
lower half being employed for a "Distance Table of Wiltshire." 

Shows towns, villages, parks, canals, rivers, and main roads. The 
detail is carried to the border of the map on the East and West. 

Top left-hand corner, the detached part of Wilts situate in Berkshire, 
enclosed by a double-line border; and, a little to the left, an arrow, with 
cross line, indicating the North. IMiddle, at the top, tlie border is 
opened out, and encloses the title. Similarly arranged, in the bottom 
border, is the scale. Bcdow the border, in th(> rJLjht-lKind roiner. llie 
engraver's name, and, in th(> middle, the imprint. 

Tlif honlci- is foniicil hy uiliiek line ix'iwecii two t hin ones and an 
inner double line, marked oil' into (tei,Mees uml minutes of latitude and 
longitude, 



282 Maps of Wiltshire. 

1841. 
Wiltshire. By J. & C. Walker. 

In THE BRITISH ATLAS, LONDON [1840]. fol. 

Sir H. G. Fordham states that The first edition of The British Atlas, 
by J. ^ C. Walker, was probably published in 1841, The map of 
Wiltshire will be described under the date of 1862, the only edition with 
which I am acquainted, 

1842. 
Another copy of the map of Wiltshire in Pigot & 
Go's British Atlas, 1838. 

In PIGOT & CO.'S ROYAL NATIONAL AND COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 
AND TOPOGRAPHY . . . JULY, 1842. PUBLISHED BY J. PIGOT 
& CO., FLEET STREET, LONDON, AND FOUNTAIN STREET, MAN- 
CHESTER, 1842. 8vo. 

A farther reprint of the map of 1831. Drawn by 
R. Creighton. 

In lewis' TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND . . . 
FIFTH EDITION. LONDON, 1842. 4^. 

1843. 

A reprint of the Map engraved by Gray & Son, 
1836 

In THE PARLIAMENTARY GAZETTEER OF ENGLAND AND WALES 
... VOL. IV. LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND GLASGOW. A. 
FULLARTON AND CO., 1843. 

The name of " Gray & Son " is removed from the plate. 

Curiosities of Great Britain. England and Wales 
delineated. By T. Dugdale, [1843]. 8vo. 

Sir H, G. Fordham states that a copy of this work was probably 
issued in 1843. 

For description of the map of Wiltshire see under date 1858, as I have 
seen no earlier edition. 

1845 
Another reprint of the Map drawn by R Creighton, 
1831 

In ATLAS TO THE TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND 
AND WALES . . . LONDON : PUBLISHED BY S. LEWIS AND 
CO., 13, FINSBURY PLACE, SOUTH, 1845. 4fcO. 






By T. Cknhh. 283 

A further reprint of the Map engraved by S. Hall 
in 1832. 

In A TRAVELLING COUxNTY ATLAS ... BY SIDNEY HALL. 
LONDON: CHAPMAN AND HALL, STRAND, 1845. 8vo. 

With the roads coloured brown, the parks green, and the railways blue, 

Wiltshire scale of miles, 10 [ 2". inclies]. Drawn by 
r. P. Becker & Co., 12, Paternoster Row. 
Engraved on steel by the Omnigraph F. P. 
Becker & Co. Patentees Fisher, Son, & Co., 
London & Paris. 10i;in. x ISJiii. 

In fisher's county atlas of ENGLAND AND AVALES . . , 
FISHER, SON & CO. . . . LONDON, [1844-45]. 

A hill-shaded map with the main roads given very prominently. 
Shows towns, villages, parks, woods, canals, rivers, railways, election 
and polling places. The county is divided by an engraved line into 
" Northern Division & Southern Division." The main roads are carried 
to the border of the map. The distances from London are given at the 
principal towns, and also from town to town along the roads. 

Top left-hand corner, the title with the scale immediately below, 
followed by "Tiie County of Wiltshire returns 4 members to Parliament 
for the county & 14 for 9 boroughs," and the signs used on the map. 
Bottom left-hand corner, " Detached Parts of Wiltshire locally situate 
in Berkshire." Top right-hand corner, " Places of Election. Polling 
Places." Bottom right-hand corner, a note showing boroughs returning 
two members. 

The geography of the county cuts through the border in two places at 
the bottom. Outside the border, at the bottom, on the left, the name of 
the draughtsman ; and, on tlie right, that of the engraver. In the middle, 
the imprint. 

The border is formed by two fine lines with an intermediate thick one, 
and a double iimer line marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude 
and longitude. 

1847. 
I reprint of the map engraved by S. Hall, 1832. 

./// A NKW COrNTV .\TI.AS : Willi ALL TIIK COACH ANh KAIL 
iiOADS ACCri; ATKl.V LAili DOWN AND ( 'OLOf l.'F.I >. CAIiKHLLV 
<'()KI{KCTKI) TO Tin: KNh oj TIIL SKSSjuN (M' ISIG. KN<ii;AVKI» 
I'.V S, HALL. LONDON: (JIAI'MAN AND 1 1 ALL, S lU A N D, 1SI7. -ito. 

I I'^roiii ,'i copy of tli(> \\\\\^ in tlio l' iiivcrsit y Lil)r;irv, Caiuhiidge. 

'"'• WWII. Ni) ( \\ 1. V 



284 Marps of Wiltshire. 

Wiltshire. English miles, 6 [=.4 inch]. 6|in. x SJin. 
In Johnson's atla.s of England . . . Manchester, pub- 
lished BY THOS. JOHNSON, 1847. 8vo. 

A coarsely-drawn map, showing towns, principal villages, hills, parks, 
hundreds (not named), canals, rivers, main roads, and (more finely 
marked) cross roads ; also the railways from London to Bath and the 
branch from Swindon to Gloucester. 

Top left-hand corner, a panel of plain lines enclosing a smaller panel 
with bevelled corners, which contains the title, " Wiltshire." A little 
below, " Pt. of Wilts in Berks." Bottom left-hand corner, the scale, 
and, below this, "Bail way Stations marked thus +." Top right-hand 
corner, a lozenge-shaped shield, bearing the common seal of the town of 
Wilton. 

The border is formed by two lines close together, and a double inner 
line, marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude, 
the space between the two being ornamented. It is broken at the 
bottom by the detail of the map. 

1848. 

Dorsetshire, Somersetshire, and South Wiltshire. 
Drawn & eng^raved by John Emslie. English 
miles, 16 [=1^ inches] Published by J. Reynolds, 
174, Strand. (Grloucestershire and North Wilt- 
shire.) 

In REYNOLD 'S TRAVELLING ATLAS OF ENGLAND . . . LONDON : 

SIMPKINS, MARSHALL & CO. . . . 1848. 8vo. Plates 11 
and 14. 

North Wilts is engraved with Gloucestershire and South Wilts with 
Dorset and Somerset 

The chief feature of the maps is the roads. Towns are also shown 
and the principal villages, parks, and the railways from London to Bath, 
with branch from Swindon to Gloucester ; and the Salisbury and South- 
ampton line. 

The borders of the maps are formed by two lines close together and a 
fine inner line. 

Wiltshire. Scale of miles, 10 [=1^^ inches]. London. 
Published for the Proprietors by H. Cr. Collins, 
22, Paternoster Row. 5fin. x VJin. 

In THE TRAVELLING ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES . . . 
LONDON. PUBLISHED ... BY HENRY GEORGE COLLINS, 22, 
PATERNOSTER ROW, [1848] . 8vo. 



By T. Chnhh. 285 

A clearly engraved map showing towns, principal villages, parks 
(coloured green), canals, rivers, railways, and main roads. 

Top left-hand corner, panel with title. Bottom left-hand corner, the 
scale. Top right-hand corner, a small star indicator of the points of the 
compass. At the botton], outside the border, the imprint. 

The border is formed by two thin lines, with an intermediate thick one. 

Wiltshire. By J. & C. Walker. English miles, 10 
{-^^l inches]. Published by Longman, Rees, Orme, 
Brown, & Co., Paternoster K»ow. 12;^ii). x lo^in. 

In IIUBSON'S l'OX-ilUN'l']N(; ATLAS ... OF EVEKY COUNTY 
IN ENGLAND . . . ]JY ,). & G. WALKER. LONDON : PUBLISHED 
BY J. & G. WALKER, 0, CASTLE STREET, HOLBOKN, [1848]. fol. 

A re-issue of Walker's map, probably first published about 1835, pre- 
pared for llohson's Foxhunting Atlas. Shows towns, villages, parks, 
hills, canals, rivers, and roads; and, superimposed, are the hunting 
districts and the places of meetings. The railways have also been added. 
The distances of the chief towns from London are given. The roads and 
railways run up to, and in some cases over, the border of the map. 

Top left-hand corner, in a double-lined panel, bevelled at the corners, 
the title; immediately below, " Jiy J. &. C. Walker," followed by the 
scale, and some county statistics. An addition has been made, between 
the author's name and the scale, of " Places of meeting of Foxhounds." 
Bottom left-hand corner, "Places of Election," and " Polling Places." 
Top right-hand corner, an inset, with border, containing " Detached parts 
of Wiltshire locally situated in Berkshire." Immediately below, a star 
compass indicator with ornamental northern point. On the right-hand 
side, a little below the middle, " Reference to the Divisions established 
at the Quarter Sessions in 1830." Bottom right-hand corner, a list of 
" Boroughs returning 2 members each," below the border, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, with a 
double inner line, marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
longitude. 

Post Office Map of Wiltshire 1848 Scale of miles, 

8 [ = 15 inches] Drawn &; engraved by F Becker 
& Co., 11, Stationers' Court, City. Kelly & Co., 
Post Office Directory Offices, 19 & 20, Old Bos^ 
well Court, Temple Bar S.in. x 1 1 [in 

/// rosT oi'KKK i>ii;k( r()i;v ok iia.mi'siiikk, dokskt.shh;!.:, w h t- 

SIIIKK. IIIK MAI'S K.\(.1;A\K1) MX I'll KSS1,V K( )in'l I K \V(i|;K. LONDON : 
IMMNTKI) AM) ITI'.l.ls 1 1 Kl ) \\\ \\ KKLLY ,S.' ( ()., 10 \ I'D, OLD HOS- 

WKi-i. (Diirr. TKMn.K i;ai;. 1S4vS. Sxo. 

.\ hill sliadcil liiap, sliuwiiii; towns, xillagt's, hiimhls, paiks, i-jiiials, 
riviTs, hills, ciiinps, pailiameiitury tlivisJDns, post-ollices, aiul ruilwjiys. 



286 Maps of Wiltshire. 

The railways from London to Bath, with a branch from Swindon to 
Gloucester, and the line from Salisbury to Southampton, are given as 
finished ; but the lines from Andover to Salisbury, and Salisbury via 
Westbury to Chippenham, with branches to Devizes and Frome, are 
shown as proposed lines. The Hungerford and Beading line is given as 
finished as far as Marlborough ; it is incorrectly shown as a straight line 
from Hungerford to Marlborough, instead of some three miles south of 
Marlborough, and in a direct line with Devizes. The roads and railways 
run up to the border on all sides. 

Top left-hand corner, the title, date, and scale ; and immediately below, 
some statistics of Wiltshire. Bottom left-hand corner, the " Eeferences 
to the Divisions." Top right-hand corner, a plain cross with a star (*) 
at the northern point. On the right-hand side, a little below the middle, 
a list giving the number of members returned to Parliament. 

Below the border, in the right-hand corner, the engraver's name, and, 
in the middle, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick outer and a fine inner line. 

1849. 

Another edition of the map engfraved by R. Creigh- 
ton in 1831. 

In A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND BY S. LEWIS. 
1849. 4«. 

1850. 

Dugdale's Curiosities of G-reat Britain. 

Sir H. G. Fordham states that probably an edition of this atlas 
was published in 1850. 

1852. 

Another edition of the map issued in The Travell- 
ing Atlas of England and Wales, by H. G-. Collins, 

[1848]. 

In THE TRAVELLING ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES . . . 
LONDON : PUBLISHED . . . BY W. S. ORR & CO., 2, AMEN CORNER, 
PATERNOSTER ROW, [1852.]. 8vo. 

With numerous alterations. 

The Gloucester branch of the Great Western Railway is placed further 
north, and the words " Fr. Gloucester " substituted for " Cheltenham and 
Great Western Union Railway." The branch line from Westbury to 
Frome is added. The line indicating the railway from Salisbury toi 
Warminster is erased. Probably when drawn, in 1848, it was only in- 
tended to show a proposed railway. 



By T. Chuhh. 287 

The Salisbury and Southampton Railway is correctly shown as running 
south (instead of north) of Clarendon Park, and the words '* To South- 
ampton " added, near the line. 

The whole detail of the plate is carried one-sixteenth of an inch liigher, 
so that the point of the compass indicator just breaks into the border line 
at the top, instead of being one-sixteonth of an inch below, as in the 1848 
edition. The imprint now reads " London : Published ... by 
W. S. Orr & Co. 2, Amen Corner, Paternoster Row." 

The British Gazetteer. Wiltshire. Scale, 8 miles [=^ 
2J inches ]. I.ondon. Published for the Proprietors 
by H. G. Collins, 22, Paternoster Row. 16J,in. x 
13iin. 

In AN ATLAS ACCOMPANYING THE BUITISII GAZETTEER 1)Y BEN- 
JAMIN CLAKKE, 1852. fol. 

Coloured in divisions. Shows towns, villages, parks, woods, camps, 
hundreds (with reference numbers), canals, rivers, the number of mem- 
bers returned to Parliament, places of county election, poUing places, 
railways, main and bye roads, the distances of the principal towns from 
London, and from town to town. 

Top left-hand corner, a star indicator of the points of the compass, and, 
a little below, a detached part of Wiltshire. At bottom left-hand corner, 
the "Explanation" of signs used, and, to the right, the scale. Top 
right-hand corner, " Wiltshire " in a long panel, upon which rests a scroll 
containing "The British Gazetteer." Below the title, a note referring 
to the members of Parliament. Bottom right-hand corner, " Reference 
to the Hundreds." Between the border lines, at the bottom, " Longitude 
west from Greenwich" ; and, below the border, the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line between two thin ones, with an 
inner double line, divided off into degrees and minutes of latitude and 
I longitude. The outside border lines are decorated with scroll work at 
the angles, sides, top, and bottom. 

'Wiltshire. [Scale, 1 inch =35 miles.] 2|in. x ''in. 

hi COLLINS' I'OCKET ORDNANCE KAILAVAY ATLAS OF GKEAT 

r.UI'l'AIN. II. (1. COLLINS, 22, PATEUNOSTEIl ROW, LONDON, [1852]. 

Svo. 
A small map extending from the Dorsetshire Coast to the City of 

Gloucester and from Wells to Reading. The County of Wilts, coloured 

blue, in tlic middle of the map ; its boundary is sliown by an engraved 

lino. 
1 Shows only towns, hills, rivers, and liie I'aihvays from Swindon to 

Batlh with branches to Gloucester and Prome, and from Salisbury to 

Southampton. 
1 The l)i)rd(>r is foi-nird by two line lines ; tlu- title '" Wiltsliitc " bcini,' 

outside at ihu lop, and, inuucdiiitoly below, the nunibei' '27. 



288 Maps of Wiltshire. ^ 

1853 

A re-issue of the one-inch Ordnance Survey. 

The sheets bearing the original dates, 1811 — 17, but^the following 
railways are added : London to Bath, Swindon to Gloucester, Chippen- 
ham to Westbury, and Salisbury to Southampton. 

1855. 

Another edition, dated 1855, of the map engraved 
by r. P. Becker & Co., 1848. 

Ill POST OFFICE DmECTORY OF HAMPSHIRE, WILTSHIRE AND 
DORSETSHIRE, 1855. 

This edition shows the railway completed between Chippenham and 
Warminster, with branches to Bradford and Frome. The line from 
Hungerford to Marlborough, shown in the 1848 map is erased. 

Cruchley's Railway Map of Wiltshire, showing all 
the Hallways and names of Stations, also the 
Telegraph lines and Stations. Improved from 
the Ordnance Survey. This map may be had 
geologically coloured. Price 3/6 in sheets. Lon- 
don. Published by Cr. P. Cruchley, Map-seller & 
Globe maker, 81, Pleet Street. January 1st, 
1855. Scale, 8 miles [=2| inches]. 19iin. x 21Jin. 

A reprint of Gary's Map of 1801, as altered by William Smith in 1819. 
The railways are added to the plate ; also, just below the middle on the 
left-hand side, " Explanation " of signs used. Gary's name and title have 
been replaced by those of Gruchley. The imprint, below the border, has 
been erased. 

Another copy of the above map, geologically col- 
oured. 

In THE WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 
society's magazine, JUNE, 1858. 

1856. 

Geological Survey. 

Sheets 14, 15, and 34 of the one-inch Ordnance Survey, geologically 
coloured, were issued in 1856 — 57, by the Geological Survey. Sheet 15 
was published in 1856, 14 and 34 in 1857. 



/;,// T. ChnhlK 289 

1857. 

Another edition of the map engraved by Pigot and 
Son, 1838. 

In .1. slater's new BIUTISFl ATLAS COMPRLSING THE COUNTIES 
OF ENGLAND ... J. SLATER, IMMXTKll, FOUNTAIN STREET, MAN- 
CHESTER, [1857]. 

New railways are added from Salisbury to Romsey, Chippenliam to 
Frome, and Bath to Devizes. The imprint now runs " PubHshed by 
J. Slater, Fleet Street, London, and Fountain Street, Manchester." 

1858. 

Another edition of the map engraved by J. Roper, 
1809. 

In COLLINS' RAILWAY AND PEDESTRIAN ATLAS OF ENGLAND 
. . . LONDON : DARTON & CO., 58, II0LI50RN HILL, [1858.]. 

A very poor and faint impression. The plate has been rubbed down 
to remove the hill-shading, and, in so doing, the roads have been ahnost 
obliterated. In many instances they appear only as rough single lines. 
The Kennett Canal, too, has been almost rubbed out. The inscription 
"drawn and engraved under the direction of J.Britton " has been removed 
from the border lines at the bottom, and also all the information below 
the border. Railways added to the plate are : the Great Western line 
from London to Bath, with branches to Gloucester, Devizes, Bradford, 
Frome, and Salisbury ; the South-Western Railway, from London to 
Exeter, and the Salisbury-Southampton line. 

Wiltshire. Scale, 10 miles [-"^IJ inches]. Drawn and 
engraved by J. Archer, Pentonville, London. 

Tin. X Oliii. 

/// CURIOSI'l'lKS OF GRKAT LRITAIN. ENGLAND AND WAL?":S 
DELLNKATKD , . . P.V TllOALVS DUGDALE, [1854 — 18G0]. 8vo. 

A hill-shaded map with Parliamentary divisions coloured, showing 
towns, villages, hills, parks, woods, canals, rivers, main and cross roads : 
also the railways from London to I^ath, with branches from Swindon to 
Gloucester, ;iii(l from Corshani to Salisbury, witli a branch line going oil" 
at Wcstbuiy lor l-'roiuo, and the Salisbury to Soulhamptt)n line. A 
reprint of an eariiei- map, as tli(> railways are not up to date. 

Top left hand corner, tlu> title; just below, tilt scale ; and, near the 
l)oiilei-, ;•. hllle lower, a dctaclicd part of W'ihshiic. 1 Jot toni left ■ hand 
corner, a list of the I'arlianu'Utary iii\ isions. Top right hand corner, an 
inset plan, with a single-lin(> hordei-, of " Part of Wiltshire in Herkshire." 
Lower half of Ihc nia|). on the riijit han.j ^i<le, " Mxplanat ion " of the 



290 Maps of Wiltshire. 

signs used. Below the border, in the right-hand corner, the engraver's 
name. Between the border lines, at the bottom, "Longitude West." 

The border is formed by two fine lines with an intermediate thick one, 
with a double inner line marked off into degrees and minutes of latitude 
and longitude. 

This edition was first published in monthly parts ; the map of Wiltshire 
being issued in part 48, and bearing the British Museum date of "27 
Mr. 58." 

As noted by Sir H. G. Fordham, editions of Thomas Dugdale's England 
and Wales Delineated, with maps engraved by J. Archer, were published 
in 1840, 1856, and 1860. 



1859. 

A further reprint, dated 1859, of the map engraved 
by F. F. Becker & Co., 1848. 

In POST OFFICE DIRECTORY OF HAMPSHIRE, WILTSHIRE, ETC" 
1859. 8vo. 

All the railways projected in the 1848 map shown as complete, with 
the addition of the railway from Salisbury to Exeter. 

1860 

A reprint, geologically coloured, of the map en| 
graved by J. Emslie, 1848. 

In REYNOLDS' GEOLOGICAL ATLAS OF GREAT BRITAIN . . 
LONDON, 1860. 8vo. 

Additional railways shown are, from near Corsham to Salisbury, via 
Melksham, Westbury, and Warminster, with a branch to Devizes, and 
a loop line from Trowbridge to Bath, also the South Western Railway, 
London to Exeter. 

A further reprint of the map engraved by S. Hall, 
4.832. 

In A TRAVELLING ATLAS OF THE ENGLISH COUNTIES BY SIDNEY 
HALL. [I860.] 8vo. 

Showing the London and South Western Railway, London to Exeter 
via Salisbury. At the termination, near the county boundary, of the 
Salisbury to Southampton line, " Salisbury and South Western Railway" f* 
has been added. Top right-hand corner, between the border lines, the j 
number " 40 " has also been added. 



L 



« Bij T. Chvhh. 291 

VlTiltshire. Engraved by S. Hall. English miles, 10 

[ = 2J inches], 12iiii. x 16in. 

In TIIK ENGLISH COUNTIES BY SIDNEY HALL . . . LONDON : 
CHAI'MAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY, [I860]. fol. 

An enlarged reproduction of S. Hall's map of Wiltshire, 1832, first 
issued in A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain . . . hy 
John Gorton, 1833, and re-issued in A New British Atlas in 1830. 

1862 

Inother edition of the One-inch Ordnance Survey. 

Sheets 14, 15, and 34, printed from an electrotype, wer^ re-issued in 
1862, but still bearing the original dates of 1811 — 17. The railways 
are brought up to date, including additional lines from Hungerford, 
vi((, Pewsey and Devizes, to the Great Western main line at Holt 
Junction; the continuation of the branch from Westbury to Frome ; 
and tlie South Western main line, London, via Salisbury, to Exeter. 

another edition of J. & C. Walker's Map, probably 
first issued about 1835, and published in Hob- 
son's Fox-Hunting Atlas in 1848. 

Ill BPJTISII ATLAS COMPRISING SEPARATE MAPS OF EVERY 
COUNTY IN ENGLAND . . . BY J. & C. WALKER. PUBLISHED BY 
LONGMAN, REES & CO., PATERNOSTER ROW, AND J. & C. WALKER, 
9, CASTLE STREET, IIOLBORN. 1862. fol. 

In this edition the information referring to foxhunting is omitted. 
Probably the copy in Hobson's atlas was specially prepared for that work. 
Political boundaries of the boroughs are shown by a blue line over the 
engraved one. The Great Western Kailway from Hungerford to Devizes 
and the South W^estern from Salisbury to Exeter are added. 

Iriltshire. By Edwd- Weller. English miles 8 
[='2!, iiuhos] George Philip & Son, London and 
Liverpool, lojin. x \(j!.\n. 

\cvy siniihii' to Edward WcUer's map issued in Cassdfs British Atlas, 
18t3L. Shows the towns, villages, hamlets, parks, hills, woods, canals, 
rivers, roads, and railways. The Northern Division is coloured pink and 
llie Southern Division groon. The detail i uiis into the border in three 
places, at the top; and through, and below, the border at the bottom. 
The railways and roads are carried to tlie borders at the sides, and the 
I chief towns, in the ;uijoininL( counties, are gi\-en. 

Top lefl-hiind coiner, the title, the author's name, the scab-, and the 
indications of the railways and loads. 'I'lie impiinl is l)r]ow tlio border, 
at tlie bottom. The border is formed hy two line lines with an intei-- 
mediate thick one, and a single jiiu> one eighth of an inch insiih'. 

XX.Wll. -NO. 1 Wl. 



292 Maps of Wiltshire. ^ 

Wiltshire. Scale of statute miles, 10 [=f inch], 
London. Published by Gr. Cruchley, Map Seller 
& Globe Maker, 81, Fleet Street. 3fin. x 4fin. 

In CRUCHLEY'S EAILROAD companion to ENGLAND & WALES. 
. . . G. F. CRUCHLEY . . . LONDON, [1862]. 8vo. M 

A lithographic reproduction of Gary's plate of 1789, with considerable 
alterations. The band bearing the title, and the half star indicator of 
the pomts of the compass, in the top border, are removed and the border- 
lines carried one-sixteenth of an inch higher ; the title being above the 
border. The information at the bottom of the plate is also obliterated, 
and the border lines brought five-sixteenths of an inch nearer the county 
boundary. The plate is one-eighth of an inch wider ; and the imprint 
is below the border. 

Many of the names on the plate have been re-engraved. The railways 
from London to Bath are shown, with branches to Gloucester, Salisbury, 
and Devizes, with a line connecting Bath and Salisbury, and another 
branch from Westbury to Frome ; also the South Western lines, London 
to Exeter and Salisbury to Southampton ; and a proposed line from 
Hungerford to Devizes. The plate is numbered 38 in the right-hand top 
corner. 

1863. 

Railway and Station Map of Wiltshire, with the 
names of the Stations. Scale of miles, 5 [^f inch] 
London. Published by Cr. F. Cruchley, Map I 
seller & Globe maker. Fleet Street. 8fin. x lOlin. 

In CRUCHLEY'S COUNTY ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES • ■ • i 
PUBLISHED BY G. F, CRUCHLEY . . . 1863. 8vo. | 

A lithographic reproduction of Gary's Map of Wiltshire, 1787 ; but with { 
so many alterations that it is hardly recognisable at first sight. The ' 
original title, too, is replaced by that given above. 

Top right-hand corner, " Explanation " of the signs for the railways 
and stations has been added, and, immediately below, the scale of 5 miles. ^ 
In the original map a scale of 10 miles was placed below the title in the 
bottom left-hand corner. The top border is lowered by three-eighths of 
an inch, so that the detail runs into the border; and the bottom 
border is brought up three-eighths of an inch,near to the county boundary. 
At Cranbourne Chase, trees are now sliown, and the hills are shaded 
throughout the map. 

The railways shown are : London to Bath, with branches to Gloucester^ 
and Salisbury. A branch from the Salisbury line, at Westbury, fori 
Frome ; Hungerford, via Devizes and Bradford, to Bath ; and the South! 
Western lines from London to Exeter, and Salisbury to Southampton. | 



By T. Chithh. 293 

! 1864. 

Another copy, geologically coloured, of the map 
engraved by John Emslie in 1848. 

/ytUEYNULlJ.s' (JKOLOdlCAL ATLAS OF(;i;KAT lUilTAl^', [1864]. 8vo. 

A.nother edition of the map engraved by John 
Emslie in 1848. 

Ill I'OKTAIU.E ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND AVALES . . . LONDON. 
JAMES REYNOLDS, 174, STlfAND, W.(J. [1864]. 8vo. 

In this edition the railway from Hungerford to Devizes is added; the 
hills are etched on the plate, the two outside border lines are removed, 
leaving a single line border, the plate numbers (11 and ]4) are placed 
inside the border line, and the engraver's name and imprint removed. 

W'iltshire. By Edwd. Weller, F.R.G.S. Scale, 

British miles, 6 [= 1^ miles]. London. Published 

by Cassell, Fetter, & G-alpin, La Belle Sauvage 

Yard, Ludgate Hill, EC. 12hi. x iTiii. 

[)i casskll's iu;i iisii atlas consisting of the counties of 

ENCLANl) . . . LONDON: CASSELL, TETTER, AND GALPIN, [1864]. 
fol. 

A copy of the map of Wiltshire published in the Weekh/ BUpatch^ 
probably in 1860. Many of the maps, including that of Wiltshire, are 
missing from the copy of the DUixitck in the British Museum. 

A very clearly engraved map, hill shaded, and showing towns, villages, 
hamlets, historical remains, parks, woods, canals, rivers, roads, and 
railways. The railways shown are: the Great Western system, London 
to Bath, with branches from Swindon to Gloucester, Chippenham to 
Calne ; the Wilts and Somerset line, via Melksham, Trowbridge, 
Westbury, and Frome; the branch from Westbury to Salisbury, with a 
comiecLing line, via Bradford, between Bath and Trowbridge ; the line 
from Hungerford to Devizes and thence to the Wilts and Somerset 
branch, a little south of Melksham, with a branch line to i\Iarlborough ; 
and the South Western system, from Andover to Exeter, and from 
Salisbury to Southampton. 

Top left-hand corner, the title, author's name, scale, and an historical 
note. Top right-hand corner, " Parliamentary Representation," printed 
vertically. Bottom half of the plate, on right-hand side, two columns of 
statistical notes, printed vertically. 

The county boundary just reaches the border at the top; at the 
righlhand side; and at the bottom it runs into the middle of the border. 

The border is formed by two thin lines with an intermediate ihirk one, 
and a double inner line marked off into degree's and iniiuiirs i.f l.ititude 
and lonijituile. 



294 Mci'ps of Wiltshire. 

1865. 
Another edition of the map engraved by J. Archer, 
1858. 

In A REPRINT OF THOMAS DUGDALE's ENGLAND AND WALES 
DELINEATED. [1865]. 

With the Parliamentary divisions coloured in outline, and the railway 
from Andover to Salisbury added. 

1867. 
Another reprint, dated 1867, of the map of Wilt- 
shire engraved by F. F. Becker & Co., 1848. 

In POST OFFICE DIRECTORY OF DORSETSHIRE, WILTSHIRE ... 
BY E. KELLY, ETC. 1867. 

In this edition the railway is continued from Hungerford to Devizes, 
with a branch line to Marlborough. This latter is probably a proposed 
line. It runs between the main road and Savernake Forest. A branch 
line from Chippenham to Calne is also added, and a short branch from 
Broughton Gifford, near Melksham, to Bradford. 

1868. 

Another edition of the map published in Collins' 
Travelling^ Atlas, 1848, and re-issued in 1852 
by W. S. Orr & Co. 

In THE TRAVELLING ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES . . . 
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY JOHN HEYWOOD, 141 & 143, DEANS- | 
GATE, MANCHESTER, [1868]. (JOHN HEYWOOD'S COUNTY ATLAS ! 
OF ENGLAND AND WALES, ETC.) 

Considerable alterations are seen in this edition. A number of names, | 
which are quite easy to distinguish, are added ; and additional railways: 
Chippenham to Calne, Hungerford, via Devizes, to Bath, with a branch 
to Marlborough ; Warminster to Salisbury, and the South Western line, [ 
London to Exeter, and Salisbury to Fordingbridge. Vertical shading is j 
added around the band bearing the title, and the form of border isj 
altered to a thick line with shading inside. The imprint is removed! 
from the bottom of the plate. 

A reprint of the map in Crucliley's County Atlasj 
of England & Wales, 1863. 

In CRUCHLEY'S county atlas of ENGLAND AND WALES . 
LONDON, [1868]. 8vo. 
The title is altered and now reads : " Wiltshire." The scale, in the 



By T. Ckiihh. 295 

right-hand top corner, is placed higher up and is now in latitude 51" 36', 
instead of 51" 34', The explanation of railway signs, in the top right- 
hand corner, is erased, and new railways shown : from the Great Western 
main line to Faringdon ; a proposed line from Wootton Bassett to 
Malmesbury and beyond ; a new branch from Chippenham to Calne : a 
projected line from the South Western main line, near Purton, north-west 
to Tetbury, with a junction with the Ilungerford line near Pewsey ; and 
a line from Salisbury to Fordingbridge. 

Wiltshire. English miles, 8 [=1J inches]. By W, 

Hugfhes. Vl\\\. X 9.1 in. 

In THE NATIONAL (lAZETTKKlt . . . OF GI.'EAT BRITAIN AND 
lUELANU. BY N. E. S. A. HAMILTON, LONDON, 1868. 8vo. 

A very clearly printed map, coloured in light brown, showing the 
villages, hamlets, parks, woods, hills, canals, rivers, roads, and railways, 
the last being indicated by a broken line. The roads, railways, and 
principal towns are shown to the margin of the map. 

Top left-hand corner, the title ; and, below, the scale of 8 miles. Bottom 
right-hand corner, below the border, " W. Hughes." 

The border is formed by a thick line with a fine inner line, a space of 
three-sixteenths of an inch, and a double inner line. The latitude and 
longitude are shown in figures, and lines cross the border, at every ten 
minutes. 

1869. 

Wiltshire. Drawn & engraved by J. Bartholomew, 
Edinr. Scale of miles, 8 [=2 inclies]. (Houlston & 
Sons' new series of District Handy Maps from 
the Ordnance Survey. Wiltshire 65, 

Paternoster Row, B.C.) lOin x 4iin. 

A clearly printed map, with the detail reaching to the border lines. 
The county boundary is shown by a fine dotted line, and the county of 
Wilts is coloured a light biown. The title "Wiltshire" is in the middle 
of the top border. In the bottom border the scale appears in the 
middle, and in the right-hand corner, the draughtsman's luime. 

The title iii parentheses is given on the cover in which the map was 
issued. 

lleproduced from the one-inch Ordnance Surxcy aiul showing most of 
its details. 

The border is formed 1),\ two ihin lines with an intennciiiatr tliick one, 
a space of one-eighth of an inch, and a line iinier line. 

1870. 

A reprint of the Map of Wiltshire by J. &; C. 
Walker, 1862. 



296 Maps of Wiltshire. 

In THE BRITISH ATLAS . . . BY " J. & C. WALKER . . . 
LO^^DON . . . 1870. 

The changes are the addition of the new railways ; Chippenham to 
Calne ; a branch from the Hungerford line to Marlborough ; a branch 
from the Salisbury — Southampton line to Fordingbridge ; and the 
colouring of the Parliamentary divisions. 

Some of the maps in this edition have the imprint of J. & C. Walker 
substituted for that of Longman, Orme, Rees & Co, 

1872. 
All unaltered reprint of the 1868 edition of the 
Map of Wiltshire, first issued in Cruchley's 
County Atlas of England, 1863. 

In chuchley's new pocket companion, or handmaid to 

BRADSHAW . . . FOR ENGLAND AND AVALES, IN FOUR 
divisions . . . CRUCHLEY . . . 81, FLEET STREET, 
LONDON, [1872]. 

Wiltshire. English miles, 6 [=f inch]. George Philip 
& Son, London and Southampton. (Philips' 
Educational Series of County Maps). 6m. x Sin. 

In THE GEOGRAPHY OF WILTSHIRE ... BY REV. J. P. 
FAUNTHORPE . . . LONDON: GEORGE PHILIP & SON. 1872. 

.8vo. 

A clearly printed map, the Northern division being coloured pink and 
the Southern division green. Show^s tow^ns, villages, hills, canals, rivers, 
roads, and railways. 

Top left-hand corner, the title, and, immediately below, the scale, and 
beneath this, the " Parliamentary Divisions. 1 North. 2 South" ; and 
the signs for the " Kailways, Roads, Canals." The railways, roads, and 
towns reach to the border, into which the map breaks at the top and 
bottom. 

Outside the border line, at the top, is the sub-title ; and at the bottom, 
the imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line with a fine inner line one-eighth 
of an inch distant. The latitude and longitude are indicated every ten 
minutes by a short line ; and at every thirty minutes are expressed by 
figures and a line across the border. 

1873. 

A reprint of Philips' Map of Wiltshire, issued in 
The Geography of Wiltshire, by Rev. J. P« 
Faunthorpe, 1872. 



By T. Chvhh. 297 

In PIIIIvlPS' HANDY ATLAS OF TIIK COUNTIES OF F:XGLAND. 
BY JOHN IJARTHOLOjMEW . . . LONDON : OEOIKIE PHILIP & 

SON . . . 187:'>. 

With tlie railway from tlie Great Western main line to Farinj^don added. 

A reprint of the Map by W. Hughes, 1868. 

In A NEW COUNTV ATLAS OF (iliKAT LiMTAIN AND TI.'KLAND 
. . . liY W. HUCHES . . . LONDON, VIKTUE & CO., [] 873]. 
fol. 

In this edition the North is coloured green and the South pink; the 
railways from Chippenham to Calne, Savernake to Marlborough, and 
Salisbury to Fordingbridge are added ; and, outside the county boundary, 
a line is shown from Andover to llomsey. 

Top left-hand corner, " Heights in feet" has been added; and, at the 
bottom, half an inch below the border, "London : Virtue & Co." 

Another edition of the One-inch Ordnance Survey. 

In 1B73, a reprint of the 1853 issue of the the One-inch Ordnance 
Survey was issued as an Index to the Tithe Survey, 

With the one addition of the boundary lines referring to the Tithe 
Survey. 

1875. 
A further reprint, dated 1875, of the map engraved 
by F. P. Becker & Co., for Kelly's Directory, 1848. 

/// Til K I'OS'L' OFFICE DIUECTOKY OF HAMPSITIKF . . . WILT- 

siiiiiE, ETC., 1875. 8vo. 

The engraver's name and address are removed, and the imprint altered 

to "Kelly !k Co., Post Office Directory Offices, 51, Gt. Queen Street, 

Lincolns Inn Fields, W.C." The railway to Marlborough is corrected, 

and shown as running between the two roads leading to Marlborough 

■ from th(> South ; and a new line runs from Salisbury to Fordingbridge, 

A copy of the "Post Office Directory Map," 1875. 

/// <orNT^- lOI'ncK'Al'lllKS. \\- 1 1.TSll I K K . . . KDITKD 1;V K. 
i;. KKl.l.V . . . l.iJ.NDON : I'lMNTKH AND i'ClM.lsll Kl • F.V KFI.l.V 
AND CO. . . . 187"). Svo. 

flL reprint of E. Weller's Map, 1862. 

/// rilll.M's' ATI.AS ol- TIIK (OINTIFS OF FNCFAND F.V FDWAIJD 
WFI.FFi; . . . LONDON, IST''. I't'l. 
'I'liis c, ill ion is (M)l(.urcil in DarliaiiifuLarv Divisions and rnMt>uj^hs ; jind 



298 Mciffi of Wiltshire. 

the sides, reference numbers 1 — 6 are added, and, at the top and bottom, 
between the border Hnes, A to G. Additional railways are shown: 
Chippenham to Calne, the Marlborough branch, Salisbury to Fording- 
bridge, and Andover to Komsey. 

A further reprint of the 1868 edition of the map 
issued in Cruchley's County Atlas of England 
and Wales . . . 1863. 

In cruchley's county atlas of ENGLAND & WALES, LONDON, 

1875. 8vo. 

A proposed railway from Marlborough to Swindon is shown in this 
edition, but the projected lines from Wootton Bassett to Malmesbury, and 
from Salisbury {via Amesbury) through the middle of the county to 
Tetbury, are omitted. This impression has the imprint of Cruchley, 
as in the 1863 edition, but in larger type. 

1876. 

A further reprint of Philips' Map issued in the 
G-eography of Wiltshire ... by Rev. J. P. 
Faunthorpe . . . 1872. 

In philips' handy atlas of THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND . . . 

1876. 8vo. 

With the addition of the lines of latitude and longitude, which cross 
the map at every ten minutes. 

Another edition of the Map published in the 
Weekhj Dispatch, in 1862, and reproduced in 
Cassell's British Atlas in 1864. 

In bacon's new QUARTO COUNTY ATLAS ... OF ENGLAND 
AND WALES . . . LONDON, G. W. BACON & CO., [1876]. 4to. 

With Parliamentary Divisions and Boroughs coloured. 

The note, under the title to the 1864 edition, is differently set up ; and 
those on the right-hand side have been removed. A note of four lines, 
referring to railways, has been added in the top right-hand corner, and 
also references to the boundaries. The railway from Salisbury to 
Fordingbridge is added ; Cassell's imprint is erased, and " Gr. W. Bacon 
& Co., 127, Strand, London," added. 

1877. 

Wiltshire. English miles, 5 [=f inch]. William Collins, 
Son, & Co., London & Crlasgow. 



Bii T. Cliuhh. 299 

In ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALKS . . . LONDON. WILLLVM 
COLLINS, SON & COMPANY, [1877]. 8vo. 

Shows the towns, principal villages, hills, canals, rivers, roads, and 
railways, The roads and railwiiys reach to the borders, into which the 
detail runs in two places at the bottom. 

Top left-hand corner, the title, the scale, sif,ms for canals, railways, and 
roads; and a nolo of the political divisions, lielow the border, the 
imprint. 

The border is formed by a thick line with a fine iimer line one-eighth 
of an inch distant. 

1885. 

Ordnance Survey of Wiltshire. Scale, 25 inches 
to one mile. 

The 25-inch Ordnance Survey was begun in 1873, and completed in 
1885. It occupies about one thousand sheets, each of which was pub- 
lished about two years after the survey. Size of sheets 38in. X SS^in. 

This survey was reduced to the scale of six inches to the mile, and 
published, in 1877—1890, in eighty-two sheets, measuring 36in.x24|in. 



ADiJENUA. 



1627. 

Wilt Shire. Scala miliari, 10 [ A inch]. 

Ill ENCI.ANl), WALKS, SCOTLAND, AND IIIKLAND DKSCKIliKD 
AND AlllMlxiKI) WITH V'' II iSToK 1 K KKI.ATION Ol" 'I'll I N( is WOK Tl 1 V 
MK.MOKV FKo.M A V \\\\\ LAIIOKU VolLl'MK [x/r] DONK I'.V JOHN 
Sl'KKD. ANNO. OUM I'KIVJLKCK). 1 G-!7. Obi. 1 I^IUO. 

A reprint of P. Keer's Map of 1G17, as re-issued in 1620. 

1648. 

Wiltonia sive Coniitatus Wiltoniensis ; Auglis 
Wil Shire. 

In (WW,. 101' .lOANNIS r.I.AKr TIIKA TIMM OIM'.IS IKKIIAKIM. SIVK 
VOL. XXXVll. — NO. ( XVI. '1 A 



300 Maps of Wiltshire. 

ATLAS NOVUS. PARS QUAKTA. AMSTERDAMI, APUD JOHANNEM 

BLAEU, 1648. fol. 

An uncoloured copy of Blaeu's map of 1648, but without text on the 
back. 

1650. 

Wilshire. Performed by John Speed. And are to 
be sold by Koger Rea the Elder and Younger 
at the Golden Crosse in Cornhlll against the 
Exchange. 

In THE THEATRE OF THE EMPIRE OF GREAT BRiTAINE . . . 
BY J. SPEED. IMPRINTED AT LONDON. ANNO . . . 1650. 
ARE TO BE SOLD BY ROGER REA THE ELDER AND YOUNGER AT 
THE GOLDEN CROSSE IN CORNHILL AGA'^- Ye EXCHANGE. fol. 

Another edition of Speed's map of 1611, with imprint altered as above. 

1830. 

Wiltshire. Drawn under the Superintendance of 
T. L. Murray. Hoar & Reeves, sculpt. Scale, 
10 miles [ = 2f inches]. London. Published May 1st, 
1830, by T. L. Murray, 19, Adam Street, Adelphi. 13|in. x 18in. 

In AN ATLAS OF THE ENGLISH COUNTIES . . . PROJECTED 
ON THE BASIS OF THE TEIGONOMETRICAL SURVEY BY ORDER 
OF THE . . . BOARD OF ORDNANCE. UNDER THE SUPER- 
INTENDANCE OF T. L. MURRAY. [LONDON, 1830.] 4to. 

A hill-shaded map, very similar to that of W. Ebden of 1825. 

Shows towns, villages, parks, woods, bridges, rivers, and roads (with 
the miles marked along the main roads). Top left-hand corner, the title. 
Bottom left-hand corner, the "Explanation" and the "Scale." Top 
right-hand corner, detached portions of the county. Bottom right-hand 
corner, " Keferences to the Hundreds." Bottom, below the border, the 
imprint, and the names of the author and engraver. 



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2 8 OCT 1338 



CONGRESS 

OK 

Hrcb^oloGical Societies 

IN Union with thI': 

^ocictg of ^ntiquarifs of London. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5th, 1911. 



The Twenty-second Congress of Archaeological Societies in union 
with the Society of Antiquaries of London was held on July 5th, 
igii, at Burlington House, under the presidency of C. H. Read, 
Esq., LL.D., President of the Society of Antiquaries. 

The Congress was attended by delegates from the Society of 
Antiquaries, the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, the 
Cambrian Archaeological Association, the Society of Genealogists of 
London, Folk-lore and Huguenot Societies, the Viking Club, the 
Berkshire, (notice of the Congress accidentally failed to reach 
delegates from the Bucks and another Society), Bristol and 
Gloucestershire, Cambridge, Essex, Hampshire, Lancashire and 
Cheshire, Leicestershire, Newcastle, Somesetshire, Suffolk, Surrey, 
and Sussex Societies and Members of the Council and of the 
i;arth works Commitlee. 

The adoption of the report was moved by the President and 
seconded by Sir Edward Brabrook. On the motion of Mr. Nevill, 
the Congress again passed a resolution concerning the supply 
n\ Public Record Ofhce publications to certain libraries, and 
lor a second time a resolution asking the Go\ernment to direct that 
arrangements shall be made by the authorities at Somerset House 
,in order that access for literary study may be given to all 
documents, ecclesiastical as well as probate records now in their 
I harge, in the same way as at the Public Record Office. 

Mr. Nevill stated that there had been received merely an 
, acknowledgment of the resolution moved on the previous occasion 
land they now should respectfully ask the Government to attend to 
their representations. He proposed that copies of the resolution, 
together with a covering letter, should again be sent to the Prime 
iMinister and also a copy of the correspondence to the Times and 
to The Atlieihcioii. The proposition was carried unanimously. 

Mr. Minet explained what had been done regarding the Subject 

i.aiur luchtx. They had now tlic whole of the material which 

jMessrs. Constable had prepared and Dr. William ^Lartin had been 

'-'ood enough to undertake to draw up the Index. The (piestion of 



meeting the expense of publication had not been decided, but, if 
they could be sure that the demand would pay the cost of printing, 
the sooner it was put into the printer's hands the better. 

The President said that he could not imagine anything in the 
shape of literary material which would be more useful to local 
societies than such an index. When completed, it would remain in 
the Library of the Society of Antiquaries until the requisite funds 
for printing it were found. Until printed, it could not serve the 
proper purpose for which it was originally designed. 

Dr. William Martin said that he hoped to complete the Index 
before Christmas. The Society of Antiquaries had been good 
enough to give a grant which would be employed for clerical 
assistance and for typing three copies. These copies would be 
placed in the Society's Library together with the Index Slips and 
other material of Messrs. Constable. That was as far as the Council 
had gone at present. 

Major W. J. Freer (Leicestershire) asked what would be the 
cost of producing the Index. He promised a donation of ;^io 
towards meeting the expense. 

Dr. William Martin thought that the cost of the manuscript 
would not exceed ;^i5, in addition to the ;^io with which, through 
the munificence of a member of the committee, the Index Committee 
had been able to purchase Messrs. Constable's Index Slips, as 
mentioned in the Council's Report for the year, and to conclude an 
amicable arrangement with that firm. He had no knowledge of 
what the printing would cost. It depended on many considerations, 
such as the bulk of the Index and the form which it finally took. In 
answer to Mr. Nevill, every important word which appeared under 
every title would be indexed either directly or by cross-references, 
while there would also be grouping under subject-matter headings. 
What he had in mind as a pattern was the admirable Subject Matter 
Index Key which for many years had been published and employed 
by the Patent Office for indexing thousands of inventions. 

The Council's report was then adopted. The accounts were 
also agreed to. Mr. Minet was thanked for his services as auditor 
and was unanimously re-elected. 

The Council was re-elected as follows, with the addition of Mr. 
Wm. Dale, F.S.A., Mr. P. M. Johnston, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., and 
Colonel Attree, R.E., F.S.A.:— 

The Officers of the Society of Antiquaries. W. Paley Baildon, 
F.S.A., Lord Balcarres, M.P., F.S.A., Rev. P. H. Ditchfield, M.A., j 
F.S.A., Major W. J. Freer, D.L., V.D., F.S.A., Sir Laurence Gomme, 
F.S.A., Emanuel Green, F.S.A. , W. H. St. John Hope, M.A., Henry 
Laver, F.S.A., William Minet, F.S.A., Canon Rupert Morris, D.D., 
F.S.A., Ralph Nevill, F.S.A., J. Horace Round, M.A., LL.D., J. B. 
Willis-Bund, M.A., F.S.A. 

On the motion of the President, the Congress warmly thanked Dr, 




2 8 OCT 1558 



William Martin for his services as Honorary Secretary during the 
past year, and unanimously requested him to remain in office. 

Dr. William Martin, in acceding to the request, thanked the 
Congress for the honour extended to him. Now that he had gained 
experience in what was required, he hoped to make the position as 
successful as it had been under his predecessors. 

Mr. A. G. Chater presented the Annual Report of the Earthworks 
Conmiittee, and expressed regret that he had found it necessary to 
resign the post of Honorary Secretary to the Committee. The 
Council reported the appointment of Mr. Albany F. Major as Mr. 
Chater's successor. 

The President remarked that the report was an interesting one, 
and that again it justified the existence of that important Committee. 

Mr. Chater in replying to a delegate said that not all the 
Societies in Union took a copy of the Committee's Report for each 
of their members. For two years. Societies had been paying into 
the Congress Funds at the rate of 2s. 6d. per lOO copies. In the 
first year, when the change was made, there was a considerable 
falling off, but last year several of the Societies which had omitted 
to take reports the previous year changed their minds and took 
them. About two-thirds of the membership of the Congress now 
subscribed. 

Dr. William Martin pointed out that they could scarcely expect 
every Society to take the Reports. For instance, the Huguenot 
Society had very little interest in earthworks ; but several Societies 
which ought to have copies refrained for some reason or otl)er from 
doing so. 

Mr. William Dale (Hants) thought that the defaulting Societies 
only needed reminders. 

The President agreed, for it was inconceivable that Societies 
which were doing active work should not wish to go to the expense 
of 7/6 for 300 copies. Representations from Dr. Martin or from the 
Earthworks Committee would no doubt produce its effect in increas- 
ing the circulation. Dr. Read then proceeded to refer to Scamm- 
ridge Dyke, near Scarborough, remarking that it was only proper 
that, when success had been achie\ed in dealing with a public 
authority in a matter of the kind to which he was drawing attention, 
the success should be brought to the notice of a Congress such as 
this. What happened was that, at a meeting of the Earthworks 
Connuittee, Mr. Chater mentioned that the Rural District Council 
proposed to use Scammridge Dyke as the foundation for a reservoir 
to supply a small village with water. He (the speaker) thereupon 
wrote to the Local Secretary of the Society of Anticpiaries and 
obtained a good deal of information, together with an intimation that 
the Scarborough District Council was firm in its determination to 
send the plans to the Local Government Board. He then wrote to 
the Local Secretary in forcible terms, pointing out what an improper 
thing it was for a public body to do, and that they ou^ht lather to 
preserve than destroy. The letter was sent to the Clerk of 



the Council, who appeared to take some exception to his action. 
In reply he wrote a placatory letter to the Clerk saying that it was 
the Society's duty to point out when earthworks could be preserved 
from threatened destruction. He also wrote to the President of the 
Local Government Board asking if he would be good enough to 
make sure, before passing the plans, that the utilisation of the Dyke 
was the only means of securing the necessary water-supply. In 
reply he received a letter stating that Mr. John Burns had appointed 
an Inspector to hold an Inquiry, and that if the Society of Antiquaries 
desired to offer any evidence it would have an opportunity of doing 
so. Accordingly, he informed the Local Secretary, and Mr. Kitson 
Clark and Mr. Crossley, of the Yorkshire Arch^ological Society, 
attended the Inquiry. The result was entirely satisfactory to the 
local society and to the Society of Antiquaries, and the speaker was 
sure it was also to the Congress. The President thought that the 
result was in a great measure due to the arch geologically intelligent 
action of the President of the Local Government Board. 

The Report of the Earthworks Committee was agreed to. 

Mr. Nevill pointed out that Mr. Chater had borne the brunt of 
the work for four years, and proposed a vote of thanks to him. The 
Congress, he said, must be indebted to him for so ably carrying out 
the work. 

The President observed that none could realise the amount of 
work which went to produce a Committee's Report unless he himself 
had experienced it. Mr. Chater had done admirable work and had 
kept the wheels of the machine so well greased that there had been 
an entire absence of friction. The Secretaryship involved a great 
deal of work and correspondence and demanded much judgment and 
tact. In all those ways, the Congress had been fortunate in having 
Mr. Chater as Secretary of the Committee. In regretting his resig- 
nation, they expressed their thanks for the admirable way in which 
he had carried on his duties. 

The vote of thanks, coupled with an expression of regret at his 
resignation, was cordially passed. In acknowledgment, Mr. Chater 
was sorry he had not been able to continue in office for a longer ! 
period. He thanked the local societies for the way in which they had 
supported the Earthworks Committee. 

The subject of Church Restoration was then discussed. It arose j 
out of a Resolution passed at the last Congress, the Council having j 
made during the past twelve months the following recommendation : i 

" That the position of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 
respect of work hitherto accomplished in advising Diocesan] 
Authorities on matters of Church Restoration should bej 
strengthened by the grant of additional powers through! 
' The Ancient Monuments (England) ' Royal Commission ;j 
and that the Council of the Congress of Archaeological 
Societies of England and Wales recommends the appoint 
ment of the Society as the advisory authority for England 
and Wales in all matters relating to the fabric, furniture 
and monuments of Churches." 




28 OCT 1558 



The President said that as to the main principle of Church 

Restoration he did not suppose there could be any difference of 

opinion at that Congress. Last year the Congress supported a 

Resolution brought forward by Mr. Johnston approving of the 

principle that a Committee appointed by the Local Society should 

act as an Advisory Connnittee to the Bishop of the Diocese in 

connection with the granting of faculties for Church restoration. 

The Congress instructed the Council to draw up a reconnnendation 

I for circulation among the Hishops. This instruction the Council did 

not strictly carry out, and as Mr. Johnston thought the Council's 

resolution might render his own of less utility, Mr. Johnston 

■ desired to bring forward a supplementary Resolution, which would 

I make the two in the Council's report run together in double harness. 

Mr. P. M. Johnston (Surrey) said that the Special Committee 

had already been set up in Sussex. Its working in conjunction with 

the Bishop of Chichester served as a model for other Counties. He 

I was alive to the importance of the work of local societies being 

carried on with the fullest sympathy of the Society of Antiquaries, 

' but he felt that although the Society of Antiquaries had its secretaries 

i in different parts of tlie country they could not always have access 

I to information in the same way as the local Archaeological Societies 

had. It was of the utmost importance that faculties should be 

applied for in every case where a church fabric was involved, 

; because, from an archaeological point of view, any alteration or 

' addition might be of supreme interest. The putting up of panelling 

^ or the remo\'al of a screen might seem a detail in the eyes of clergy- 

i men or parishioners, but to archaeologists it might be of the utmost 

' importance. If a faculty had to be applied for in every case 

archaeologists would have timely warning, and, if the Bishop of the 

I Diocese could forbid any threatened mischief, it would prevent the 

\ little acts of mischief which were constantly occurring. This was 

where the local societies could prove more useful than one or two 

; secretaries of a central body. If the local societies had not sufficient 

' weight to pre\'ent damage to a church an appeal could then be made 

to the Society of Antic[uaries. Me mo\ed the following rider to the 

' Council's recommendation : — 

"That this Congress of Archicological Societies of England, 
Wales, and Ireland, recognising the importance of local 
knowledge and influence, approxes the step already 
taken by the Sussex Arclueological Society in setting up a 
Special (^)iniiiilte(' to watch over the ecclesiastical 
anti(|uiti('s of that County, to warn the Bishop of any 
tineatened mischief to an ancient church, and to tender 
advice where a faculty is applied for within the Diocese 
of Chichester. The Congress further commends this 
arrangement to the consideration of other local archaeo- 
logical societies for imitation where circumstance allow, 
such local action to be supplementary to the general 
powers sought to be obf .lined foi' the Society of 
Anticiuaries through the Ancient Monuments Royal 
Commissions (Lngkind and Wales)." 



lb 



Mr. H. Quarrell (Leicestershire) seconded, and said that the 
question turned upon the local committee being in touch with the 
right man. He did not see how the Society of Antiquaries or the 
local societies could keep watch upon everything. There must be 
a local man. Fourteen or fifteen years ago, some alterations of a 
most drastic character were to be made to a church. Two or three 
local men made an appeal to the clergyman in authority, but 
failed and did not press the matter further. He, however, wrote to 
the patron of the living, who took up the question with such vigour 
that the proposed damage was prevented. 

Mr. R. Garraway Rice (Sussex), knew that damage was often 
done, if local archaeologists reported to a Society at a distance and 
asked it to take action, that Society's representations would have 
far more weight. It was often invidious to tackle one's next door 
neighbour over some pet scheme. It was the small job that escaped 
notice, and if a faculty had to be applied for in every instance, 
considerable help would be afforded to archaeologists. 

Mrs. Wintle Johnston (Viking Club) expressed the view that 
antiquaries should be appointed to carry out church restoration. 
The way in which a church was restored meant a great deal. 

Canon Warren (Suffolk) said that in his part of the country 
they felt that a local body would encounter great hostility perhaps 
from the architect under whose supervision the work of restoration 
was to be carried out. They preferred that action should proceed 
from the Society of Antiquaries in London. 

Mr. Nevill (Surrey) did not agree with the action of the Council, 
which he thought had somewhat exceeded its functions. He did not 
think that the action of the Society of Antiquaries in the past as 
regards church restoration had been altogether satisfactory. 
Neither did he think it would be satisfactory to local societies to 
know that by their own action they were entirely in the hands not 
of the Society of Antiquaries but of the Officers deputed to act. He 
moved as an addition to the rider proposed by Mr. Johnston that no 
action should be taken by the Society of Antiquaries except in co- 
operation with the county or local societies who should be asked to 
appoint delegates. He thought that the local bodies, which had 
knowledge of the subject on which action was needed, should have 
some power and be consulted before steps were taken. 

Mr. Johnston suggested to Mr. Nevill that the addition should be 
worded so as to read "This Congress also recommends that no local 
action be taken by the Society of Antiquaries without consultation 
with a local Archaeological Society in the particular locality, which 
shall be invited to send delegates to confer, if required." 

Mr. Nevill accepted the suggestion and Major Freer seconded 
the motion. 

The President ruled that it must be an amendment, not a rider. 

Mr. C. E. Keyser (Reading) hoped the amendment would be 
passed. He thought it would be admirable if the local societies 




28 OCT 1^58 



could induce the Bishops to recognise small committees, for they 
would stop the ill-advised restoration that was going on. The 
Society of Antiquaries should be officially recognised as the Court 
of Appeal. If the advice of the local society was not accepted, the 
Society of Antiquaries should have power to give advice which must 
be accepted. 

The President said that his main objection to Mr. Nevill's amend- 
ment was that it was not practical. It was necessary to trust some- 
one, and the Society of Antiquaries was probably the best body that 
could be selected. He did not see how the Society could hold a 
position in which it had to ask permission from a local society before 
invading its territory. He deprecated very much the stopping of 
any action by the Society of Antiquaries before the consent of the 
local society had been obtained. He should not recommend the 
Society of Antiquaries to accept the amendment. 

Major Freer successfully appealed to Mr. Nevill to withdraw the 
amendment. 

Mr. Johnston's rider was then carried unanimously. 

Mr. H. St. George Gray (Somersetshire) said that there had 
been great difficulty in discovering where excavations in various 
counties were taking place and the means of approach to them. 
Excavations were not sufficiently advertised among antiquaries and 
the general public. If people only knew where they were being 
carried out, there would be less poverty in some of the excavation 
I funds. He suggested that a directory setting forth details of all the 
I excavations arranged for the year should be published in the Spring 
, and issued to Societies. Such a publication should give the fullest 
information, but he would be content at first, if the nature of the 
: excavations was stated, what the nearest station was, and how the 
1 excavations could be approached. The preparation of the infor- 
mation would however entail a great deal of work on the Secretary. 

j The President remarked that while they sympathised with the 

I proposition the Congress was possibly not the right body to take the 
matter in hand. Mr. Gray might find some archaeological publica- 
tion to take notice of his suggestion. 

Mr. Major (Karthworks' Committee) suggested that the Congress 
might arrange some scheme in conjunction with an archaeological 
puhlication. 

The President considered that the benefit derived would hardly 
justify the amount of work required. He deprecated any addition 
jtothe work of the Honorary Secretary. 

I Mr. Nevill thought that information of local excavations might 
be sent to the papers in the district and also gi\en in the publications 
'of the local society. Again, a full progrannne might be drawn up 
|and forwarded to the /I >r//(ru/(),;;iV(f/ Rei'iejc, which might pnbHsh ;in 
'extract. 



Mr. Gray considered that the Congress might father the scheme. 
The Antiquary might publish a list in the Spring provided some one 
prepared it. 

The President suggested that it would be a practical solution if 
Mr. Gray would lay before the Council, before the next Congress, 
such a scheme as he would desire to be published. Then the matter 
could be dealt with more definitely by the next Congress. 

Mr. A. Brooke (Lancashire and Cheshire) drew the delegates' 
attention to the opening up at Vale Royal of the largest Cistercian 
Abbey in the Kingdom. 

On the motion of Canon Rupert Morris (Wales; Royal Society 
of Antiquaries of Ireland), the Council of the Society of Antiquaries 
was thanked for the use of the room. 



WILLIAM 



2, Garden Court, 
Temple, 



MARTIN, F.S.A. 

Hon, Secretary. 



E.C. 



Gibbs & Bamforth, Ltd., Printers, St. Albans. 




-r — "'f 



^ fi nnT irtzo 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 



ON 



ANCIENT EARTHWORKS AND 
FORTIFIED ENCLOSURES, 



Prepared for presentation to the Congress of 
Arehosologieal Societies, July 5tli, 1911. 



COMMITTEE. 

Lord Bai.CARRP:s, M.P., F.S.A. {C/minfian). 



1 



Mr. A. Hadrian AuxROFT, M.A. 
Mr. W. J. Andkkw, F.S.A. 
Col. F. W. T. Attrek, F.S.A. 
Mr. C. H. B0THAMI.EY, F.I.C. 
Mr. J. G. N. CuFT. 
Mr. E. S. CoBBou), C.E., F.G.S. 
Mr. S. Denison. 

Mr, WlIJ.OUGIIBV CiAKDNlCK. 

Mr. A. R. GoDDARi), B.A. 

Professor F. HAVJ-Ki'na.D, M.A., 
F.S.A. 

I Mr. A. G. CiiATK 

i\Ir. Ai.i'.Axv I-. Ma. 
(Address : oO, The 



Mr. W. H. St. John Hope, M.A. 

Mr. H. Layer, F.S.A. 

Mr. C. Lynam, F.S.A. 

Mr. D. H. Montgomerie, F.S.A. 

Mr. C. H. Read, LL.D., P.S. A. 

Mr. J. Horace Round, LL.D. 

Col. O. E. Ruck, F.S.A.Scot. 

Mr. W. M. Tapp, LL.D., F.S.A. 

President B. C. A. Windi.k, 
F.R.S. 

K, l/ou. Sfc. (1910-1 1 ). 

joi-j, //();/. S(C. (191 1- 12). 
Wuldrons, Croydon). 



The revised " Scheme for recording Ancient Defensive Earth- 
works and Fortified Enclosures," announced in last year's 
Report, was distributed in the autumn to those Societies which 
subscribed towards its issue. A small stock remains in the 
hands of the Committee, which, it is thought, will be sufficient 
to satisfy the demand for the next few years. Only a limited 
number of copies can now be supplied to anj^ single Society, 
and enquiries should be addressed to the Hon. Secretary. 

As evidence of the increasing importance attached to the 
study of Ancient Earthworks, it may be mentioned that two 
more of the Societies in Union report the formation of special 
Earthworks Committees : the Dorset Field Club, with Dr. H. 
CoHey March, F.S.A., as President, and the Rev. C. W. Whistler 
as Hon. Secretary ; and the Bucks. Architectural and Archgeo- 
logical Society, with Mr. A. H. Cocks, F.S.A., as Chairman, 
and Dr. E- H. West as Hon. Secretary. 

The Committee hears with interest that Dr. J. P. Williams- 
Freeman, whose survey of the defensive Earthworks of 
Hampshire was completed last year, is now engaged in 
cataloguing the barrows of that county. The value of such 
work, especially when performed by investigators with local 
knowledge, cannot be too often insisted upon ; and it is very 
gratifying to be able to announce that the Committee receives 
from time to time offers to undertake the survey of the 
earthworks of limited areas from antiquaries residing in 
different parts of the country. An immense field, however, 
remains to be explored, and the Committee would once more f 
impress upon the Secretaries of local Societies the urgency i 
of enlisting capable recruits for this work. 



The Committee has to aniiotince, with regret, that its 
Secretary, Mr. A. G. Chater, finds it necessary to resign the 
post, and has great pleasure in announcing that Mr. Albany 
F. Major has kindly consented to undertake the duties of 
Hon. Secretary from this date. 

The following items of information, classified under the 
usual heads, have been brought to the knowledge of the 
Committee. 

PRESERVATION. 

Somerset. — StokeIvEIGh Camp.— The Leigh Woods Ivocal 
Committee have partially cleared superfluous undergrowth 
within and around Stokeleigh Camp, making it more ac- 
cessible to the public, and have done their best to guard 
the camp from mutilation. 

Yorkshire. — Scamridge Dykes. — An attempt made by the 
Scarborough Rural District Council to construct a reservoir, in 
connection with the water supply for the village of Snainton, 
in the middle of Scamridge Dykes has been frustrated through 
representations made to the President of the Ivocal Government 
Board by the Society of Antiquaries and the Yorkshire Archaeo- 
logical Society, and plans showing a reservoir clear of the dykes 
have been submitted to the Local Government Board. 

Skipsea. — At the instance of the Yorkshire 

Archaeological Society, that portion of the Skipsea earthworks 
owned by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners has been placed 
in charge of H. M. Commissioners of Works under the Ancient 
Monuments Protection Acts. 



DESTRUCTION. 

Bedfordsiiiri^. — WiijjNGTON. — Mr. Beauchanip Wculniore 
reports that all the land around the earthwork at Wiliington, 
near Bedford, has been broken up for allotments. Only the 



inner enclosure with the main fosse, including the counter- 
scarp, has been railed oflf for preservation. This is greatly 
to be regretted, as, with the destruction of the outer works, 
the interest of this perhaps unique example will be lost. 

Carnarvonshire. — Pknmaenmawr. — Mr. Willoughby 
Gardner reports that the destruction of this magnificent 
fortress, by quarrying under a lease from the Crown, is still 
slowly in progress, and that much indignant local agitation 
and protest has been manifested, following on Mr. Gardner's 
bringing the matter before the Earthworks Committee, the 
Cambrian Archaeological Association, the Royal Commission 
on the Ancient Monuments of Wales, the National Trust, the 
Woods and Forests Commissioners, and Parliament, without 
avail. 

Dorset. — The Rev. C. W, Whistler writes that, with the 
exception of the levelling of an already opened tumulus, for 
agricultural purposes, in a field to the south of the main 
Dorchester road, about two miles from Blandford, there is no 
destruction to report in the county. 

G1.0UCESTERSHIRE. — U1.EY Bury. — It has been brought to 
the notice of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological 
Society that quarrying is still being carried on at Uley Bury, 
which endangers the earthworks of the camp. 

WESTMORI.AND. — Stainton.— Mr. W.G. Collingwood,F.S. A., 
reports that a small "British Settlement" at Stone Close, 
Stainton-in-Furness, finally obliterated by quarrying, has been 
under observation by the Cumberland and Westmorland 
Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, and a report will 
appear. 

WiivTSHiRE.— AvEBURY. — The Wiltshire Archaeological and 
Natural History Society reports that digging for chalk has 
somewhat injured the slight ditch round the top of Windmill 
Hill, Avebury. 



EXPLORATION. 

Cambridgeshirk.— BowRN. — The Rev. F. G.Walker reports 
that two tumuli at Boweu have been proved to be of Roman 
origin. One of these was covered by a Danish tumulus (see 
Bibliography — Walker). 

Cambridgk.— The earthwork in Magdalene 



College grounds has been proved to be Roman in origin 
(see Bibliography-Walker). 

Dkrbyshire. — Rkpton.— The rectangular earthwork, known 
as the Buries, on the right bank of the Trent at Repton, was 
excavated last August by Dr. G. A. Auden, F.S.A., and Mr. 
F. Simpson. An account of the excavation, with plans, will 
appear in a forthcoming number of the Derbys. Arch. Soc. 
transactions. Bateman made a trial excavation without 
result in about 1856, and a second attempt was made in 1869. 
The pottery found is of the XV. century, and the remains of 
stone foundations of a small building were associated with 
XV. century roofing tiles. The earthwork had previously 
been attributed to the Roman occupation (Stebbing Shaw) and 
to the Danish occupation in 874-5 (Hipkins), but nothing 
pointing to those periods was found. 

Dorset.— Maumbury Rings, Dorchester. — The explora- 
tion of the Roman amphitheatre was continued in August and 
September, 19 10 (third season), with most satisfactory results. 
The work will be temporarily suspended during 191 1, l)ut is 
by no means completed. (See Bil)liography— Gray). 

Huntingdonshire. — Permission has l)een given and it is 
])r()posed b}- the Cambs. and Hunts. Arclueological Socict)- 
to examine a tunuilus in the county of Huntingdon, as soon 
as the requisite funds arc in hand. 

NuKi'Oi.K. — Norwich. -Thicc trial holes ha\c been sunk 
in Norwich Castle Mound. The oiii-inal surface was met witli 



at a depth of 23-34 feet. Carefully made diagrams have been 
preserved. 

Somerset.— Stokklbigh.— Recently some slight excava- 
tions have been made in Stokeleigh Camp under the direction 
of Prof. C. Lloyd Morgan, F.R.S., and Mr. A. K. Hudd, F.S.A., 
but nothing was found to throw further light on the origin 
and construction of the camp. The dry walling along the 
crest of the inner vallum was excavated in several places, and 
two of the best examples have been left exposed and will be 
kept for the inspection of visitors, after being protected by 
posts and rails. No remains of any ancient entrance to the 
camp could be found, and no pottery or other ancient remains 
turned up in the various excavations. The wall is built of 
rough stones, some of considerable size, without mortar or 
cement, and without foundations. It remains to a height of 
about 3 feet, and is from 4 to 4I feet wide at the base. 

I 

Surrey. — Chei^sham. — Work is now being carried on at 
a hitherto unrecorded entrenchment in Henley Wood, Chelsham, 
by the Croydon Natural History Society, but the results are 
not yet ready for publication. 

Sussex. — Several valley entrenchments have been noted 
by Mr. A. Hadrian Allcroft and Mr. H. S. Toms, in the 
neighbourhood of Brighton and Lewes, but no excavations 
have taken place during the past year. Mr. Toms reports 
having recently discovered the remains of another of these 
works, constructed over ancient cultivations (similar to the 
entrenchment in Kastwick Valley, near Brighton), in the 
valley south of Fulking Corner, west of the Dyke Station. 

Wiltshire. — Avebury.— Mr. H. St. George Gray conducted 
the third seasons' s work here, on behalf of the British Associa- 
tion, from April 24th to May 13th, 19 11, laying bare a length 
of 35 feet of the great fosse on the S.S.W. (maximum depth 
below the silting, 18J feet). Red-deer antlers were uncovered 



on the bottom of the fosse, and ornamented pottery of Long- 
barrow type was found at a depth of only 5 feet below the 
surface of the silting in mixed mould. No trace of worked 
metal was found below the Roman stratum ; the latter deposit 
was clearly defined by shards of pottery and a fibula of 
bronze bearing the maker's name, AVCISSA. It is hoped 
that there will be an opportunity of excavating the fosse 
close up against the eastern side of the southern entrance- 
causeway, and the vallum may be cut through at one of its 
lowest points. During the three seasons' work (1908, 1909, 
191 1) a large number of sectional diagrams and photographs 
have been made. A report upon the 191 1 work will be sent 
to the Portsmouth meeting of the British Association, Aug. — 
Sept., 1911. 

CasterIvEy Camp. — Mr. and Mrs. B. H. 



Cunnington have continued the excavation of the inner 
enclosure and pits in the centre of Casterley Camp. 
Particulars have not yet been published. The objects found 
(Late Celtic and Romano-British) have been placed in Devizes 
Museum. 

Old Sarum. — Last year's work of the Society 



of Antiquaries was practically confined to the uncovering of 
masonry structures. 

Yorkshire. — Gargrave. — Dr. Villy of Keighley has done 
a little excavation at Gargrave en the site of a Roman earth- 
work, particulars of which will appear in the Bradford Antiquary. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

Ro_\'al Commission on Historical Moiiuinciits (Iviiglaiicl). — An 

Inventor)- of the Historical Monuments in Ilcrtfoitlshirc. 

(The Inventor)' incUuIes all the caiih works i)i llic 

count}', with plans and sections of the nu)i"e 

important examples). 



8 

Amongst other recent contributions to the literature of 
the subject, the following may be noticed : — 

Armitage (Mrs. B.)- — "Early Norman Castles in the 
British Isles." Illustrated with drawings by 
Duncan H. Montgomerie. (I^ondon, John Murray, 
1911). 

Aylott (George).—" Pirton Castle." (Trans. East Herts. 
Archseol. Soc, Vol IV., Part I.) 

Bush (Thos. S.). — Report on the Explorations on 
Lansdown, etc., 1910. (Proc. of the Bath and 
District Branch of the Somersetsh. Archaeol. and 
N. H. Soc, 1910). 

Cunnington (Mrs. M. E.)- — "A Mediaeval Earthwork 
near Morgan's Hill." (Wilts. Archaeol. Mag., 
Vol. XXXVI.) 

Curwen (John F.). — "Castle How, Peel Wyke, Bassen- 
thwaite." (Trans. Cumb. and Westm. A. and A. 
Soc, N.S., Vol. XI.) 

Graham (T. H. B.).— " Extinct Castles in Cumberland." 
(Trans. Cumb. and Westm. A. and A. Soc, N.S., 
Vol. XI.) 

Gray (H. St. George).— Third Interim Report of the 
Excavations at Maumbury Rings, Dorchester, 1910. 
(Proc Dorset Field Club, Vol. XXXI. Also issued 
separately). (See also The Times, Sept. 14th, 1910, 
and March 29th, 191 1). 



- "The Earthwork near Butley." (Proc. Suffolk 
Inst, of Archaeol. and Nat. Hist., Vol. XIV.) (See 
also The Times, April 5th, 19 10). 



Gray (H. St. George). — Notes on Archaeological Remains 
found on Ham Hill, Somerset. (Proc. Somersetsh. 
Archseol. and N. H. Soc, Vol. I.VI.) 



Winwood (Rev. H. H.) and Walter (R. H.).— 

Excursion Notes on Ham Hill Camp and Quarries. 
(Proc. Som. Arch, and N. H. Soc, Vol. I.VI.) 

Hope (W. St. John) and Stephenson (Mill). — " Excava- 
tions about the Site of the Roman City at vSilchester, 
Hants., in 1909." (Archocologia, Vol. LXH., Part I.) 

Macdonald (George).— " The Roman Wall in Scotland." 
(Glasgow, MacLehose, 191 1). 

Major (Albany F.).— ''The Filling-in of the Eastern Ditch 
at Oliver's Camp, near Devizes." (The Antiquary, 
June, 191 1). 

May (Thomas).- "The Roman Forts at Elslack." (Yorks. 
Archseol. Journal, Vol. XXI.) 

Morgan (Col. W, El.)-— "Cil Ivor Camp." (Archceologia 
Cambrensis, 6th Series, Vol. XL, Part I.) 

Orpen (Goddard H.). — "Notes on some County Limerick 
Castles." (Proc. R. Soc. Ant. Ireland, Vol. XXXIX., 
Part I.) 



"The Mote of Knockgraffon." (Proc. R. Soc. 
Ant. Ireland, Vol. XXXIX., Part IIL) 

" Motes and Norman Castles in Ossory." ^I'l'^c. R. 
Soc. Ant. Ireland, Vol. XXXIX., Part IV.) 



lO 



Orpen (Goddard H.) — ** Ireland under the Normans, 
1169-1216." (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 191 1). 
(Contains references to numerous Motes). 

Toms (H. S.)- — " Prehistoric Cattlefolds near Kast^ 
bourne." (Kastbourne Chronicle, August 20th, 
1910) . 

Villy (Francis).—" Excavations at Castlestead Ring, near 
Cullingworth." (Bradford Scientific Journal, April, 
1911). 



- On the Association of lyong Barrows with Rec- 
tangular Earthworks. (Bradford Antiquary, 19 10). 



Walker (Rev. F. G.).— Excavations at Bowen, Cambs., 
and in the Roman Earthwork in Magdalene College 
grounds, Cambridge. (Proc. Cambridge Anti- 
quarian Soc.) 

Westropp (T. J.)— " Carrigaholt (Co. Clare) and its 
Neighbourhood," Part I. (North Munster Archaeol. 
Soc, Vol. I.) 



" Notes on the I^arger Cliff Forts of the West 
Coast of County Mayo." (Proc. R. Irish Acad., 
Vol. XXIX., Sect. C, No. 2). 

I 

- " Promontory Forts and Similar Structures in 

the County Kerry." Parts II., III. and IV. (Proc. R. 
Soc. Ant. Ireland, Vol. XI,., Parts II., III. and IV.) 

- *'St. Mochulla of Tulla, Co. Clare: his Legend 
and the Entrenchments and Remains of his 
Monastery." (Proc. R. Soc. Ant. Ireland, Vol. 
XI,I., Part IV.) 



II 



Wcstropp (T. J.)— "Early Forts and vStone Huts in 
Inishmore, Aran Isles, Galway Bay." (Proc. R. 
Irish Acad., Vol. XXVIII., Sect. C, No. ii). 

Williams-Freeman (J. P.). — " Danebury." (Papers and 
Proc. of the Hampshire Field Club, Vol. VI., 
Part IV.) 



Correspondence should now be addressed to the Hon. 
Secretary to the Committee : 



ALBANY F. MAJOR, 

BiFROST, 30, ThK WAI.DRONS, 

Croydon. 



12 



CLASSIFICATION. 

The classification of defensive works recommended by the 
Committee now stands as follows : — 

A. Fortresses partly inaccessible by reason of precipices, 

cliffs, or water, defended in part only by artificial 
works. 

B. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, 

following the natural line of the hill. 

Or, though usually on high ground, less dependent 
on natural slopes for protection. 

C. Rectangular or other enclosures of simple plan 

(including forts and town of the Romano-British 
period). 

D. Forts consisting only of a mount with encircling 

moat or fosse. 

E. Fortified mounts, wholly or partly artificial, with 

remains of an attached court or bailey, or showing 
two or more such courts. 

F. Homestead moats, consisting of simple or compound 

enclosures formed into artificial islands by water 
moats. 

G. Enclosures, mostly rectangular, partaking of the 

form of F, but protected by stronger defensive 
works, ramparted and fossed, and in some instances 
provided with outworks. 

H. Ancient village sites protected by walls, ramparts 
or fosses. 

X. Defensive or other works which fall under none 
of the above headings. 




THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIOISrS (Continued). 

WILTSHIEE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo. 
pp. vii., 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. IN THE REIGNS OF HEN. III., ED. I., & ED. II. Bvo. 
pp. XV. -f- 505. In parts as issued. Price 13s. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY of the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONEHENGE and AVEBURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 96, Dec, 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c., by 732 authors. 



THE COLLECTION OF BIRDS IN THE 
SOCIETY'S MUSEUM. 

Will anyone who knows anything of the place or date at which 
any of the specimens now in the Museum were procured kindly 
communicate with Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Hon. Curator ? 



The Tropenell Cartulary. 

This very important genealogical and topographical work in 2 
vols., 8vo., pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds connected 
with property in many Wiltshire parishes, of the 14th & 15th 
centuries, has recently been published by the Society, and issued 
to subscribers. Only 150 copies were printed, of which a few 
are left. Price to members, £1 10s., and to non-members £2. 
Apply to Mr. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

ADVERTISEMENTS. 

A certain space on the cover of the Magazine will in future be 
available for Advertisements of Books or other kindred matters. 
For terms ai)ply to tlie Rkv. E. H. Goddard, ClylTo Vicarage. 
Swindon. 



FOR SALE.— A COMPLETE SET OF THE WILTS AliCII. iMAG. 

r.ounil half-calf extra. What oilers '? 

Back Numbers of Wilts Arch. I\Ih^. to niuko up shIh can i)e had. 

BOOKBINDING. - Tho Arcli:iM)h),i;ical I\Ia;;;azino carefully houud to 
pattern. I'lstiniutcs L(i\en. 

Ai>i:hj -C. H. WOODWARD. 

Printer and Publisher. Devizes. 



. . THE . . 

North Wilts Museum and 
LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annual subscriptions 
varying from £2 to 5s., to the amount of about £37 a year for this 
purpose have been given by about eighty Members of the Society, 
and the fund thus set on foot has enabled the Committee already 
to add much to the efficiency of the Library and Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least 
£50 a year, in order that the General Fund of the Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the otlier purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, and 
should be sent either to Mr. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes, 
or Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 



The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 



Objects of Antiquity 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes. 

Old Deeds connected with Wiltshire Properties, 

Books, Pamphlets, Articles, Portraits, 
Illustrations from recent Magazines or Papers, 

bearing in any way on the County, or the work of Wiltshire 
Authors, will be most gratefully received for the Library by 
the Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. 
Librarian. 



i 



e- H. WOODWARD, MACHINE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



^8 OCT 1958 



m- 



No. cxvrr. 



JUNE, 191: 



Voi. XXXVI [ 



THE 



WILTSHIT^E 

IrrjiiPiikigirnl iiiiii lintiinil listnrn 
MAGAZINE, 

^9ubltsl)rti untirr tl)r ©trrrtton 

OF THE 

SOCIETY FOR At ED IN THAT COUNTY 
A. D. 18 5 ;i. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, ClyfEe Vicara-o, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

PUINTK.D VN1> SOI, I) KOIC Till'. SociliTV HV ('. II W. mi J> k\ a UP 

I'iXCiiANdi. Hi'iLDiNCs, St.vtion Koah. 



/'/■/(■(■ ~>.^. l>'i. ]h)it''t rs^ (iraii- 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS. 

TAKE ISTOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
vohimes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii,, xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Yokinies are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The I^jTumbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Sul)scrip- 
tions, but in accordance with Byelaw No. 8 " The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and tlie 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
tary : the Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

T[IE BEITISH AND EOMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. C. Smith, M.A. One Volume, Atlas 
4fco., 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 Us, 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo, 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev. T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIES 
IN THE SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Price Is. 6d, 

CATALOGUE of ANTIQUITIES in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM. 
Part 11. 1911. Fully illustrated. Price 2s, 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I., 11. , and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and MAPS, in the SOCIETY'S 
LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY'S 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. and 
3s. 6d. (except in the case of a few numbers, the price of which is raised). 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 



WILTSHIRE 

liTJiiKilogiriil niiti lotiiriil Siatiinj 
MAGAZINE. 



No. (JXVH, JUMK, 1912. Vol. XXX Vll. 



Contents. PAGE 

The Fifty-Eighth Genehal Meeting at Malmesbuhy 327 

Thk Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury : By A. R. 

Maiden, F.S.A 339 

The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland Raised 

in the Division of Warminstkr, 1648 — 353 

Arachnida of Wiltshire : By the Rev. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 

M.A., F.R.S., (fcc 380 

Bewley Court, Lacock : By Harold Brakspear, F.S.A 391 

Notes on the History of Wroughton : By Theresa Story 

Maskelyne 400 

NoTBs on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, Clyffe 

Pypard, Compton Bassett, Hilmarton, Lydiard Tregoze, 

Winter bourne Bassett, and Winterbourne Monkton : By 

C. E. Pouting. F.S.A 417 

Notes 4r)5 

Wilts Obituary 460 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 473 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 489 

Wiltshire Illustrations 402 

Wiltshire Portraits 494 

Additions to Museum and Library 496 

List of Officers and Members of the Society 499 

Account of Receipts and Disbursements of the Society for 

THE Year 1911 509 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Bewley Court, Lacock (fifteen illustrations) 390 

Bewley Court. Entrance Doorway 393 

Illustrations of Ashley, Berwick Ikssett, Clyffe 
Py])ard, Compton Bassett, Hilmarton, Lydiard 
Tregoze, Winterbourne Bassett, and Winterbourne 

Monkton (twenty plates) 454 

( 'ompton Bassett. Hour glass on pillar near ])ulpit 42!) 
Hilmarton. Screen, passage to north aisle and squint 

from the chancel 433 

Hilmarton. Passage from north aisle to chancel, 
with s(|uint and entrance to rood loft stairs, from 
the aisle 134 



DEVIZES: C. H. WooDw.vin), Iv\cii.s.N(:k P.riLDiN'is, Station P.'ai» 



^0W^>. 




THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



MULTOBUM MANIBUS GRANDE LEVATUE ONUS." — Ovid. 

June, 1912. 

THE FIFTY-EIGHTH GENERAL MEETING 

OF 

THE WILTSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND NATURAL 

HISTORY SOCIETY, 

HELD AT MALMESBURY, 

Jiikj 6th, QtJi, and 7th, 1911.1 

John Beddoe, Esq,, L.L.D., F.R.S., President of the Society, 

In the Chair. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5th. 

The Annual General Meeting of tlie Society was held at the 
Council Chamber, at 2.15, after some little delay, caused by the 
fact that one contingent of the Members were waiting at the 
Town Hall whilst the remainder were assembled at tlie Council 
Chamber. 

The rresideut called on THE REV. E. H. GODDARD to read 
the 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SOCIETY FOR 1910-11, 

PlfESKNTKI) JlLY 5t11, 1911. 

I "The Committee beg to })resenL llu^ lit'Ly-oighth annual rei)ort of 
lie Society. 

' The fullest account of the Meeting and the Excur.sions api>ears in the 
^Viltshire Gazette, .Inly Cth iuid i:Uli. Accounts also appear in the Wilt^hiiy 
Tiines, July Sth. 
rOL. XX XV 11. — NO. ex VI I. - K 



328 The Fifty -Eighth General Meeting. 

" Members. — The membership of the Society on June 6th, 1911^ j 
was 374 (16 Life Members and 358 Annual Subscribers), as against 
386 at the corresponding period last year. The Society lost 20 
Members by resignation and 11 by death, a loss of 31 in all, against 
which only 19 new Members were elected during the year. There 
was therefore a net loss of 12 Members. The Committee appeal 
to all Members of the Society, and more especially to the Local 
Secretaries, either themselves to ask all likely residents in their 
neighbourhood to join the Society, or to send their names to the 
Hon. Secretary, who will gladly write to them. Chief among the 
losses by death are those of Mr. N. Story-Maskelyne, F.E.S. 
President of the Society 1884 — 86, who to the end of his long life 
was a constant and generous supporter of the Society's work ; and 
of Mr. C. F. Hart, of Devizes, for many years an active and regular 
attendant at our quarterly Committee meetings. 

''Finance. — The year 1910 ended with a balance on the General 
Fund of £76 18s. 5|d, as against a balance of £37 19s. l\d. with 
which it began ; the Life Membership Fund, from which one-tenth 
is annually paid to the General Fund, showing a balance of 
£62 10s. M., as against £75 6s. U. on December 31st, 1909. Thia I 
satisfactory financial condition is chiefly due to the unprecedented 
balance handed to the Society at the close of the Annual Meeting 
at Calne, which amounted to £36 10s. During 1910, £13 was 
repaid from the Museum Enlargement Fund, to which the rent of 
the caretaker's house is credited, to the General Fund, leaving 
about £27 still owing to that fund of the £50 borrowed from it 
three years ago. The only outstanding debt due from the Society 
is £50 still owing to Mr. W. Heward Bell of the sum lent l:)y him, 
without interest, to the Society for the expenses of the Museum 
enlargement several years ago. 

"The total of subscriptions received by the Museum Maintenance 
Fund during 1910 was £38 7s. 6c?. whilst the amount of admission 
fees and donations in the Museum box was £8 14s. 5c?. 

" The Tropenell Cartulary Fund showed a balance of £26 Is. lid. 
on December 31st, 1910. This sum will be used for the printing 
of the Museum Catalogue now in hand. 



The Report. 32^ 

" The Museum. — The most notable additions to the Museum are 
the fine series of pottery vessels and other objects of the late Celtic 
or Eomano-British period, found by Mr. and Mrs. Cunnington 
during their excavations at Knap Hill and Casterley Camps. These 
fill an entire new wall case, which the existence of the Museum 
Maintenance Fund has enabled the Committee to provide. Another 
most valuable gift is that of two of the large Koman pewter dishes 
found many years ago at Manton and since then preserved at 
Theobalds Park, by Lady Meux. For these the Society is indebted 
to Admiral Sir Hedworth Lambton, K.C.B. A series of about 
eighty Palaeolithic implements from Knowle Farm Pit was pur- 
chased from the Eev. H. G. 0. Kendall, half of the purchase money 
(£3 55.) being contributed by four Members of the Society, the 
other half being provided by the Maintenance Fund. 

"Part IE. of the Catalogue of Antiquities is now in the press, 
and it is hoped that it may be issued to members this year. 

"The number of visitors to the Museum during 1910 was 1020. 

" The Library. — The Society has received, as usual, a considerable 
number of gifts, and the Library grows steadily in completeness. 
Among the gifts has been a series of family deeds given by Mrs. 
Buxton, of Tockenham. The Committee desire once more to 
impress on all Members of the Society that the Hon. Librarian 
will thankfully receive any and all papers, books, pamphlets, 
deeds, prints, and illustrations, however unimportant in themselves, 
; whether new or old, if they are connected with the County of 
; Wilts. In accordance with leave given to the Librarian at a 
previous General Meeting, a certain number of odd vohinios of 
sets of books, not in any way connected witli the county, have 
been sold out of the Library. 

'' E.ir.Kvations. — A considerable amount of work was iloiio at OM 
Saruni duriuLi; Lhi^ latter nionth.s of the suniinor and autumn of 
1910, and th(^ foundations of the ('astl(\ with its LcanUu-olu' pits, 
and the site of tlie well, iiave now been largely laid l»aro. Sub- 
scribers to the l^jxcavation Fund receive full n^ports kA tlio w.»ik 
annually. At Avobuiy Mr. W. St. George Gray rcsunitMl in May, 
11911, the excavations on l)olialf of the I'ritish Assot-iation, which 



330 The Fifty-Eighth General Meeting. 

had been begun in 1908 and 1909. The Wiltshire Archaeological 
Society is not in a position as a rule to make grants from its funds 
either towards works of excavation or of restoration, but a sum of 
£17 4s. 6c?. was subscribed this year by eight Members of the 
Society as a contribution towards the work, which it was hoped 
might have been finished this year. Unexpected difficulties, how- 
ever, arose and prevented this from being done, and after the 
clearing out of another section of the ditch, the bottom of which 
proved to be 18ft. below the present level of the soil, the work 
was abandoned for the year, and the Wiltshire contributions were 
banked, to be used, it is hoped, when the present difficulties have 
been overcome. Mr. and Mrs. Cunnington carried their excavation 
of the ditches and pits of the interior earthworks of Casterley 
Camp a stage further in the autumn of 1910, and have this year 
(1911) been engaged on certain pits in a field below Eybury 
Camp, remarkable for the great number of Sarsen muUers dis- 
covered on its surface. Full accounts of this work will appear in 
due time in the Magazine. 

"Certain barrows on the borders of Wilts and Berks were opened 
during 1910 by Mr. Peake, of Newbury. It is hoped that the 
results of these excavations also may be printed. 

'' PuUications.—Dm'mg 1910 Part II. (pp. 65—121) of the Wilt- 
shire Inquisitiones post mortem from the reig^i of Edward III, was 
issued to Members, as well as Numbers 113 and 114 of the Magazine 
being the two last parts of vol. xxxvi., including a very full Index. 
Altogether in 1910 Members received 585 pages of Wiltshire 
material, a larger amount than has ever before been issued by the 
Society. The whole of the Members have thus directly benefitted 
by the existence of the Museum Maintenance Fund, which has 
relieved the pressure on the General Fund, and by the success of 
the two recent Annual Meetings. The Society has to thank Mr. 
E. Towry White, F.S.A., for the kind gift of £2 2s. towards the 
€Ost of illustrating his paper in the Magazine. 

" The Annual Meeting at Calne was, thanks largely to Dr. 
Ferguson's work as Local Secretary, a great success, and, as has 
been said, the balance handed to the Society was larger even than 



The Report, 331 

that of the l>iadford Meeting the year before. There is every 
prospect that this year's Meeting, at Malmesbury, with the Rev. 
F. H. Manley and Mr. C. F. Moir for Local Secretaries, will be no 
less a success than its immediate predecessors. 

"The Committee recommend that the Kev. W. Symonds be 
appointed Local Secretary for the Tetbury neighbourhood, and 
that the Kev. E. H. Goddard be appointed the Society's represen- 
tative on the Wootton Bassett Town Trust, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Mr. N. Story Maskelyne. 

"ED. H. OODDPlKD, Hon. Seer 

MR. W. HEWARD BELL, speaking on the Report, said that he did 
not think that it was generally recognised what an extremely 
valuable work was being done in Wiltshire by Mr. and Mrs. 
Cunnington. By their systematic excavations of Wiltshire Camps 
they were opening up new avenues of knowledge as to the past 
history of the country, and shedding light on what had been very 
obscure hitherto. Having paid a tribute to the memory of the 
late Mr. N. Story Maskelyne, Mr. Bell congratulated the Society 
on the satisfactory nature of the Report, and more especially on 
the condition of the Museum, which would well hold its own with 
almost any of the provincial Museums of the country. 

Three new Members having been elected, the Officers of the 
Society were re-appointed, with the addition of The Rev. W. 
Symonds as Local Secretary for the Tetbury neighbourhood, with 
a seat on the Committee. The recommendation of the Committee 
that tlie Rev. E. H. Goddard should HI I the [)lace on the Wootton 
Bassett Town Trust hitherto occupied by the late Mr. N. Story 
Maskelyne was also ap])rovetl. The Members, of whom forty-two 
were present at lh(i meeting, then made their way to the Hospital 
of St. John, ami to the cuiious little old Town Hall btdiiiid. on tlie 
site of which, as CANON MACMILLAN said, in explaining the 
history ol' the building and Ihti customs and privilegi\s of ihc 
Freemen of Malmesbury, in all ])i(>baliilily the frcciucn had met 
ever since the days when Kin- Alhclstau liisl 'j;a\-c thcui the land 
which they still hold. This hmd liaNin'j, hccu I'fcc fioni rates since 



332 The Fifty-Eighth General Meeting. 

Athelstan's days, is now proposed to be rated for the first time by a 
levelling County Council, which apparently cares nothing for the 
preservation of one of the most interesting evidences of historical 
continuity to be found in the whole of England. 

Thence the Members walked to the Abbey Church, where they 
were met by MR. H. BRAKSPEAR, F.S.A., who in an interesting 
discourse on the building, touched on various points on which new 
evidence had lately come to light — such, for instance, as the date 
of the fall of the central spire, evidence which will, it is hoped, 
shortly be published. He also described the result of certain ex- 
cavations recently made by him on the site of the cloister to the 
north of the church, and poured contempt on the theory of the 
"Watching Loft" on the south side of the nave. It was, he 
asserted, neither more nor less than an organ loft for the small 
" pair of organs " of the 14th century. Thence the party, num- 
bering sixty-eight, passed on into the garden of the Abbey House, 
where, by the kindness of MR. E. S. MACKIRDY, the owner, the 
tea given by the Committee was arranged. What remains of the 
vaulted undercroft on which the house is built, possibly originally 
that of the infirmary, was visited, and then the Members separated, 
some visiting a house on the north side of Oxford Street, with a 
most unpromising exterior, now occupied by Mr. Lockstone as a 
grocer's shop, which contains, running right up from the cellar to 
the roof, a remarkably interesting wooden staircase of about the 
time of James 11. 

THE ANNIVERSARY DINNER of the Society was held at the 
Bell Hotel, at 7, p.m., MR. W. HEWARD BELL being in the chair, 
in the absence of the President, and at 8.30 the Members assembled 
at the Council Chamber for the Conversazione, fifty-five being 
present. Proceedings opened with an address by THE REV. W. 
SYMONDS, on "PARISHES LOST TO WILTSHIRE," after which 
THE REV. E. H. GODDARD gave a short account of the very 
interesting series of Church plate from neighbouring parishes which 
had been got together for exhibition, and on the four beautiful 
maces of Malmesbury, which, together with some of their old 



The Report. 333 

deeds, were exhibited by the freemen. He took the opportunity 
of expressing the hope that^these old deeds, which have never been 
copied or properly edited, miglit be placed in the hands of some 
competent authority for examination. They might contain much 
that was valuable for the history of Malmesbury. After an in- 
terval for tea and music — the latter kindly provided by Miss 
Sharpe, THE REV. F. H. MANLEY read an entertaining paper on 
THE MALMESBURY PARISH REGISTERS. 

Quite a number of interesting and valuable objects had been 
arranged for exhibition in addition to the Borough and Church 
plate mentioned above — Bronze implements, and Palaeolithic and 
jSTeolithic flint implements, by Mr. A. D. Passmore; the Standard 
Y'^ard and Ell of Malmesbury, dated 1654 and guaranteed as correct 
in 1893 ; Pottery fragments from the curious mound near the 
churchyard at Great Somerford, excavated by the Eev. F. H. 
Manley, who also exhibited many good spoons of silver and latten, 
&c. ; books, prints, photographs, &c. ; and a number of specimens 
of lace and embroidery, together with a curious early verge watch 
in a small oblong crystal case, a beautiful miniature of Mrs. 
Brinsley Sheridan, and other objects of interest exhibited by the 
Misses Pitt. The four splendid volumes of the great MS. Bible, 
arranged as a lectionary, with its Flemish fifteenth century minia- 
tures, from Cole Park, which had figured as the chief exhibit at 
the previous Malmesbury Meeting, were again most kindly lent.^ 
There were also exhibited by Mrs. Luce a number of samples of 
lace made in Malmesbury, apparently all of them identical with 
Buckinghamshire patterns. This industry has been recently hap- 
pily revived by the efforts of ladies of tlie neighbourhood. Another 
interesting ()l)je{'t was a silver cup, exhi])ited by ihe Misses Hanks. 
I It is a })hiin g()l)leL-.shaped v\\\), without ornament, exc'e])t that to 
! one side of the liowl, close to the lip, is attached an a[)})le with 
leaf and stem in high relief. On the l)Owl is this inscription: — 
"Till' (Jift of Edinniul Kstroiiit Ks<|. to ^\ Sti-]." Matli.-ws Cai-ital 
IJurgcss as a ni.irk of Gratitude for his steady sui)i)ort at the Eleetion 
of Hi;:,^h Steward of the Borou;,'h of Malmesbury in the Year 1SU4 when 
the nine Apples triumjjh'd over the four Crabs." 

1 For (h'vcri|.ti.ui of tlu-se $rr ir.J.l/., xxxi., 120. 



334 The Fifty-Eighth General Meeting. 

The Kev. W. Symonds on the succeeding night explained the 
circumstances under which similar cups were presented by Edmund 
Estcourt, Esq., to nine out of the thirteen voters of Malmesbury 
who voted at the election to the office of High Steward of Malmes- 
bury in 1804, to commemorate "the triumph of \h& nine ap'ples 
over the four crabs." In that year Mr, Edmund Estcourt, of 
Lasborough Park, Solicitor to the Stamp Office, was elected in 
succession to Dr. Wilkins, to the ofiPice of High Steward. There 
were thirteen voters (the Alderman and twelve Capital Burgesses), 
of whom four (crabs) voted for Lord Peterborough, and the other 
nine (apples) for Mr. Estcourt. A similar cup is in the possession 
of one of the Vice-Presidents of the Meeting. The effect of the 
election was to put the borough into Mr. Estcourt's pocket, whose 
two nominees, Messrs. Ladbrooke and Colbourn, retained their 
seats in 1806 in spite of the famous Malmesbury Election Petition 
of that year. {See Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 292.) 

Another interesting exhibit amongst the Church plate shown was 
the chalice of St Mary's, Westport, Malmesbury. This is a good 
example of the plain baluster stemmed straight sided, short bowled. 
Commonwealth cup, of which there are but few specimens in the 
county. It was unknown to the compilers of The Church Plate of 
Wilts in 1891. It has the letters P. M. with E above them, 
pounced on the side of the bowl just under the lip. It bears the 
date letter for 1654 and the maker's mark E.S with mullet above 
and below. It measures 5|in. in height, 3Jin. diameter at the top, 
and 3f in, diameter at the base. The circumstances of its discovery 
were remarkable. It was known to have existed but had dis- 
appeared for over thirty years, until a few months ago, when the 
sexton accidentally taking up an old pewter flagon kept in the 
Church chest (and also undescribed in Church Plate of Wilts), and 
turning it upside down, out fell the chalice. It is a notable ad- 
dition to the Church plate of the county. 

THUESDAY, JULY 6th. 

The Excursion for this day was, except for the two places (Long 
Newnton and Ashley), visited at the end of the day, wholly over 



Thursday, July Qth. 335 

the Gloucestershire border, and in a country new to the great 
majority of the fifty-five Members and Associates who took part 
in it. Two motor busses and several private motors left the Bell 
Hotel at 9.20 and proceeded to SHIPTON MOYNE, where the 
REV. W. SYMONDS, who had taken the entire responsibility for 
this day's Excursion, described the remarkable series of tombs and 
effigies which have happily survived the rebuilding of the Church. 
Thence the route lay to DOUGHTON, where the fine old Manor 
House, built probably in 16*jJ7, belonging to Mr. A. C. Mitchell, 
and now a farm house, was visited. The next stoppage was at 
CALCOT, where the barn of what was once a grange of the Wilt- 
sliire Cistercian Abbeyof Kingswood,with its inscriptions,recording 
its building in 1300, and its re-building in 1728, together with the 
very rudely sculptured head of a Eoman tombstone built into the 
wall, were seen. BEVERSTON CHURCH was next visited, with 
its stone pulpit, partly original, of the fourteenth century ; and 
then the party adjourned to the Castle and thoroughly examined 
that very interesting structure from top to bottom, under MR. 
SYMONDS' very able guidance. Then back again to TETBURY, 
which apparently possessed no special features of interest of its 
own, beyond the attraction of luncheon at the White Hart Hotel, 
to which some fifty-five Members sat down. Leaving Tetbury at 
2 p.m. the motors proceeded to CHAVENAGE HOUSE/ wliere 
MR. AND MRS. LOWSLEY WILLIAMS received the Society with 
much kindness and hospitality, throwing the very interesting house 
with its adjoining chapel open for their inspection. AYENING 
CHURCH was the next point visited, a building full of interest, 
with good Norman work, and built in among other fragments in 
the west wall of the north aisle part of a very small coped Pre- 
Norman gravestone of the same character as that in the porch of 
St. Sani[)son's, CrickhuU^ 

Climbing u\) Llie hill nut, of Avening, tlit^ louti' lay onci^ more 
through Tetbury and on to IA)NG XKWNTON CHl'KCH, re-built 
in 1840 and 1870, but retaining tlit; three western bays (»f the 

' Sir /Irisf'if (HI, I aioKc. Arrh. Soc. 7'r'iiis., xxii. 



336 The Fifth- Eighth Ge7ieral Meeting. 

south arcade (cir. 1200) and some interesting brasses, &c., which 
were described by the Eeetor, THE REV. F. WRANGHAM, who, 
in conjunction with THE REV. W. SYMONDS, afterwards most 
kindly entertained the Members at tea in the garden of the 
Rectory, with its beautiful park-like view. After tea a ten 
minutes' drive brought the party to ASHLEY CHURCH, where 
the Rector, THE REV. J. L. REDFERN, read a series of notes on 
the architecture by MR. C. E. PONTING, F.S.A. ASHLEY MANOR, 
an interesting old house, close by, was then visited, by kind per- 
mission of Mr. Holborow. Leaving Ashley at 6.10 the motor busses 
arrived at Malmesbury at 7 p.m., a quarter-of-an-hour late, after 
an Excursion which everyone agreed had been a delightful one, 
through country which was quite new to most of those who joined 
in it. 

At 8.30 the Evening Meeting was held at the Council 
Chamber, twenty-six Members only being present, with MR. C. 
PENRUDDOCKE, in the absence of the President, in the chair. 
THE REV. E. H. GODDARD read a paper by MRS. STORY 
MASKELYNE, "NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF WROUGHTON," 
and THE REV. W. SYMONDS read a part of a paper by MR. V. R. 
PERKINS on "KINGSWOOD ABBEY." ' 

At the conclusion the Chairman thanked the readers of the 
papers, and Miss Sharpe and the other musicians who had en- 
livened the proceedings with music. 

FRIDAY, JULY 7th. 

Leaving Malmesbury at 9.15 the motor busses went first to 
CRUDWELL CHURCH, where, as throughout this day's Excursion, 
THE REV. E. H. GODDARD called attention to the principal 
points of interest in the building — the remarkable series of 
sixteenth century bench ends and the glass of the window in the 
north aisle still containing remains of representations of five of 
the seven sacraments which once filled it. The architectural 
history of this Church presents many interesting and puzzling 
features and has never yet been properly worked out. From 
/Printed in Proc. Clifton Ant. Club, iii., 217. 



Friday, July 7th. 337 

Crudwell a short journey brought the party to EASTCOURT HOUSE, 
in the same parish, where MRS. RANDOLPH received them and 
took the greatest pains to shew them everything of interest tliat 
the house contains, whilst liglit refreshments fortified the Members 
for the further labours of the morning. Ttie most notable features 
of the house are the very fine staircase, reaching from the cellars 
to the attics, with royal and other arms amongst its decoration ; 
the room at the foot of the stairs, now used as a smoking room, 
with good coeval panelling; two or three rooms upstairs with 
plainer panelling of various dates; and in one of the bedrooms an 
elaborate mantelpiece with the arms of Earle, the builders of the 
house {fJu^ee escallops), a figure of "G E" with his hand upon the 
head of his eldest son, and three smaller children on one side, 
whilst his wife with a baby in arms stands on the other. There 
is also a sliip (the Earles were l>ristol mercliants), and a model of 
the house, dated 1662. 

The next item on the programme was OAKSEY CHURCH,' and 
then KEMBLE CHURCH," after which the party, numbering 
now fifty-one, were quite ready to sit down in the very 
commodious village hall, kindly placed at their disposal by 
LORD BIDDULRH, to the excellent luncheon provided by the 
Kemble Co-operative Association. Leaving Kemble at 1.15 
SHORNCOTE^ was reached at 1.40, and the charming little 
Church, so unspoiled by restoration, was visited and admired 
whilst the motor busses and private motors spent the interval in 
extricating themselves from the tangle in which they were wound 
up in the narrow lane leading to the i)lace. SOMlMIFOin) 
KEYNES CHURCH,^ with its remarkable Saxon doorway, was 
then visited. Less than half-an-hour's drive from this i)()int 
brought the party to ASHTON KEYNES CHURCH, wIumv the 
most notable, fealurc is the rereilos of ihi; alLar. which once stood 
ill th(^ rood loft over the iioith aish'. Ml^■l■:'^^ ( 'lit ■ KCIl,' with 
its Jacobean seats and pulpit, and lil'teeiitli century ticrcens and 



> S^>' ir/7/.< Arc//. M<i<i., xxvii., ?,\\. 

•ir. A. J/., xxvii.. ac. 

3 ir.d..l/., xxvii., ■1[. '■ ////'/, xxvii., I'T, //;/. '//'/'/, xxvii.. lio. 



338 The Fifty-Eighth General Meeting. 

fine original door, its brass candelabra, and fragments of a Saxon 
cross shaft, was the last Church on the programme, on leaving 
which the busses made for CHARLTON PARK, where MR. BATES 
received the party on behalf of THE EARL AND COUNTESS 
OF SUFFOLK, with every attention, the house being freely 
thrown open for their inspection, after tea — which was par- 
ticularly welcome at the end of a very hot day — had been 
enjoyed under the portico. Since the Society last visited Charlton 
in 1900, considerable alterations have taken place in the way of 
decoration, particularly in the long gallery, which has recently been 
furnished throughout with new panelling of an elaborate character. 
The great attraction of the house, however, remains — as always — 
the pictures, second only in this county to the still more remarkable 
series at Longford. Ample time was spent in the enjoyment of 
these before the busses started on the final stage to Malmesbury 
Station, which they reached with more than half-an-hour to spare 
before the 6.55 train. The weather had been cloudless throughout 
the Meeting, and for the most part very hot ; the numbers attending 
had not been so large as at either of the preceding meetings at 
Calne and Bradford, but everyone who took part in it agreed that 
the Malmesbury Meeting and Excursions had been a great success, 
a success chiefly due to the excellence of the arrangements made 
by the two Local Secretaries, THE REV. F. H. MANLEY and 
MR. C. MOIR, and so far as the Gloucestershire day was concerned, 
■ to the arrangements and guidance of THE REV. W. SYJVTONDS, 
who had made himself entirely responsible for that Excursion. 
From the point of view of finance the result of the Meeting was 
highly satisfactory, a balance of £14 Os. ^d. having been handed 
over to the Society's General Fund. 



339 



THE 
BURIAL PLACES OF THE BISHOPS OF SALISBURY. 

By A. R. Malden, F.S.A. 

During the time that the Cathedral of Salisbury stood at what 
is now called Old Saruni tliere were six Bishops of Salisbury, not 
including Richard Poore who built the present Cathedral. 

The first Bishop of Old Salisbury was Herman, a Fleming by 
birth, wlio united the two sees of Ramsbury and Sherborne into 
one at Salisbury. Herman died in 1078, and I do not know of 
any record of his burial place. In the Osmund Register there is 
an account of the translation of the remains of former bishops from 
the old to the new Cathedral, but Herman's name is not mentioned. 
The old Cathedral was barely began when he died and it seems to 
l)e more probable that he found a resting place at Sherborne, wliere 
he usually lived, than that he was buried at Salisbury. There is a 
plain tombof early date made of Purbeck marble standing near the 
west end of the present Cathedral, which is often called the tomb 
of P>ishop Herman, but for this ascription I know of no authority, 
and the common tradition must not be accepted as certainly true. 

St. Osmund succeeded Herman in 1078, and died in 1099. He 
was buried in the Cathedral that he had built at Old Sarum. By 
the year 1225 the east end of the new Cathedral had been com- 
pleted so far as to allow of the consecration of the Lady Chapel, 
and Bishop Richard Poore foreseeing that the new Cathedral would 
not be completed in his own time, and fearing that after his death 
the zeal of his successors might wax cold and the building of the 
new Cathedral be discontinucMl, and a I'oturn niiulc tt» (he old one. 
began to ])ull down the ('atluHlral at Old Saruni, and in 122l) lh<' 
l)odies of St. O.smund and his two successors, Roger and docidin. 
were brought thence and r(^-huri(Ml in the new Cathoilral. .*^t. 
Osmund's ])]ac(' of Imrial is said to havo boon in iho niiddlo (^\ iho 
Lady ('ha])o], Imt acrording to Loland his lirst ionil> was en iho 



340 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury. 

south side " while the shrine was a makyng." This is near where 
the stone with the date MXCIX is now placed on the bench 
between the Lady Chapel and the south aisle of the choir, at the 
end of which St. Stephen's altar formerly stood. In later times^ 
when St. Osmund began to acquire the reputation of sanctity, a 
shrine was erected, and it is probable that the tomb now standing 
on the bench of the nave under the third arch from the east be- 
tween the nave and the south aisle is a part of St. Osmund's shrine. 
This tomb is called in the guide books that of Lord Stourton. Thi& 
is a mistake, which I think must have arisen from Lord Stourton's 
tomb having stood near to that of St. Osmund in the Lady Chapel. 
Lord Stourton was executed in 1557, but the dace of this tomb is 
many centuries earlier than that ; moreover there are on each side 
of it three openings, or " foramina," quite large enough to admit a 
man's head and shoulders ; openings of this kind are usual in 
shrines, their purpose being for the exhibition of relics ; and in the 
account of the miracles of St. Osmund we are told of miraculous 
cures following the insertion of the head and hands of the sufferer 
in the " foramina " of St. Osmund's tomb. The translation of St. 
Osmund was celebrated on the 16th of July and his obit and de- 
position on the 4th of December. 

The successor to Sfc. Osmund was Roger (1107 — 1139), sometimes 
called The Greac. Bishop Eoger was first buried at Old Sarum 
and his bones were brought thence, with those of Osmund and 
Jocelin to the new Cathedral. On the bench between the nave 
and the south aisle, at the west end of the Cathedral, there are 
two effigies of bishops which are usually considered those of Bishops 
Eoger and Jocelin, while there is a difference of opinion as to which 
of them either effigy represents. These two effigies were in their 
present positions before Wyatt's alterations, and in the plan of 
the Cathedral made about 1733, a copy of which is prefixed to 
Chambers' Divine Worship in England in the xiiith, xivth and 
xixth Centuries^ Bishop Roger's resting-place is marked as being 
under an arch in the north wall of the north choir aisle. Under 
this arch is a grave covered by a slab with a plain cross upon it, 
beneath which, resting on the bench, is a skeleton without a head. 



By A. It. Maiden, FXA. 341 

The slab became loose a few years ago and was removed for re- 
fixing, and I examined the grave and failed to find any trace of 
chalice, paten, or pastoral staff, whicli might be expected in the 
grave of a bishop. The skeleton was not disturbed and T am 
inclined to think that this was a case of a double burial on the 
same spot, that the original interment was under the bench, and 
that the bones which I saw were those of a second burial. The 
absence of the head suggested that these might be the bones of the 
Duke of Buckingham, beheaded in Salisbury by Richard HI. His 
head was sent to London, and his trunk may have been hastily 
buried in the Cathedral by his brother-in-law, Bishop Lionel 
Widville. This, however, is mere conjecture. Another reason 
for thinking it more probable that this slab in the wall of the north 
choir aisle covers Bishop Eogei's remains than that he lies at the 
extreme west end, are that the western part of the Cathedral was 
not built until nearly forty years after Roger's bones were tran- 
slated from Old to New Salisbury, and it is not likely that there 
would have been a second re-burial in the new Cathedral. His- 
obit was celebrated on the 11th of December. 

Bishop Jocelix (1142 — 1184) was the third Bishop whose bones 
were brought from the old Cathedral, but I can find no record of 
where they were deposited. As before mentioned, one of the 
sepulchral efftgies at the south side of the west end of the nave is 
usually ascril)ed to him, and if either of tliem is his I think it 
must be the easternmost one of the two, upon which is an in- 
scription referring to the noble birth of the person represented, a 
reference which seems to be more applicable to Bishop Jocelin than 
to any other of the early l)ish()ps except St. Osmund. If this is 
his etligy it must have been removed fioni some part of the 
Cathedral further east because, as before mentioned, the west part 
n{ the Cathedral was not built when Jocelin's bones were broii'^ht 
fiom Old Saruin. Tht^ Lady Chapel was lh(M)nlypart ihtMi tiiiished 
and 1 think his ^a'avt^ may ha\'(» Ixmmi one of iho [Iwoo whii-h wow 
lound west of the Lady Chaptd ht^hind l\\c high altar in ISOO 
|iossil)ly that on the south side, in which a chalice was fouinl. His 
<iliit. was cadchratcd on tlio ISih nf Xo\-cmhcr. 



342 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salishury. 

Hubert Walter (1189 — 1193) was Bishop of Salisbury for 
barely four years, and it is doubtful if he ever resided there at all. 
He was translated to Canterbury in 1193 and died in 1205 at 
Teynham, in Kent, and was buried "Under one of the windows 
on the south side of the ambulatory of the Chapel of St. Thomas 
or Trinity Chapel in the Cathedral Church of Canterbury and 
opposite to the monument of Archbishop Courtenay " (W. H. St. 
John Hope). His tomb was opened a few years ago, when Mr. 
Hope communicated to the Society of Antiquaries an account of 
what was found. ^ The tomb contained, besides the body of the 
Archbishop, his crozier, chalice, and paten, the two latter of the 
middle of the twelfth century and evidently made for use, and 
not only as funeral furniture, which was often the case. The vest- 
ments, clothes, buskins, and sandals, were well preserved and of 
the greatest interest, some of them being the only early examples 
known. Mr. Hope says that tlie tomb was probably set up by 
the Archbishop's friend and executor, Elias de Derham, who was 
a Canon of Salisbury and the architect of Salisbury Cathedral. 
He was also one of the builders of the shrine of St. Thomas k 
Becket. The lid of the tomb is formed of slabs of Purbeck marble 
and has sloping sides and ends like the roof of a house; it is 
moulded along all the edges and wrought with six square lozenges, 
four in front and one at each end, those in front being connected 
by moulded circles. Each lozenge contains within a quatrefoil a 
head carved in high relief. 

Herbert Poore (1194 — 1217), the next bishop, is believed to 
have died at Wilton and to have been buried there, but no me- 
morial of him is known to exist. Canon Eich-Jones thought it 
possible that one of the thirteenth century effigies in the Cathedral, 
which there is a difficulty in identifying, might be that of Herbert 
Poore. His obit was celebrated on the 7th of January. 

EiCHARD Poore (1217 — 1229) succeeded his brother and at 
once took steps for the removal of the see from Old Sarum and for 
the building of the present Cathedral. He was translated to 

^ Yetustata Monumenta^ Vol. VII., part I. 



By A. E. Maiden, KS.A. 343 

Durham in 1229 and died in 1237. The old authorities all agree 
that he was buried, in accordance with his own wish, at Tarrant 
Crawford, in Dorsetshire, where he was born, and where he liad 
founded, or re-founded, the convent for which lie wrote the code 
of rules called the " Ancren Eiwle," and where he retired to die. 
When Leland visited Salisbury in 1540 he saw a tablet in the 
Lady Chapel with an inscription stating that Eichard Poore's heart 
was buried at Tarrant but his body at Durham, but llobert de 
Graystanes, the Durham historian, who lived less than a hundred 
years after Richard Poore, says that he was buried at Tarrant, 
llichardson, the editor of the 1743 edition of Godwin's Presides 
says that he was buried at Salisbury ; what was his authority I do 
not know, but the statement contradicts Godwin's own statement 
in the editions of his book which were published in his lifetime. 
I tliink there is no doubt that the ancient authorities are right 
and that Tarrant was tlie place of his burial. His effigy, under a 
canopy, lies near to the altar in the Cathedral on the north side. 
Canon Eich-Jones doubted if this effigy really represents Eichard 
Poore, but I think upon insufficient grounds, and I prefer to adhere 
to tlieold tradition. He died on the 15th of April, 1237, but his 
name does not appear in the Obit Kalendar. 

Egbert Bingham (1229 — 1246) was buried on the north side of 

the presbytery, where there is a large tomb surmounted by an 

arch. The top sliows the matrix of a brass which was a half-length 

mitred figure with a crozier. In 1900 this tomb was opened by 

the partial removal of tlie top slab. The coffin rested upon the 

stone bench and was of wood with an outside covering of thin UmJ. 

The top liad fallen in and when the lead was bout back there were 

seen a chalice lying on its side near the left shoulder of the body, 

a wooden crozier, and a metal buckle, also the bone of the left arm, 

:i'' thiL;li bone, and [)art of the vertebrre. The body was covered 

I'V a dark liiider-likc siihsLance that crunibliMl on being touched 

and seemed to be the remains of vestments. Canon Uicli-Jone.s 

did not b(dieve this tomb to bo that of Bisliop Ijingham, but assigned 

• him that which is giMuuMlly thouglit to be that of Eichard Poore, 

'..;iviiig ;is a reason that IJi.shop l>ingh;un's tomb is said by all 

vol.. x\x\ii. — NO. cxvii. 2 K 



344 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury. 

authorities to be on the north side of the high altar, the position^ 
occupied by the tomb generally ascribed to Eichard Poore. Canon 
Kich-Jones, when he gave this reason, forgot that the high altar 
was formerly placed further west than it is now, in fact just 
opposite to the tomb that I think is Bishop Bingham's. Elsewhere 
Canon Eich-Jones particularly asserts his belief in this change of 
position of the high altar. Bishop Bingham's obit was celebrated 
on the 3rd of November. 

There seems to be no difference of opinion as to the position of 
the tomb of William of York (1247 — 1256), or, as he is called in 
the Obit Kalendar, William of Wilton. It is on the south side of 
the presbytery opposite to that of Bishop Bingham. It was near 
to the altar of St. John, that is, St. John the Evangelist, as the 
altar of St. John the Baptist was elsewhere. The tomb is said to 
have been gilded, but no trace of gold remains, and it may have 
been only the iron grille-work which fills up the arch over the 
tomb which was so adorned. This iron work is now painted 
black, but under the black are traces of red. William of York's 
obit was celebrated on the 31st of January. 

Bishop Giles be Bridport (1257 — 1262) was buried on the 
north side of the Chapel of St. Mary Magdalene, which was in the 
south-east transept of the Cathedral on the north side. His 
monument is, perhaps, the most beautiful one in the Cathedral r 
part of it is supposed to represent the west front of the Cathedral, 
which was finished in his episcopate. There is a small shield on 
the south side of the tomb, now blank, but formerly bearing the 
bishop's arms, Azure a cross or between four bezants, although Bed- 
ford, following Cassan, assigns him other arms. His obit was on. 
the 13 th of December. 

Walter de la Wyle (1263 — 1271), founder of the Collegiate 
Church of St. Edmund, was buried in the Chapel of St. Edmund 
of Canterbury, which occupied the middle of the east side of the 
north-west transept of the Cathedral. Bishop de la Wyle's monu- 
ment was removed from its original position by Wyatt and placed 
on the bench on the south side of the nave under the second arch 
west of the tower. His obit was celebrated on the 4th of January^ 



By A. R. Maiden, F.S.A. 345 

according to the Obit Kaleiider. Lelaud puts it on the 20th of 
September, but as his accompanying statement is wrong in otfier 
particulars there cannot be much doubt that he is incorrect. 

Robert de Wikeeiampton (1274 — 1284), according to the 
Lambeth MS., No. 589, "sepultus iacet in Australi parte capellai 
B. Virginis," that is, lies buried in the south part of the Lady 
Chapel. All the other authorities which mention liis burial-place 
agree with this statement, and in the plan of the Cathedral in 
Cough's Sep^dchral Momcments his grave is marked close to the 
the east end of the Lady Chapel, just south of the altar, and I think 
this may be accepted as his burial-place. His obit was on the 
24th of April. 

Walter Scammell (1284 — 1286), according to the Lambeth 
MS. No. 589, was buried " contra capellam Salve Kegina prope 
altare reliquiarum." Canon Rich- Jones thought that the spot 
indicated was near where the Audley Chapel was afterwards built, 
but that would be near neither the Lady Chapel nor the Altar of 
Relics. The Salve was the principal altar in the Lady Chapel, 
and the principal Altar of Relics was the same as that of St. John 
the baptist, in the south bay of the north-west transept. Price 
says he was buried "near the North West Grand Leg" of the 
Tower, he may have made this statement owing to the grave being 
described as being near the Altar of Relics, but it is a long way 
from the Salve. There was, however, at one time another Altar 
of Relics near the tomb of St. Osmund, and if the grave was opposite 
to the Salve it could not have been far from the tomb of St. Osmund, 
and I think that Walter Scammell must have been buried some- 
where in or near the Lady Chapel. His obit was celebrateel on 
the 23rd of September. 

All the authorities agree that Henry of Brandeston (1287 — 
ll^SS) was l)urie(l on the south side of the Lady Chapel. The plan 
in Gough marks his gravid immediately to the west of that of 
K(jljert of Wikehani[)ton, and that no doubt was the ])lace. 

The older authorities say that the burial-place of lii.siior Wir.i.i.wi 
DE LA Corner (1280 — 1291) was "in navi ecclesiaMuter alUiro 
maluLinuni ct SpiiiUis Sancti." The nioniing altar was near 

2 F 2 



346 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury. 

where the Hungerford tomb stands on the north side of the nave, 
and the Altar of the Holy Ghost was where William Longespee's 
tomb is now placed. Seth Ward says "in medio chori/' and so 
does Canon Eich-Jones, but the latter did not notice that in the 
statement which he quotes the words " in medio chori sepultus " 
have been corrected in the margin to " sepult : in nave ecclesise 
inter altar : matutin : Sptus Sancti/' so there is little doubt that 
he lies in the middle of the nave towards the east end. His obit 
was on the 10th of October. 

Nicholas Longespee (1292 — 1297) was buried at the entrance 
of the Lady Chapel near his father, William Longespee " under a 
huge marble stone sometimes inlaid with brasse and adorned with 
the arms of their house " (Godwin.) In the plan of 1733 the tomb is 
placed at the entrance of the Lady Chapel a little west of the grave 
of St. Osmund. Leland says that his stone was between those of 
Eobert de Wikehampton and Henry of Brandeston. The position 
marked on the plan is near William Longesp^e^s tomb, but if that 
position is correct, of which there can be little doubt, it could not 
have been between the graves of Bishops Eobert de Wikehampton 
and Henry de Brandeston, as both of them were on the south side. 
It is said that his heart was buried at Lacock Abbey, and that a 
small slab marked with three crosiers, now lying in the Cloisters, 
once marked the place of its interment. His obit was on the 
18th of May. 

Simon of Ghent (1297 — 1315) was buried " in australi parte 
chori " (Lambeth MS. No. 589). His stone is still in its original 
position in the first arch of the south aisle of the choir behind the 
stalls. His obit was celebrated on the 2nd of April. 

There is considerable doubt as to the burial place of EoGER de 
MoRTiVAL (1314 — 1330). He lies certainly to the north of the 
choir. Price places his grave in the recess in the wall where I 
have before said that I believe the first Bishop Eoger was buried. 
The " Constitutiones," collected in the seventeenth century, places 
the grave of the first Eoger in the third arch from the morning 
altar, but the plan of 1733 marks the grave of Eoger de Mortival 
(or Eoger the second) in that place. The morning altar was on 



By A. R. Maiden, F.S.A. 347 

the iiorfch side of the nave and fclie third arch eastward from it is 
the first arch on the north side of the choir. When the late Mr. 
Fisher was doing some repairs he opened a tomb in that place, 
i.e., behind the first row of choir stalls on the north, and saw a 
chalice and paten therein. Koger de Mortival would doubtless 
have been buried with these symbols, but I think it very likely 
that they would not have been placed in the second grave of Roger 
the drst. As Canon Wordsworth remarks in his Salisbury 
Ceremonies and Processions, it is difficult to pronounce with any 
confidence upon the burial-place of these namesake bishops. His 
obit was on the 14th of March. 

Bishop Egbert Wivil (1330 — 1375) was buried in the middle 
of the choir near the bishop's throne; in this statement all the 
authorities agree. The magnificent brass which was placed over 
his grave has been removed to the Morning Chapel. 

The next bishop, Ealph Erghum (1375 — 1388), was translated 
to Wells, where he died the 10th of April, 1401, and was buried 
iii that Cathedral on the south side of the eastern part of the nave. 

John Waltham (1388 — 1395) was "buried in Westminster 
among the Kings (as in his epitaph is yet to bee read) many men 
much envying him that honour. He died the yeere 1395 and 
lieth just beside King Edward the first under a fiat marble, the 
inscription whereof is (though partly defaced) not yet quite 
perished '* (Godwin). His obit was celel)rated on the 17th of 
September. 

IJiciiAiiD Mi^yrFORi) (1396 — 1407) lies in tlie Chapel of St. 
Margaret, and his tomb, with his ii\'\n^,harry ddiicetty of foii.r yieces 
or sfdde or and azure, stands between the site of tliat chapel, which 
was in the south-west transept, and the south aisle of the choir, 
ininiediately to the right on entering the choir aisle gate. The 
celebration of his obit was on the oth of May. 

XldloLAs Ub'i'.wii'll (1407) was l)isho|) for only three months 

auil was transhitt^d to Wells and there i)uri(>il in a chapel whieh 

hi' hiiill. on tlu^ north side of the navi^ opposite to P>ishoi> Ki-ghum. 

Unr.KiM" ir.vl.VM ( I h)7 --iilT). svho was a eai'dinal, died while 

ath'ndiiiL^ the Council ol' ( \)nstanee, and was hniied in I'onslaii'-e 



348 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury. 

Cathedral, where there is a fine brass over his grave. His obit 
was on the 3rd of September. 

John Chaundler (1417^1426) was buried in the Cathedral, in 
the nave, according to Leland ; I find no other mention of the place. 

Egbert Nevill (1427 — 1438) was translated to Durham and is 
buried in the Nevill Chapel in that Cathedral. 

William Ayscough (1438 — 1450) was murdered by rioters in 
•Cade's rebellion at Edington, Wilts, and was buried on the south 
side of the south aisle of that Church, notwithstanding a direction 
in his will that he should be buried in the Cathedral. 

PtiCHARD Beauchamp (1450 — 1481) built a beautiful chapel on 
the south side of the Lady Chapel and was buried in the middle 
of it. His chapel was ruthlessly destroyed by Wyatt and his tomb 
now stands on the south side of the nave towards the west end. 

Lionel Widville (1482 — 1484) died at Beaulieu Abbey and 
there he was buried, acccording to the " Constitutiones " and an 
old MS. note in a copy of Godwin's Presules that I possess, which 
is very rich in notes relating to Bishops and Canons of Salisbury. 
There is a handsome tomb in the Cathedral between the north- 
west transept and the north choir aisle, which is usually called 
that of Lionel Widville, but I believe it to be the tomb of Dean 
Gilbert Keymer, who was buried in the Cathedral, and had obtained 
permission to build himself a tomb on this spot, and founded a 
chantry at the Altar of Eelics that stood beside it. j| 

Thomas Langton (1485 — 1493) was translated to Winchester 
and was buried in his chantry chapel there. 

John Blith (1494 — 1499) was buried under or behind the high 
altar, his tomb standing behind it, north and south instead of east 
and west. Price says he was commonly called the " Thwart-over " 
Bishop from his body being deposited north and south, but Mihier , 
says this was not the case, that he was buried in the usual direction 
but his monument and figure were placed north and south owing 
to their being fixed against the back of the altar screen His 
tomb now stands at the north end of the north-west transept. 

Henry Deane (1500 — 1501), after a short episcopate, was 
promoted to Canterbury and was buried in that Cathedral, " in 



By A. IL Maiden, F.S.A. 349 

the middle of tlie place called tlie iiiartyrdome" (Godwin). 

Edmund Audley (1502 — 1524) is buried in the beautiful little 
chapel which he built on the north side of the sanctuary. 

Cardinal Laurence Campegio (1524 — 1534) seems never to 
have resided at Salisbury, he was deprived by Act of Parliament 
in 1534 for non-residence, and was buried at liome, " in Our Lady 
Church beyond Tyber.'^ 

Nicholas Shaxton (1535 — 1539) resigned the see some years 
before his death and was buried in the Chapel of Gonville and 
Caius College, Cambridge, of which college he had been fellow. 

John Capon or Salcot (1539 — 1557) was buried on the south 
side of the choir behind the bishop's throne. The bishop's throne 
formerly stood some twenty feet westward of its present position, 
and Capon's tomb now marks the place. 

John Jeavell (1560 — 1571) was buried in the middle of the 
choir opposite to the bishop's throne. When the choir was paved 
with marble, in 1684, his stone was removed to the north-east 
transept, where it now lies near to that of Bishop Wyvil, but 
outside the screen. 

Edmund Gheast (1571 — 1577) was also buried in the choir 
between Bishops Wivil and Jewell, and his stone, with a brass 
was removed to the north-east transept at the same time as Bisliop 
Jewell's. 

John Pieks (1577 — 1582) became Archbishop of York and died 
at Bishopsthovpe and was buried at the east end of York Minster. 

John Coldwell (1591 — 1596) died so deeply in debt owing to 
"his man Mears " keeping his "farm and arrearages" from him 
that " his friends were gUxd to bury him suddiMily and secretly in 
liishop Wivil's Grave," in the middle of the choir. 

IIfa'RY Cotton (1598 — 1615) was buried in the Cathech-al, but 
I in what part of it I do not know. 

RoiiKRT Ar.i'.oT (1615 — 1618) was buried in the CalhtMhal (i[^- 
1 posite the bisho[)'s throne. 

MaPvTIN lM)'i'iiKKr.v (1618—1620) was buried in the ("lancli nf 
All Hallows, Loiubai'd Street. His niouunn'ul was destroyoil in 
(he Kiri^ of London. 



350 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury. 

Egbert Townson(1620 — 1621)wasburied in Westminster Abbey 
in the south ambulatory. He had been Dean of Westminster. 

John Davenant (1621 — 1641) was buried in the south aisle of 
the choir of the Cathedral. 

Brian Duppa (1641 — 1660) was translated to Winchester, and 
was buried in the north ambulatory of Westminster Abbey by 
special command of King Charles II. Brian Duppa had accom- 
panied Charles I. in his imprisonment in Carisbrooke Castle. 

Humphrey Henchman (1660 — 1663) was translated to London, 
where he died in Aldersgate Street. He was buried in Fulham 
Church, on the south side. 

John EArles (1663 — 1665). died at Oxford and was buried in 
Merton College Chapel, near the high altar. His funeral is de- 
cribed at some length by Antony Wood {-Life and Times, ii., p. 66). 

Alexander Hyde (1665 — 1667) lies in the south aisle of the 
nave under a brass which bears an inscription which is thought to 
refer to his having paid for repairs to the Cathedral during the 
Commonwealth. 

Seth Ward (1667 — 1689) was buried in the south aisle of the 
choir ; his monument is in the south-east transept. 

Gilbert Burnet (1689 — 1715) was buried in the Church of St. 
James, Clerkenwell, where he has a monurnent. 

William Talbot (1715 — 1721) was translated to Durham. He 
died in Hanover Square, London, in 1730, and was buried in the 
Church of St. James, Westminster. 

Richard Willis (1721 — 1723) was translated to Winchester. 
He died at Chelsea, 1734, and was buried in the south aisle of 
Winchester Cathedral. 

Benjamin Hoadley (1723 — 1734) was also translated to Win- 
chester and buried there. 

Thomas Sherlock (1734 — 1749) was promoted to the see of 
London. He died 1761 and was buried in the churchyard of 
Tulham Church. 

John Gilbert (1748 — 1756) became Archbishop of York and 
died at Twickenham in 1761, and was buried in the vault of 
Grosvenor Chapel, South Audley Street, London. 



By A. K Maiden, F.S.A. 351 

John Thomas the first (1757 — 1761) was translated to Win- 
chester. He died at Chelsea in 1781, and was buried in Win- 
chester Cathedral. 

The Hon. Eobert Hay Ukummond (1761), after an episcopate 
of only four months at Salisbury, was made Archbishop of York. 
He died at Bishopsthorpe, in 1766, and was buried under the altar 
of the Church there. 

John Thomas the second (1761 — 1766) was buried in the south- 
west transept of the Cathedral, where there is a mural tal)let to 
his memory near the cloister door. 

John Hume (1766 — 1782) was buried by the side of his pre- 
decessor. 

The Hon. Shute Baurington (1782 — 1791) was translated from 
Salisbury to Durham and died, a very old man, in London in 1826. 
He was buried in the south transept of Durham Cathedral. 

John Douglas (1791 — 1807) died at Windsor and was buried 
in St. George's Chapel. 

John Fisher (1807 — 1825) was also buried in St. George's 
Chapel, Windsor. There is a monument to him at the south end 
of the east wall of the south-west transept of the Cathedral, 

Thomas Burgess (1825 — 1837) was buried in the south-east 
transept of the Cathedral, where there is a monument to his 
memory. 

Edward Denison (1837 — 1854), Walter Kerr Hamilton 
(1854—1869), and George Moberly(1869— 1885), were all buried 
in the cloisters. Tombs with efligies of the two last stand in the 
South aisle of ihe choir of the Cathedral. 

John Wordsworth (1885—1911) was buried in Llie ( Iiuk hyard 
nf lU-itford, Wilts. 

'V\\v authorities which I ha\'e chiclly consuUcd in C(»ni}iilinLi- lhi> 
l!>t(>f burial ])lacesare: — Lambeth ]\IS. No. 589; The Salisbuiy 
" Conslitutiones "; Godwin's ''Presides," particularly the copy of 
the sec(jnd edition wliicli I liavc^ already uuMitinucd when treating 
of ])ish()p Widvillc's burial place; Sctli Ward's •• ,\'"////^r " ; the 
Ms. " l^'asti " ol" the early tu^htiMuit li century ; ('ani»n Kicli-.loiies* 
"Fd^fi": and CaicMi W'Didswort li's S<il ishnni Processions ond 



352 The Burial Places of the Bishops of Salisbury, 

Ceremonies. Besides these I have made use of notes which I have 
made at various times during many years past, from episcopal and 
Capitular Eegisters and other MSS., and from a great many books. 
I do not pretend that my conclusions in doubtful cases are all 
correct, but I have spared no pains to arrive at what I believe, 
after carefully weighing and considering the value of conflicting 
evidence, to be the facts. I shall gladly welcome any corrections. 



353 



I 



THE MONTHLY ASSESSMENTS F(JK THE IIELIEF OF 
lEELAND EAISED IN THE DIVISION OF WAliMINSTEK, 

1648. 

Transcribed from the original MS. in the possession of Capt. J. Benett 
Stanford, of Pythouse, by T. H. Bakek. 

The original consists of ten sheets of })archnient 2 feet in length 
and 5^ inches broad. The names are all well preserved and the 
amounts assessed — except a few items which I have marked — down 
to the last folio, when the latter half is missing; apparently this 
consists of one parish, probably Nortli Bradley. The sheets are 
written on both sides. They are here exactly transcribed. It will 
be noticed that many of the totals are wrongly cast up. — T. H. B. 



t 



Here ffolloweth y* monethly assessm*^ taxed rated, & reased w'hin y* 
diuision of warmister f or y*" Releif of Ireland according to an Ordinance 
of Parliam*, By Tho : Benett, Esq""., Edward Middlecott, Ri : Crowch, 
Willni Temple, Tho : Carter & W'" Raddish, gentlemen, & others Com'^* 
appointed for y* same according to y* 20000'' Rate per mensem. 









1648. 








DAMERHAM 


==South bund. 












Dam'liam tithing. 






Mr. Mollis 




s. 
3 


d. 

6 


Robt. Holloway 


s. 

I 


d. 

10 


The Marshes 







5 ob. 


Robty Ivandoll 





I) ob 


Bollshurie tlarme 




3 


G 


Richard Shabden 





7 


Mr. Ed. Hooper 







') ob. 


Mris Yardly 




1 


Barronett Coopers 2 








Mar : Pol ton 





10 ob. 


farmes 




4 


■I ob. 


Tho : hawes 





7 


Hide tt'arnu' 




2 


2 ob. 


John Hunt 


1 


2 


.nicroin T()i)])s faniK 


.V 






.b)liii Trippock 





.') ob 


place 




o 


7 ob. 


Tho : NorthoiuT 





8 ob 


Apofer Budden 




2 


7 ob. 


Mr. ileyniore 


• ) 





Thomas Hnnt 







i) ob. 


Wilhu ('hater 





2 ob 


JRabbinett Hnnt 







7 


.b'hii Stokes 





1 



354 The Monthly Assessments for the Belief of Ireland 



Mr Smith 
Alex : Sanders 
Edward Collis 
Mr. Deere 
Greorge Harris 
John Thomas 
Mr.^mith for a place 
Robt^Holloway 
Willm Low 
Ilenrie Yelf 
Xpofer Budden 
Tho : Hunt 
Richard King 
Eliz : Cooke 
Tho: Bishop 



y. d. 
10 
3 ob. 

3 ob. 

1 3 
7 



8 ob. 
7 
2 ob. 



1 
4 

2 



1 3 ob. 



7 
2 ob. 
5 



s, d. 

Tristram ffoord 2 0> 

Tristram ffoord for a 

place 7 

Xpofer Budden 1 

Xpofer Smith 3 oK 

John_piaper 3 ob. 

Willm Cossens 3 ob. 

Mris Harris 7 

James Hunt 9 ob. 

George Greene 5 ob. 

Mr. Lapp 9 

The Parsonage 4 4 ob. 

Tristram foord 13 

The viccarage 3 6 

Sum— 2'i 14^ 11^. 



MARTIN. 



Mr. Lapp 
The Viccarage 
The Lady Ashlie 
Mris Irone 
Bar : Harris 
Jane Groue vid. 
Barnard Prince 
Alic Harris 
Nicholas Newman 
Edmond Bowne 
Tho : Clarke 
Jo : Sweetapple 
Ed: Starke 
George Read, junr. 
George Weeks 
George Read, senr. 
Willm Compton 
Jone Harris, vid, 
Tho : Holloway 
Jetferie Lanham 
John Jerratt 
John Short 
Vid Compton 
Bar : Compton 
Vid. Parker 
ffrances Weeks 



d. 
3 

8 
2 
2 
5 
1 
5 
5 
2 
2 
7 
2 
5 
2 
7 

10 
5 
10 
7 
2 
10 
10 
2 
7 
10 



















ob. 
ob. 
ob. 





ob. 
ob. 







ob. 
ob. 





ob. 
ob. 





1 10 ob. 



Vid Prince 
frances Street 
WUlm Harris 
WTllm Read 
Sibble Thorne 
An : Holloway 
James Hanham 
Jo : Blanford 
Henry Loxley 
Walter Harris 
Vid : Thorne 
Tho : Holloway 
Oliver Horsey 
Willm Weeks 
John Kent 
Ed : Sweetapple 
Jo : Starke for y" par- 
sonage 
Waltr ffolliott 
Vid. W^hite 
Vid. Goffe 
Mr. Lawes ffarme 
John Groue 
Bernard Blanfford 

Sm— 2'' 9^ 4'\ 



s. d. 

7 ob. 

2 ob. 

3 ob. 
5 
2 ob. 
2 









5 

1 5 ob. 
6 



5 







7 ob. 

2 11 





7 ob. 

8 
ob. 
6 ob. 



10 gf 

6 "^■ 





5 







go 
o <u 

2 ^S 
o •=£■ 

5 2.2 

1 ^1. 



Raised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 



355 



DEUERELL— Laiigbridge, 





s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 


S"". James Thin 


2 


3 


ob. 


Wilhn Marvin 





1 ob. 


Y*^ Lady Thin 


2 








John Gholsey 





3 ob. 


John Ridwood 


1 








Edward (Jldish 





3 


Anne Thin 





8 





John Flobbs 





1 ob. 


Thomas Thin 





8 





John Toogood 





2 ob. 


Michael Beach 


1 


4 


ob. 


Ri : Michener 





1 


Thomas Marvin 


1 








Saloman Read 





4 


Wnim Adlam 


1 


2 





Vid : Hunt 





1 


Willm Hobbs 


1 








Tho : Ad lam 





1 ob 


John Oldish 





5 


ob. 


Robert Hinton 





1 


Lenord Bedborough 





2 


ob. 


Willm Smith 





1 


Edward Baylie 





5 





Vid : Easton 





3 


Edward Baylie 


2 


8 


ob. 


Henry Baker 





1 ob. 


Stephen Chambdin 





10 


ob. 


Vid Corbett 





1 ob. 


Robt Wheeler 





2 





Edward Groom e 





1 


Thomas Oldish 





2 


ob. 


Jo : Gillinghame 





2 


Vid. Mullens 





1 





Richard Star 





4 


Willm Beach 





9 





John Barratt 





4 ob 


Vid. Browne 





1 





Willm Long 





5 


Moses Read 





1 





Henry George 





1 ol^ 


Richard White 





1 


*o 


Vid: Gholsey 





1 


Ste])hen Young 


0^ 


I3|0 


WiTlm Adlam 





2 


Wilhn Haiter 


o' 


1 





John Hobbes 





3 


Tid. Mathew 





2 





Sum 1^' 2 


/ 







COPTON. 










s. d. 




s. 


d. 




Mr. Penruddocke 


11 10 


Roger Barnes 





9 





Mr. Bushell 


3 


Vid: Baylie 


1 


3 





tfraucis ffoord 


6 


Willm Ambros 











James Elliott 


10 ob. 


Willm Jay 


1 


o 





flfra. Millyard 


7 


Richard ffoord 





:> 





Mr. Gomage 


4 ol). 


Richard Gase 





lo 


.)b 


\'id. tfoord 


G 


Robert Xicholas 





C 





llobt. ffoord 


7 ob. 


Mr. Low ct VidDaui 


•11 


,; 





iJobert Gomage 


(; 


\'iil Martin et 1 








liobrrt Kllkiu 


3 


Xpofer Smith J 





'* 





ilichanl luMiie 


3 


Richard Oakc 





1 





•'.lines l\llu't()n 





Sinu 2»;v 


:v\ 







356 



The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland 



MONTON DEU'ELL. 





s. 


d 






s. 


d. 


Keasley ffarme 


4 


6 





John Hooper 





7 


Mr. Poton 





11 





Vid Carrutt 





8 


M"^ Hill 


1 


4 





Ralph Ruddock 





7 


Mr. Westlie 





5 





Stephen Marchant 





4 0' 


The jBfreehold 





10 





Thomas Haiter 





2 


Michael Batt 





8 





Sum ll.». 






Sum totall hund et ) 









Libties 


pi^d 


h VllJ ". 111]% V11J-. 








DUNWORTH HUND. 










ffontill tithing. 








s. 


d. 






s. 


d 


Richard Cantloe 


2 


4 





Tho : Andros 





1 Oq: 


The Parke 


2 


4 





Anthony Sumner 





2 ob.. 


The Woods 


1 


4 





Willm Gerratt 





6 Oq. 


John flfriker 





6 





ffra : Knight 


3 


ob.q. 


M- Turvell 





6 





Vid Edwards 





1 Oq.. 


Henry Lambert 





4 





Vid Helliar 





1 Oq. 


Edmond Bowles 





4 





Tho : Lamperd 





Oq. 


George Bannester 





4 





Richard Macie 





2 ob- 


M' Norrington Reef 


1 


5 





Vid Dauis 





2 ob 


John fi'ricker 





2 


Ob. 


Vid Lavett 





ob. 


M' Cantloe 





7 


ob. 


Vid Perrie 





1 


M^ Dolling 





3 


ob. 


Alex : Dowle 





1 


Vid Dowding 





1 


Oq. 


Tho : Lampert 


f) 


1 


Robt Bowles 





1 


Oq. 


Tho : Ponting 





ob. 


John ffarnell 





2 


ob. 


Sum— 13» 


3d. 





TISBURIE. 



M' Northey viccar 
M' ffoyle 
Mr. Phillipson 
Nicholas Tise 
Mathew Combe 
Edj^ffricker 
Willm Gray 
Oliver Tinker 
Henry Hewstis 
John Turner 
John Scamell 
John Carde 
Willm Cantloe 
Huish Pillchard 
J one Gray 



s d. 

2 1 

3 6 
19 
4 ob. 
2 7 
2 1 ob. 

5 

1 10 ob. 
11 
8 ob. 
8 ob. 
9 
3 
5 ob. 
5 ob. 



John Combe 
William Croome 
Nicholas Carde 
John Targett 
Henry ffezard 
Edward Gotten 
Vid Bisse 
Thomas New 
John Waterman 
Austine Kin 
Edward Card 
Willm Cantloe 
Henry Rose 
John Lever 



8 

2 ob. 
5 
1 

5 ob.. 

3 
3 
4 

4 
4 

6 ob.. 
1 



6 
1 



Sm— j" 3* 6<J. 



^ Note that this total and many of the succeeding totals are wrongly cast 
up in the MS. 



Raised in the Division of Warminster^ 1648. 



357 







STAPLE. 








s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


John Targett 


6 


2 


Willm Bisse 





2 ob. 


Westwood copices 





8 ob. 


Edward Combe 





2 


Willm Lane 





9 


John ffezard 


1 


2 


Xpofer Targett 





7 ob. 


Nicholas Tice 





1 olx 


Thomas Turner 





9 ob. 


John ffricker 





8 


WiUni Combe 





1 ob. 


Eliz : Dauis 





5 ob. 


WiUm Cantloe 





1 ob. 


Larance Bracher 





1 ob. 


John flfeild 





3 ob. 


Jo : Turner, sen' 





6 ob. 


Michael Whettle 





6 ob. 


Willm Pillchard 





6 ob. 


Willm Cantloe 


1 


4 


Edward firicker 





3 


Willm Gray 





8 


An ffricker 


1 


2 


John Targett 





8 


Tho : Cantloe 


1 


6 


Vid Bracher 





6 ob. 


Tho : Cantloe 





4 


Willm Turner 





2 ob. 


Ricjiard Cantloe 





8 a 


John Scamell 





5 


Willm Lampert 





10 


WiUm Browne 





6 


John ffricker 


1 





Vid Gray 





6 


EdAvard Dolling 





4 


John Turner 





6 ol). 


Willm Cantloe 





1 ob. 


Thomas Combe 





2 ob. 


The Parsonage 


6 


6 


George New 





2 


Humphry Cotton 





1 


An Bracher vid 


1 


5 ob. 
HAT 


Sma— ji' 14' 
^CH. 


l^ ot 


. 




s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


Mr. Hyde 


5 


Torn 


Vid Oborne 





7 a; 


Mr. Bennett 


8 


t;one. 


Willm ffricker 


1 


^ 1 


Mr. Nicholas 


1 


5 


John Rose 


1 


Oob 


Henry Hewstis 





8 ob. 


Walter Gray 


1 


3 1 


Roger Scamell 





8 ob. 


& Xpofer Gray 




= 


Tho : Scamell 








John Bisse 





8 1 


^^'illm Sangar 


1 





Edward fl'ricker 





10 


Edward Scamell 





7 


Willm Targett 





2 


Henry Bowles 





2 


Vid Atkins 





1 ob. 


Richard Knight 





5 ol). 


Mr. Rose 





5 ol). 


Richard West 





6 ob. 


John Heustis 





1 (1 


Mr. Chaldecott 


1 


8 


Walter Michel 1 





f) 


Larance Mercer 


1 


2 


Willm Michell 





4 


Roger Simons 





4 


fiarmo' Randall 





?> 


Ri : Hum])hry Jun' 


1 





Willm Sangar 


1 


:\ 


1 Thomas S 





2 


John Willson 




<) II 


Robert Jerrerd 





;> 


Vid Scamell 





\) 


Roger I a; wen 





I ol). 


Thomas Combe 





:. ol.. 


\\\ : Iluini.hry sen' 


:>, 


11 


Mat hew Soynu>r 





•1 


Thonius I'iindie 


-) 


1 


Willm Seamrll 


(t 


r. i.i.. 


1 George Banester 


1 





John Taruftt 





4 


! Willm Gray 


1 


11 


r.inl>..r Mill 





.-. 


t Ed: Sniilli 


2 


<) 


Hol>t ( )l>oriif juii 


I) 


;> () 


Mr. Dollm- 





4 








■ lolm Sraiurll 


^z 


11 l> 


Sum— i!" 16' 


ol). 





358 The Monthly Assessments for the Belief of It evand 









CHISGEOUE. 












s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 




The State pro 12 acres 





4 


Vid : Dauis 





9 





Mr. Eose for high 


wood 





7 


Andrew Simpson 





8 





Mris Mompesson 




4 


3 


Vid. Bracher 





4 





Mr. Davis 




3 


3 


Henry Lawes 


1 


4 





Willm Combe 




2 


7 


WilliT Taylor 


1 








Mr. Bisse 




1 


6 


Tho : ffelltam 





3 


ob. 


Eichard Hailocke 




1 





George Snellgrove 





4 





Mr. South 




1 


2 


Tho : Mercer 








ob. 


An : Targett 




1 


1 


Sum— ji' 0^ 


1\ 







CHILLMAEKE & EIDGE. 





s. 


d. 




s. 


d 


Mr. Sangar pro Eect 


9 


1 ob. 


Tho : Sweet 





1 


Mr. Jesse 


7 


6 


Alice Macie 





1 


Eichard ffitz 


2 


10 ob. 


Mr. Helme 





3 ob. 


Tho : Beckett 


1 


3 


Edith Lane 





1 


Ann Moore 


1 


3 


Jone Macie 





1 


Tho : Helme 





11 ob. 


John Clare 





1 


Willm Moore 


1 


6 


Mr. W- Helme 


2 


4 ob. 


John furnell sen"^ 





4 ob. 


John ffezard 


1 


8 


Jo : flfurnell jun' 


1 


1 ob. 


Willm Lane 





6 


Phillip Dominicke 


1 


1 ob. 


John furnell 





6 


Eichard Macie 





9 


Willm Helme 


1 


8 


Willm Hewlett 





6 ob. 


John Moore sen' 


1 


5 


John Moore 





4 ob. 


Henry ffricker 


2 


2 


John Dauis 





2 


John Moore 


1 


2 ob. 


Mary furnell 





2 








George Snellgar 





2 

SEDG] 


Sma— 2^^ j^ 
iULL. 


9d. 






s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


Mr. An : Bennett 


2 


9 


Wlilm Coward 





9 


Willm Benett 





11 ob. 


Y* parsonage 


1 


2 


Thomas Lide 




10 


Ma : King 


1 


2 


John ffrowd 




5 ob. 


Willm Hillgroue 


1 


5 ob. 


Vid Coward 




5 ob. 


Ei : King de ponds 





n ob. 


Tho : King de Swetwel] 




6 ob. 


Tho : King de Stokland 1 


11 ob. 


Cor. Bowne 




5 ob. 


Nicholas Bowne 





7 


Eobt. Tise 




2 


Ei:King 





1 ob. 


Tho : King de W^m'sh 




3 ob. 


Eobt BiUins 





ob. 


Tho : King de Haise 





10 ob. 


Sum j". 


5d. 





Raised in the Dividon of Warminster, ] 648. 



859 



CHICKLADE. 





s. 


d. 




s. 


d 


Mr. Jo : Marvin 


1 


2 


Michaell Humphrey 





4 


Alex' : Dowle 


1 


2 


Walter Sidnham 





3 


Michael tt'oord 


4 


1 


John Sidnam 





1 ob. 


John ffoord 


2 


4 


John Clement 





2 


Ni : Marvin 


2 


ob. 


Tho : Shergold 





1 


John Hi1)bert 





3 ob. 


Mr. Simpson 


2 


G ob. 


John Ransome 





7 


jyfris Perrie & Georg 






Luke Dyar 





3 ob. 


Ban ester 





1 


Thomas IJright 





4 












TEFFONT. 








s. 


d 




s. 


d 


Capt. Ludlow 


5 





Willm Marshman 





6 


Mr. Phipp 





10 


Thomas Combe 





3 


Willni Haiter 





10 


Waltr_ffitz 





1 ob. 


Austin Haiter 





10 


Willm Easton 





1 ob. 


James Haiter 





8 ob. 


Henry Andros 





1 ob. 


John Pitman 





8 ob. 
BARW 


ICKE. 








s. 


d 




s. 


d. 


Mr. How 


8 


7 


Tho : Jerrad 





3 


Mr. Eborne 


2 


1 


Ruben ffoord 





1 


Edward Cox 


2 


8 


fFra : Barter 





1 


John Turgis 





6 


Tho : Shergold 





1 


Richard West 





G 

SWAl 


[<:lie. 








s. 


d. 




s. 


d 


Mr. South 


17 


2 


Willm Keate 





3 


Wiflm Dew 





8 


Joseph Burton 





3 


Willni Penne 





2 


Ed : Goldstone 





2 


tl'niiicis Jay 
1 





G 

ANS 
d. 

1 


TIE. 






Th(^ tranu(> 


s. 

7 


Robt Best 





d. 
i) 


Edward Daiiis 





.') i 


Rol)t Hiscocke 





1 oh. 


Ed : A'crrctt 





1 ()]). 


iMlward Jerratt 





■o () 


Josei)h lUirton 





r. 


Tliu : Mercer 





3 ob. 


Yi.l na])hctts 





1 (.1). 


Tlid : IJi.-ketts 


I) 


■:, 


Vid Jrtlerie 





(; ..b. 


Willm .Moore 





1 It 


Thomas Ih'att 


o 


(; (.1). 


Kol.t. (Irci'ue 





1 i> 


W ilhn tloord 





!) 


Alrx : Abbott 


I) 


1 nt.. 


Slrplirii Sliort 


() 


:) •• 


W illm Kiiiitc 


(1 


'.• 



\Ml, 



WW II. — NO. CWII. 



360 The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland 





CHARLETON. 




Mr. Ince 


s. d. 
2 5 


Roger Burden 


s. d. 
14 


Mr. ffrie 


3 6 


Tho : Burden 


9 ob 


John Hennie 


12 


Henry flfoote 


9 ob 


Phineas Willis 


5 


Ewans land 


3 ob 


Mr. Sadler 


2 3 


Willm Meggs 


9 ob 


Jolin Brockway 


13 


Edmond Parham 


9 ob 


Mr. Snooke 


1 2 


Robert Mullens 


10 ob 


Mr. Knapton 


14 


Willm Hascall 


6 


Vid Triptree 


9 


Willm Horder 


5 


Thomas Wiatt 


4 


Lenard Jaruis 


1 


Richard Wiatt 


4 


Willm flfreeman 


10 


Vid Hascall 


1 7 ob. 






Edward Rabbetts 


6 ob. 
HAIS 


Sum-j'' 
TON. 


4s 0^. 




s. d. 




s. d. 


Mr. Ince 


2 6 


Vid : Jarvis 


2 


Mr. Moore 


4 6 


John Weekes 


5 


Mr. Joyce 


5 


Robert Dun 


3 


John Gourd 


8 


WilTm Lush 


1 1 


Thomas Burden 


1 2 


Richard Spearing 


3 


John Burden 


8 


Mr. Burleton 


8 


John flfanner 


6 


Abraha Mathew 


10 


Nicholas Knight 


6 


Roger Bugden 


10 


Mr. Weeks 


5 


Edward Bugden 


2 


Mr. Coles 


7 


Vid Hobbs 


8 


Mr. May 


1 6 


Jo : Compton 


2 


John Lush 


17 


John Stayner 


10 


David Spearing 


8 


Mr. Legg 


6 


Thomas Bunter 


8 


Robt Mullens 


2 


Nicholas Pennie 


8 


John Dowland 


10 


Richard ffriker 


8 


Tho : King 


10 


La : Burden 


1 


Sum— j' 


4«. 




DOG^ 


FELL. 






s. d. 




s. d. 


Lord Arundell 


2 


Willm Marks 


2 


Mr. Groue 


4 


Edmond Wilkins 


3 


Mr. Bennett 


14 


Tho : Rabbetts 


7 


Vid Bowen (? Bower) 


2 


ffra : M aine 


3 


Robt Groue 


10 


Ed : Bower 


3 


Valent Abbott 


11 


La : Burden 


6 


Robt Haine 


7 


RelaldWeeke(szc) 


1 


John Pond 


7 


Luke Weeke 


7 



Raised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 



361 



Edmd Lush 
Wilhn Lush 
Wilhn Kerlie 
Vid Lillie 
Tho : Barrett 
Jone Allford 
Mr. Witney 
John Weeks, ]\\i\\ 
Vid Gould 
John Scamell 



Lord Arrundell 

The parsonage 

Mr. Wittney 

Mr. Groue 

Mr. Gould 

Mr. Ro : Groue 

Tho : Cook k K. Rose 

M"" Marlie 

Jo : Coini)ton 

Tho : Stride 

Roger Strong 

Wilhn Kerlie 

Jo : Collins 



Mr. Bay lie vicar 
Mris Chafin vid 
Mr. Greene 
John Glover 
Willin Allford 
John A 1 bine 
Nicholas Maton 
Thomas Rutlie 
Edward Ijidford 
George Brickie 
Ihnirie Bealing 
Rol)t. Pointing 
John Maton 
Austin Goldshorough 
John Doddington 
Vid liowt r 



DOGNELL —continued 
d. 
6 



4 
10 

10 
2 
3 

2 
2 
8 
4 



s. d. 



Will Perman 
]^]d : Scamell 
Tho : Bunter 
Roht Mercer 
Ed : Parham 
Jo : Weeks, sen"" 
Mr. Ince, Reef 
Mr. Leg 






8 








4 








4 








2 








2 








4 








7 








10 






Sm— j'* 4«. 



WINSl^ORD. 



EUis Rose 
Vid Bower 
Anne Bower 
Nicholas Keate 
John ffViker 
Willm Coleman 
Willm Meedle 
John Saunders 
Alexand' Barrett 
Thomas Burt 

Sma— j'' 

Suma totall hund^ 

Libtes p'd 



s. d. 
3 



4«. 



et| 



MEERE HUNDRED. 

Meere tithing. 



s. 
2 


2 





Mr. Bisho]) 


1 


8 





Willm Hewett 


5 


7 





Xi)ofer Phillips 





2 





Willm Rogers 





3 





Robt Bannester 





2 





Henry Boorne 





4 





Willm Barnard 





4 





Henry Clarke 





2 





Thomas l)all 





2 





Marian I'wogood 





2 





Mary Toogood 





'> 





Willm Toogood 





5 





Thomas Cowlie 


4 


4 


: 


lialph Ruddocke 


1 


\) 





.lolm Cli'iiu'iit 


'2 


2 





Uol.l Alfonl 



xix" iiij^ 



s. d. 

1 3 
5 
5 

2 4 
10 
4 



1 10 
2 
10 «) 
(\ 



() 



362 The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland 



MEKE HUNDKED— co?li^m^^e^, 

7 


s. d. 
1 3 




Wolstone Ellin 


s. 



a. 
2 


Shepherds grounds 





Kichard ffisher 





4 


Willm Garland 


2 





John fforward 





2 


John Lack 


8 





John fforward 





5 


Rebecca fffoster 


10 





John Bealing 





4 


Henry ffoster 


10 





Eichard Clement 





4 


Willm ffoster 


5 





Robt Brimson 





7 


Wolston ffoster 


8 





Do. fforward & Weltley 





9 


John Orahm 


1 9 





Tho: Dogrell 





5 


Tho : Alford, Junr. 


1 3 





Willm Goffe 





2 


John Coward 


3 





Mr. Willm Doddington 


6 


10 


Thomas King 


3 





Mr. Greene 





9 


John Welch 


2 





Thomas Hewett 





5 


John_Watts 


2 





George Briant 


1 


11 


Willm Clement 


5 





Robt Chislett 





3 


Robt Goldsborough 


5 





Willm Lewen 





3 


Willm Harding 


2 





Dorothy fforward 


1 


8 


Emanuell Stevens 


2 





Richard Barnard 





6 


Ro^ Pittman 


11 





Willm Barnard 





4 


Wolston Ellin Jun^ 


2 





Nicholas Kendall 





6 


Thomas Barnes 


2 





John Maton 





5 


Thomas Lucas 


5 





John Bradden 





4 


for M*"^^ Crompe 


5 





Jespar King 





2 


John Hewett 


4 





Andrew Hooper 





2 


f or^ Kings Armes 


5 




Thomas ffrie 





3 


Willm Hooper 


3 




Hawcridge tenem*- 





6 


Henry Collender 


3 


a 


The Parsonage 


10 


4 


Austin Pride 


2 




Deanes Orchard 





3 


Henry Gibbons 


2 


z 


Black house tenem* 





8 


Vid Coward 


4 


'S 


Willm Barnes 


2 


6 


Au : Pride for M 




s 


Thomas Bower 





5 


Newman 


1 6 




Jespar Bannester 


9 





ffra : Craddocke 


3 




John Bradden 





6 


Willm Crompe 


3 





Tho : Alford de Hinks 


1 


8 


Xpofer Knight 


3 





John Ball 





V 








Robt Bannesf^ sen**. 





6 

SEA 


Sum 4". 
LES. 


13s. 






s. 


d. 




s. d. 




Mr. Penruddocke 


11 





Thomas Smith 


4 





The parsonage 


2 


6 


Richard Brickell 


5 





Samson Hepdich 


1 


4 


Vid Crompe 


1 11 





Willm Bun 





5 


Vid Oliver 


4 





John Ball 





4 


James Gamlin 


3 





Wolston Ellin 





5 


John Wansee 


5 





Willm Callpen 





3 


Tho: Dogrell 


5 





Cornelius Shepherd 





3 


Willm Hindie 


3 






Baised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 



363 



SEALES — continned. 



Ro: Ban ester senr 
James Sadler 
James Hall 
Richard Pawmer 
Tho: Doggrell 
Richard ]Jogre]l 
Willm Still 
Tho: Greene 
Tho: Crumpe 
Vld Willins 
Willm Skreene 
Vid. Guyar 
Willm Baker 
Hugh Ellen 



s. d. 

10 

5 

10 



3 
3 



Ni: Pawmer 
John Jupe 
Wm. Jupe k lira: 
John Oram 
Robt Guyar 
Jo: Dorington 
Vid Pcrinan 
M''** Moore 
Part^of y^ viccarage 
Willm Candie 
Willm Lucas 
Tho: fforward 
Ma: Alford 

Sum 1''. 13^ 



s. d. 

9 

3 

4 

5 

'2 






10 









KNOILE. 










s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 




Mr. Willoughbie 


16 


8 





Mr. Hutchins 


1 








Willm Gibbons 


3 


4 





John Dowding 





2 





lienry I^erman 


1 


] 





Henry Moone 





4 





Thomas New 





9 





John Strong 





4 





John Perrie 





6 





John New 





3 





John tfricker 





6 





Mris Hartgill 


1 








Henrie White 





6 





Henry White senr 





2 





James Hunton 





8 





Vid Pope 





3 





Edward King 





10 





Ni: Bannester 





2 





Thomas Pope 





6 





Vid: Preston 





6 





Willm Gibbons 


1 


1 





The Viccaragde 





9 





Ivichard King 





6 













Mr. Uirdo 


1 








Sum j'' 13^ 













CHARNIGE. 










s. 


(/. 






^. 


d. 


Mr. Coufutrie 


8 


3 ob. 


Mr. Chatiii 







i> () 


Mr. Awberic 


4 


1 ob. 


.Mr. Goucntry tor 


I tciu 


•lU'l) 


2 ul 


Aml)ros Scott 





8 ob. 


W'ilhu Awborrie 







.) 1 


Vid Lander 





H ob. 


Widdow Hasrall 







'1 ol 


.Mr. IMiillips 





7 ..!.. 


lu'liflt l\ill'4" 




( 1 


1 II 


.Mr. r.a.Nlir 





r, () 


Sum If)" 


5'. 







364 The Mo7ithly Assessments for the EelieJ of Ireland 





STURTON. 








s. d. 




s. 


d. 


Mr. Barnes 


13 9 


ffrancis Jupe 





5 


Mr. ffeild 


3 5 


Willm Euill 





4 


Mr. Barnes 


12 


John Euill 





4 


Willm Bernard 


10 


raBradden 





2 


Thos: Banes ter 


11 


Mathew Combe 





2 


Yid Adlam 


11 


John Jupe 





2 


Walter Barnes 


11 


Robt Jupe 





2 


Nicholas Diar 


5 


Robt Davis 





2 


Eichard Bailie 


5 


Willm Riall 





1 


Kobt Gapper 


8 
KINGSTON 


Willm Greene 
DEU'ELL. 





1 




s. d. 




s. 


d. 


Mr. Eborne 


3 


Edward Buckler 





4 


Mr. Ludlow 


4 8 


Long meade 





2 


W" Gibbons, Jun. 


2 4 


Cutbert Gilbert 





1 ob. 


Michaell Batt 


2 4 


Tho: Humphry 





1 ob. 


Cutbert Hurle 


16 


John Norrice 





1 


Murrowes tenem* 


9 


Willm Butcher 





1 


Charles Blake 


8 








Willm Gibbons, senr 


5 

MAIDEN- 

s. d. 
7 6 


Sum 16\ 7^ 
BRADLIE. 






Mr. Seymor 


John Wansie 


s. 



d. 
8 


Mr. Whatman 


3 9 


Xpofer Hill 





6 


Mr. Willm Reddish 


2 3 


Jo: Toogood Junr 


1 


7 


Edward Shoard 


8 4 


Vid Leu'sage 





2 


The parsonage 


5 6 


Richard Draper 





4 ob. 


South Court ffarme 


5 6 


John Draper 





3 


Andrew Meadon 


10 


Willm Shoard 





3 


Alex: Reddish 


1 5 


Willm Baylie 





5 


John Chillton 


8 


An: Leu'sage 





5 


Osmond Shoard 


5 


Edmond Am'lie 





2 ob. 


Y^ tenem' of Walt' Barnes 5 


Henry Parsons 





3 ob. 


Richard Perrie 


17 


Ni: Shore 





3 


Ni: Moulton Jun' 


4 ob. 


Margery Curtis 





2 ob. 


Willm Walter 


11 ob. 


Cutbert Gilbert 





5 


Michaell Batt 


7 ob. 


Edward Murries grounc 


[ 


2 ob. 


Vid Shore 


8 


John Andros 





6 


John Baylie, senr. 


10 


An: Baylies late tenem' 





2 ob. 


Robt Gibbons 


110 


John Neaue 





2 


John Stratton 


7 


Thomas Shore 





2 ob. 


Thomas Dew 


6 


Robt. Curtis 





5 


Ni: Moulton, senr 


7 


John Toogood 





1 ob. 


Eliz: Shore vid 


7 ob. 








Vid Turner 


5 


Sum 2'^ 14^ 2^ 






Willm Penne 


3 


Sum totair ) •••„ .-. 
hund'p'd |^"J -^^"J 






Ed: Rickards 


3 







Raised in the IJividon of Wfrrw/i/nMer, 1648. 



:^>65 



WAKMISTEK HUNDIIED. 







Wf 


xrinist 


^' t\i\n\v^. 










s. 


(1 






s. 


d 




S, James Thin 





(j 





George fjong 





4 





John Sloi)er 


5 


8 





j John Barrett 





4 





Ed. Middlecott 


5 


8 





Vid Port 





7 





Willm Sloper 


2 


10 





John Hodges 





4 





Vid Ludlow 


2 


10 





Vid Larance 





2 





The parsonage 


5 


8 





Willm Pillton 





1 





John Turner 


1 


2 





' Mr. Clifford 





9 





Oliver Turner 





4 





Ni: J)avis 





1 





George Knight 





3 





Willm Wild 





2 





Robt Gardner 





G 





Willm Pilton 





2 





Ezeciell Dedinan 





2 





May ffiower 





2 





Vid Hillman 





2 





Willm Allen 





2 





Vid Norrice 





2 





Xpofer Turner 





2 





Willm Winkworth 





2 





Vid Rawlins 





3 





Richard Young 





4 





Willm Presse 


1 


2 





Drew Dedman 





2 





Robt Gardner 





6 





John Wansie 





10 





Willm Wilton 


1 


6 





Edward Walter 





3 





John Taylor 





3 





Richard Reason 





2 





Mr Willoughbie 





6 





ffra: Townsend 





2 





Jo. Adlam senr 





G 





Edward Deanes 





G 





Xpofer Willouby 





2 





Thomas Braxton 


1 








William Adlam 





2 





Stephen Long 





3 





John Hawkins 





3 





Willm Morgan 





2 





Tho: Alldridge 





7 





Robt Shergold 





2 





Piar: Pennie 





4 





Willm Healie 





2 





Richard Tidcombe 





2 





Vid Shergold 


1 


6 





John iJauis 





2 





John lUitchcr 





4 





Giles Daniel I 





5 





Thomas Ikitcher 





2 





John Wansie 





2 





Nicholas Butcher 


2 


2 





Edward Adlam 





3 


1) 


Edward IJaniell 





3 





Vid Presse 





') 





Thomas Toomer 





2 


— ' 


Richard P)aylie 





1 





Thomas Carter 





7 


— 


hMward Carj^Miter 


1 


C 





Larance Hunt 





(; 


— ' 


Willm Hawker 





1 





Vid. Whithead 





2 


[ 


Stei)hen Sims 





2 




Richard iMoodie 





3 


— ; 


Willm Deacon 





G 


__ 


John Wadman 





4 


~' 1 


George Smart 





2 




Jo: Clare, son'" 





10 


1 


W'" Davis sen 





\ 




Tho: (Gardner 





?> 


(j 


Tlio: Daiiiill 


1) 


') 




tlVa: SJHM-old 





2 





Xi: r.utclicr 


u 


2 


_ 


l-:d: liollMay 





I 





Mr \\ill(uil..r 





o 


_ 


Tho: riitticari(! 





1 





.lollM Sla.lr 


() 


., 


t) 


\'id Shulc 


1 


r, 





.Id: ( Mai'i' .1 uiir 


(1 


1 





WiJlin j'JKM.Mi 





1 


^^ 1 










Willm Lidlonl 





') 


.) ' 


Sum :i''. \'o\ 









M argil 



366 



The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland. 



SMALLBEOOKK 





s. 


d. 






- s. 


d. 




flfrancis Bennett 


3 








John Perrie 





6 





Mr. Middlecott 





5 





Willm Warren 





6 





Richard Langlie 





11 





Jone Scutt 





2 





Ri; Goodrouse 





5 





Ri: Woolford 





3 





Willm Blake 





6 





An: Gibbes 


1 


2 





Mr Temple 





11 





Robt Shergold 





6 





Mr. Moore 


1 


1 





Tho: Lewes 





2 





Mr. Meaden 


1 


2 





Mr. Willowbie 





4 





Willm Buckle 





5 





Giles Daniell 





2 





Ed: Daniell 





7 





Thomas Moore 





2 





Vid Andros 





4 













Willm Swift 





7 





Sum 13^ 9^. 













TEFFONT. 








s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


Mr Gifford 


1 


6 ob. 


Richard Burrow 





2 ob. 


Ni: Daniell 


2 


2 


Henry Whitemarsh 





4 


Ni: Merrifeild 


2 


7 


WiUm Cotterell 





4 ob. 


John Moore 





4 ob. 


Xpofer Martin 





4 ob. 


Thomas Baberstoke 





2 


Vid Luff man 





4 ob. 


Robert Coles 


1 


2 


Willm Barnes 


1 


7 ob. 


Leonard New 





7 


John Barnes 





5 


VTd Elmes 





1 ob. 


Richard Martin 





6 


Vid Sparke 





10 


Mr. South 





1 


Vid Lush 





2 








Ma the w Lush 





4 ob. 


Sma 14«. 5^. ob. 








BORE 


HAM. 






Mr. Staples 


3 


d. 
8 


WUlm Baylie 


s. 



d. 
9 


Mr. Gifford 


1 


ob. 


Mr. Richardson 





6 


Mr. Young 


3 


ob. 


Tho: Moore & Watts 





3 


Mr. Willowbie 


2 


ob. 


Richard Hawkins 





1 ob. 


Ri: Langlie Junr 


2 


ob. 


Mris Middlecott 





1 ob. 


Ri: Langlie Senr. 


1 


6 ob. 


Willm Edwards 





1 


Willm Goodrous 


1 


3 


Robert Wickham 





1 


John Elliott 


1 


6 ob. 


James Wattes 





1 


Edward Baylie 


1 





Sum l8^ 9^ 







Raised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 367 

NOETOK 





s. 


d. 






.s. 


d. 




Mr. JBenett 


5 


10 


ol). 


Anthony Thresher 


1 


6 





Mr. Bariew 


1 


8 





Jo: Edwards, shepherd 





1 





Middleton tfarme 


4. 


6 





John Dew 





1 





Xpofer Turner 


2 


9 





Tho: Bower 





1 





Mr. Peirce 


1 


3 





Anthony Long 


1 


8 





John Langlie 





10 





Josuali Bath 


1 








Charles Wrench 


1 


1 





John Webb 





5 





Kichard Sims 





8 


ob. 


John Rogers 





3 


ob. 


Joseph Dew 





6 


ob. 


Ralph Haise 





5 





John Edwards 





3 





Edward Salsburie 





1 





Walter Chambers 





6 





Humphrie Gager 





2 





John Knight 





4 





Emble Co])ice 





1 





Willm Edwards 





1 


ob. 


The parsonage 


3 


1 


ob 


WilTm Dew 





5 





John Curtis 


1 





ob 


Jo: Edwards Jun. 





2 





vid ffranklin 





1 





Eliz: ffiower 





1 


ob. 


Sum 1". IP. 8" 








Tho: Edwards 





5 




















DINTON. 








s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 


Lo: of Penbrooke 


1 


1 





Ralph Daniell 


1 


4 ob 


Sergant Hide 


1 


11 





George Swetman 





6 ob. 


Mr. South 


2 


9 





Ni: Daniell 





6 ob 


Mr. Gifford 


3 


10 





Willm Barnes 





3 


John King 


2 


7 





Willm Cottrell 





1 ob. 


Tho. tfrowd 





8 





John Haiter 





ob 


John Shepherd 





7 





John Lide 





ob 


Mr. Pinkney 


1 


4 





Mr. Dawkins k Simon 






Vid Harres 





7 





Cotrell 


u 


1 


1 Mr. Low 


1 


1 





Willm Tabor 





1 ob 


(leorgc Clmpjiell 





11 





Stephen Webb 





1 ob 


Willm Dawkins 





7 





Mr. Bushell 





1 ob 


Mr. Penruddocke 


1 


1 





Thomas Li Hie 





1 ob 


Thomas Coles 





G 


ob. 


Rogr. Harris it Simon 






! Ri:Basley 


1 


1 





New 





1 


i Roger Tabor 





8 





John Porter 


1 


1 (1 


\ John Jesse 


1 


1 





Hugh Shoph'd A- All.n 






Pirhard Docrc 





\\ 





lla.ulall 





1 


llt'iiry Webb 





5 











1 Arthur Harris 


I) 


(1 


ob. 


I Sum 1". 8*. 4 '. 







vnr,. xxxvii. — no. cxvii. 



368 The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland 





SUTTON. 






s. d. 




s. d. 


Mr. Burges 


8 


Vid Presse 


2 


Mr. ffranklin 


4 


Willm Weeks 


8 


Mr. Eldaon 


4 


Jo: Gilbert 


6 


Mr. Bayiie 


4 


Robt Hinton 


10 


Stephen Long 


10 


Robt Weeks 


10 


Jefferie Exton 


1 


Vid Marsh 


10 


James Harris 


10 


Jo: ffranklin 


9- 


Thomas Long 


10 


Stephen Long, Jun'. 


9- 


Jacob Butt 


5 


Vid Bishop 


4 — 


John Curtis 


6 


John Knight 


3 — 


Vid Browne 


2 ob. 


Mr ffranklin for y** mill 


8 


Stephen Long, sen' 


1 4 


Vid Hinton 


4 


John Hinton 


6 


John Hinton Clarke 


3 


John Emm 


10 


Willm Moore 


3 


Robert Lucas 


10 


Nicholas Baker 


3 


ffarmo-" Hinton 


16 


Step: Hinton pro Tann' 


sO 3 


Vid Dew 


9 


Richard Burden 


2 


Richard Hiscott 


10 


Vid Baker 


1 ob 


Ri: ffranklin 


4 


Willm Hinton 


ob. 


Jo: Hinton Jun' 


4 


John Harris 


ob. 


Willm Grist 


2 


Sum 2". P. 4^ 






COE^ 


^LEY. 






8. d. 




s. d. 


Sr. James Thin 


1 7 ob. 


Robt Hooper 


2 ob. 


Mr. ffitzhugh 


6 ob. 


Willm Hooper 


4 


Joane Turner 


3 ob. 


Edward Hobbs 


6 ob. 


The parke 


3 3 


Robert Hopkins 


8 


Huntell hull farme 


15 


Jo: Culu'^house 


5 


Ma: Chandlor 


1 3 ob. 


Stephen Blake 


3 


Will Chandlor 


1 10 


John Meere 


3 


An: Raxworthy 


1 10 ob. 


John Knight 


3 


John Hopkins 


1 1 


Thomas Hill 


3 


Willm HoUoway 


6 ob. 


Avis Gay 


3 


Robt Hopkins 


6 ob. 


Peter Quill 


1 ob. 


John Webb 


2 2 


Daniell Hellier 


1 ob. 


John Car 


1 1 


Lewes Abraham 


1 ob. 


Michell Eustis 


6—1 


Robt Carpenter 


1 ob. 


Tho: Clare 


6 — 


Tho Steuens 


1 ob. 


Ri: Carpenter 


5 — 


W™ Singer & Culu'house 1 ob. 


Tobie Watts 


3 ob. 


for Jerratts 


3 


Nicholas Morgan 


6 ob. 


George Swift 


1 ob. 


Vid. HoUoway 


1 4 ob. 


John Morgan 


1 


Amie Crey 


3 


John Kennell 


1 ob. 


George Turner 


1 1 


Occupiers of Leills 


ob. 


Morris Littlecott 


6 ob. 


Sum 1" 13^ 1^. 






^ Margi 


n gone. 





Raised in the Division of Wfi/nninster^ 1648. 



369 







VPTON. 










s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 




Thomas Seaman 


5 


5 


Vid Cabbell 





6 


ob. 


Eund Thomas 


1 


1 


Michael Humphries 





6 


ob. 


Parson Seaman 


5 


5 


George Turner 





6 


ob. 


The ffarme 


5 


5 


John Morgan 





6 


ob. 


Wilhn Wright 


2 


8 ol). 


ffra: Whatlie 





6 


ob. 


Widdow Hill 


2 


2 


John Turner 





3 





Widdow Keinton 


1 


7 ob. 


Oswald Stevens 





1 


ob. 


Xpoier Greene 


1 





Will: Turner 





1 


ob. 


Robt Holloway 


1 


1 


Jo: Carpenter 





1 


ol). 


John Daniell 





6 ol). 


Tho: Willson 





1 


ob. 


Mary Hill 





6 ob. 


Sum I". 11^ 








Xpofer Daniell 





6 ob. 












FFISHERTON 


^ & BAPTON. 










s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 




Mr. Toi)p 


7 


6 


Vid Hoskins 





4 





Mr. Nicholson 


1 


6 


Edward Ingram 





6 





y*" parsonage 


6 





Vid Snelgrove 


1 


6 





Ni: Stevens 


1 


1 ob. 


Robert Greene 





6 





Hugh Henwood 





1 ob. 


John Ingram 


1 








Wilim Eyles 





9 


Vid Rebbecke 





6 





John Fashion 





3 


Henry Person 





6 





Hugh Henwood 





4 ob. 


Willm Eyles 





6 





Thomas fibster 





10 ob. 


James Rebbecke 





6 





Vid Kebbeck 





6 


Henry Ingram 





8 


ob. 


John Dowtie 


1 





Willm Smith 





3 





John Ingram 


1 


8 


Robert Haiter 


1 








Willm Fashion 





9 


Robert Wansburie 


1 








Vid Briant 





6 ob. 


Vid Wansburie 





6 





Jo: Fashion & W>" 


Wats 1 





Willm Wansburie 





6 





Willm. Dowtie 





1 () 


Guy Potticarie 





3 





John Davis 


2 


6 

BISHOP 


Sum 1". 1G\ 
STROW, 


7^'. ol). 


d. 
3 




.Mr. Temple 


•S. 

6 


d. 
7 


Willm Edwards 








Mr. Face 


2 


9 


Willm Grant 





.) 


() 


Mr. Gitibrd 


2 





John Chivers 





1 


ob. 


Mr. Shergold 


2 





Jo: Marsh cl- Ilu-li 








Ema: iUylie 


1 


10 


Mat hew 





2 





.John Stokes 





10 


An: Long.V Step: P.l; 


kr 


i! 





Mr. Willowl.ie 


1) 


ti 


M-. Moore 





1 


II 


Wid Wickham 





:i 


Sum 17-. 10'. 








Wia l.an-lie 





1 ol.. 











370 



The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland 





s. 


d. 


NORI 


ilDGE. 


s. 


d. 


The ffarme 


5 


2 





The parsonage 


1 


3 ob 


Tho: Daniell 





7 


Ob. 


Xpofer Daniell 


1 


3 ob 


Mr. Willowbie 


1 


3 


ob. 


John Turner 





7 ob 






PERTWOOD, 








Mr. Marvin & \ 
Mr. Moorhouse J 


s. 

6 














Sum totallsl ••... ... ..^ 










bur 


p'-d^ 


|XV1J-. V1J% IJ". 








HAITSBUKIE HUND. 










Cod ford tithing. 








s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 


Mr. Topp 


8 


4 





Philip Steuens 





3 


Mr. Swaine for y" 








Willm Carde 





4 ob 


parsonage 


2 








John Snellgar 


1 


2 


Mr. Creed 


5 








Tho: Crooch Junr 





5 


Mr. Polden 


1 


10 


ob. 


Alex: ffarlie 





2 ob 


John Bright 


1 


3 





Vid Tuckey 





2 


John Hibbert 


1 





ob. 


Jo: Ingram Junr 





2 


Wilhn Ratford 





2 





John Crooch 





2 


Thomasin Dugdaile 





2 





Giles Tukey 


1 


8 


Tho: Gregorie 





2 





John Withers 


1 


8 


John Sidnham 





5 





John Carde 





1 ob. 


Phillip Ingram 


1 





ob. 


John Woort 





6 


Vid Combes 


1 





ob. 


George Withers 





10 


John Smith 





2 





Tho: Wort 





11 


Vid Davis 





2 





John Ingram 


1 


6 


Edmond Crooch 





7 


ob. 


Walter Slie 





2 


Tho: Crooch 





5 





Tho: Wansburie 





2 


John Moodie 





5 





Xpofer Stevens. 





2 


John Prior 





1 





Sum 35^ 










CHITT 


ERNE. 








s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 


Lo: Pawlett 


8 


8 





Edward Baker 





9 ob. 


Mr. Jordan 


3 


9 


ob. 


Sam k Mabell Guy 


2 


2 


Mr. Bower 


5 


5 





George Imber 


1 


1 


Mr. Wasfeild 


4 


4 





Mr. Swetnam 





6 ob. 


Mr.Michell 


3 


3 





Will Compton 


1 


1 


Xpofer Slade 





9 





Tristram Compton 





6 ob. 


Annis Slade 


2 


8 


ob. 


Battle Axford 





6 ob. 


Mr. Westlie 


1 


7 


ob. 


Humphry Turner 





6 ob 



Raised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 



371 





CHITTERNE continued. 










.y. 


d. 






.S-. 


d. 




John Guy 


1 


4 





Jordan Sanders 





3 





John Hnntlie 





3 





Jordan Curtis 





3 





Jordan Huntlie 





3 





Dawlie 





3 





Mr. Cobb 


4 


4 





John Huntlie 





3 





John Haiter 


3 


3 





Tho: Hoi)kins 





3 





WiUmPrior 


1 


1 





Edmond Moodie 





G 


ol). 


Jordan Howes 





9 


— ' 


VVillni Sanders 





G 


ob 


Vid^lilles 





9 


— 


Mr. Ditton 


1 


1 





Xpofer Slade 


1 


7 


ob. 


Mr. Swyre 


1 


7 


ob 


George Iniber 





3 





Vid Hait^ & An: Besant 





6 





John Attwood 





6 


ob. 


Sum 2''. 18^ 










BOYTON & COIITON. 










s. 


d. 






a. 


d. 




Mr. Lambert for y* 








Morrice Tillie 


7 


1 





whole G moneths 
rate wth y'^ rest as 
folio weth 


28 


4 





Willm Smith 
Xpofer Moodie 


1 
2 


5 
9 







Parson Marvin 


28 


4 





Nicholas Watts 


1 


5 





Willni Cottrell 


2 


10 





Henrie Busse 


1 


5 





Ralph Dyar 


1 


5 





Ri: Moodie 


7 


1 





Mr. Potticarie 


2 


10 





Josias Robbins 


2 


10 





W'". Rax worthy 


8 


6 





George Dyar 


5 


8 





Jefterie Euerett 


2 


10 





Ralph Diar Senr 


2 


10 





Charles Hiiiton 


8 








John Churchell 


2 


10 





Yid Moodie 


2 


10 





Richard Dyar 


2 


10 





Paul Dredge 


1 


5 





Richard Papps 


2 


10 





jSFr. Mompesson 


39 


8 




Tho: Moodie 


2 


10 





Mr. How 


11 


4 




John Hinton 


2 


10 





Mr. Croocli 


,'') 


8 





Mr. Ash 


1 


5 





Henry Lacocke 


11 


4 





Humphry Withers 





8 





llali)h Diar 8enr 


2 


10 





Sum pro sex mens 


iI)S 


lOii 


. 6- 


ivichard Hinton 


5 


8 




IMl 

For G 1 


BEK. 

nonths. 










s. 


d. 






,s\ 


-/. 




Mr. Ay Hire 


17 


(; 





(iili's Daiiicll, vTd) 








Tho: fllower 


34 





ob. 


Courtly l{o:M()n- 


'J 


t ; 





^Villlll Harris 


24 


8 





dy, ThoiConiptou i 


o 


t ) 


-iohn Stayiier 


1 


r, 





and John King 








Xpofer llititoii 


1 


.- 





W'illin '{'inker 


\ 


o 





Williii Mcnif.il.l 


i) 


1 





.lohii Miiitic 


I 


."' 


() 


Hi: i5id<llcc(.iube 


6 


H 





\'id Coulston tt John 


1 


.'■ 


I) 


Hugli King 


1 


5 





Sum 6". 6'. 8*». 














' Marg 


in goni'. 









372 The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland. 



HAITSBUEIE. 



Mr. Ash 
Mr. Moore 
Mris. Moore 
Mr. Potticarie 
Mr. Hideout 
Mr. Dyar 
Willm Bennett 
John Curtis 
Mr. Temple 
John Snellgar 
Robt Okeford 
George Randall 
Richard Marks 
Richard Hewlett 
Hugh Hewlett 
Tho: Bennett 
Oliver Wornall 
Ri: Crooch 
Robt. Smith 
Roger Snellgar 
Drew Slie 
Vid Sudden 
Willm Deanes 
Tho: Moodie 
Vid Hill 
Tho: White 



s. d. 

9 2 

9 

7 

3 

1 

2 

1 

5 

10 

1 4 

2 
9 








6 
2 
2 



10 

8 

6 

2 



3 

4 
6 



Ri: Snelgar 
Ri: Button 
Henry Marsh 
John Orchard 
Henry Moore 
Will Snelgar 
Lewes Hewlett 
Xpoler Adlam 
Will: Deacon 
Xpofer Curtis 
Robt Westlie 
Austine Dougdaill 
Edmond Perrie 
Ri: Biddlecombe 
Willm Hewlett 
Willm Wornall 
Willm Leu'ce 
John Okeford 
Henry Lannam 
Henry Lacocke & Mark 

Rog's 
Mr. Ball & Jo: Walter 
Jo: Curtis Sen' 
Robert Markes 
Tho: Poole_ 

Sum 2". 3^ 8'\ 



HORNINGSHAM. 



s. d. 

Mr. Arundell 7 

S^ James Thin 2 

The parsonage 10 

Jo-^liver 10 

Willm Langlie 10 

Mr. Sangar 9 

Mr. Simson 3 

Johnfforrest 1 

Willm Carpenter 4 

Willm Stile 3 

Vid Humphry 8 

Roger flfoster 3 

W"\Marsh & Ed:ffranklinO 2 

Edwardffar 2 

Ed: Adla k Osmond HuntO 2 

Richard Nurth 1 ob. 

Vid Northye 2 



s. 
John Cholsey 

Vid Cholsey _ 

Vid Exton et vid Baylie 
Jo: ffar & An: Whatlie 
Tho:Whatlie&Jo: SuddenO 
Ro: Adlam & Ro: Greene 
Tho: Stile o 

Willm Roe 

John Draper 

Ro: George & Jo: Barett 
Jo: Goodfellow & Ro: 

Shepherd 

R^bt Hill 

Vid ffar & Jo: Brodhurst 
Jo: Pennie & Ro: King 

Sum IV 0. 



d. 
2 



3 

2 

3 
3 
3 
2 











2 

2 

1 

1 

1 












ob. 









Raised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 



373 







ORSTON. 










s. 


d. 




s. 






Mr. Tice 


1 


7 ob. 


Robt Ward 







ob. 


Tho: Harris 


1 


10 ob. 


Rol)t Wallen 







ob 


Willm Coles 


1 





George Woods 







ob 


Nicholas Ward 





3 


Millescnt Harris 










George Harris 





2 


Mr. Noyce 


6 




ob. 


John Ward 





3 


Mr. Thornberrye 


1 







Edmond Nash 





3 


Robt Wallen 










Robt Woodes 





3 










Robt Moore 





2 


Sum— 14" 


8'>. 










KNOOKE. 










s. 


d. 




s. 


d 




Mr. fiframpton 


4 


8 


Henry Lanil^ert 





3 





Mr. Moore 


2 


1 


Ja: Lewes k W'" Hewlett 


3 





Mr. Reelie 





6 ob. 


Philip Monday 





3 


(» 


Richard Clase 





9 ob. 


Lewes Hewlett 





1 


ob. 


Willm Lewes 





4 ob. 


Drew Hewlett 





1 





Ri: Lambert & Mary 





6 ob. 


W'" Lewes Jun"^ 





1 


ob 


ffra: Hevill 





3 











BRIXTON DEUi^ELL. 





s. d. 






s. 


d. 




The parsonage 
The tfarme 


4 10 
9 9 







John Hobbes 
Tho: Pashion 


1 





2 






Henry Rice 
John Lodge 
Ralph Ruddocke 
Xpofer Kerlie 
Phillip Cooper 


2 3 

1 8 
1 8 
1 
1 









John Street 
Ri: Humphry 
John Pashion 

Sum-1" 4 




1 


\ 2''. 


2 


2 








HULL-DEU'^^J. 





•S. 


(/. 








5. 


</. 


Mr. Rideoute 


15 


4 





Charles Wreiuli 




1) 


(5 — 


Mr. Barnes 


1 


() 





John Lawrance 




I) 


r, 


Mr. Toogood 


1 


;") 





.John l\al)botts 







r. 


H(>nry Uice 


1 


1 





AK'x: r.rst 







1 


M«-iH Thill 





7 





.lolui r.roilliurst 







•1 I) 


Vid Matlu-w 





/ 





Willm (arixMitiT 







1 


Wilfm .Marsh 





/ 





•lo: (Jislinghani 







1 u 


Mr. Beach 





2 


—I 


Sum 1". 8*. 


2'». 










' 


.Margi 


1 gone. 









374 The Monthly Assess7nents for the Belief of Ireland. 
ASHTON GIFFOED. 





s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 




Mr; Swayne Rectr 


1 


9 





WiUm Crooch 





5 





John Turner 


1 


9 





Willm Eatford & y^ 








Xpofer Sinkins 





5 





widdowe 


1 


3 





James Hayward 


2 








Philip Hinton 





5 





WiUm Card 


1 


9 





Charles Combe 





1 


G 


Edmond Croocli 





6 





Sum lO^ 4d. 









TITHRINGTOK 





5. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


Mr. Crowch 


3 


6 


Walter Marsh 





6 


Roger Haise 





7 ob. 


Vid Chamb^in 





3 ob 


Willm Langlie Jun'. 





7 


Stephen Long 





7 


Ri: Button 





3 ob. 


Willm Langlie Sen'. 


1 


2 ob 


Thomas Ball 





7 


Willm Ball 





7 


Ste: Chamberlin 


1 


3 









UPTON LOVELL. 





s. d 






s. 


d 


Mr. Braddish 


3 1 


ob. 


Jo: Segram 





7 ob. 


Mr. Newman 


1 10 


ob. 


Edmond Imber 





7 ob. 


Mr. Curtis 


2 6 





Thomas Mog 





7 ob. 


WilTm Blake 


1 3 





Jo: Moodie 





7 ob. 


Mathew Best 


11 





John Jackman 





5 


Mr. Hickman 


9 





Henry Curtis 





6 ob. 


Melliar Stevens 


1 3 





Mr. Reelie 





3 ob. 


Ma,thew Combe 


1 3 





Robt Moore 





3 ob. 


Vid Andros 


6 





Sm 16' 6\ 







BAKLEY (BAYCLIFEE). 





s. d. 




s. d. 


Mr. Ludlow 


2 2 


Peter King 


3 


Ri: Leu'sage 


1 1 


Ni: Molton 


4 ob. 


Jo: Reddish 


3 ob. 







Raised in the Division of Warminster, 1648. 



S'. Giles Mompson 
Tho: Kent 
Richard Hix 
Jo: Sell wood 
Jo: Doughton 
Betford fjarsonage 



BATTINGTON {Batharapton.) 
d. 



10 



Mr. Perkins 

Mr. Mompson 

Henry Miles i 

Little battington jjar- 



375 



d. 



6 





sonage 



9 



WHITLY. 



tSum 1", 4' 



Mr. 
Mr. 



Westlie 
Bennett 

Sum totall 1 , ^u „ 
liund'p'd/^' -7 



2\ 



HOPJIELLSDOWNE HUND^^- 

Steeple Ashton Titliing. 
d. 



Mr. Bennett 

George Marks 

Henry Martin 

John Marks 

John Sillu'thorne 

Grace Grooke 

Rol)t Axford 

Xpofer Gatlie 

Philip Dole 

John Long 

George Marks 

Jo: Merriweth""- 

Jo: Stileman 

Mrs. Stileman 

Wilim Marks Jun«-, 

Mr. Verbury 

The parsonage 

Richard Singar 

The Lady Beachan]])e 

Henry Carpenf- 

Henry Marieram 

Willm Stileman 

Jo: Wilkins 

Thomas I). mis 

Margrclt Wli.itlie 

Ed_u-ar(l .MarLin 

Robt. Jert'eries 
Anthonic GriflVn 

Henry iiong 

Henry .Martin, An: Mar 
tin i^' I'M: Martin foi 
part of Wells lane j 
VOL. X.XXVII.— NO. I XV 11 



10 

1 4 



1 




1 

3 





1 7 
1 
10 





















































o 








Jo: Stileman for the other 



d. 



Oil 



part 
John Player 
Moore Jennings 
Roger Grooke 
Walter Tucker 
Mary Hancock e 
Henry Shephard 
Mr. Bremrige 
Mris Whitaker 
Jo: Whitaker 
Jo:^ancocke 
Wilhn Whittaker 
John Grouch 
Walter Marks 
John ffriar 
Mr. Long 
Robt Hancocke 
James Hancocke 
Anthonie Marks 
Kdward Martin 
Vid Glia])nian 
Willm (IViar 
•"^teijhcn Pawmer 
M"-'^ Pawlett 
Henry Stileman 



lin in, 

ny W 



11 
3 
1 
4 
3 









6 



6 



4 
2 

?> 

5 
9 

10 

2 
i> 

3 

<; 

'1 

L' 

•1 



Sum 2". 4' 



376 The Monthly Assessments for the Relief of Ireland 
SOUTHWEEKE. 





s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


Robt Beach 





8 


Willm Dowling 





5 ob. 


Willm Rawlins 


6 





Tho: Brodribbe 





4 


Jo: Dunning 





5 ob. 


Willm Keeping 





8 


Mar: Rundell 





2 ob. 


John Gaisford 


1 


6 0- 


Simon Crabb 





2 ob. 


Jo: Gaisford for Dunningsl 


4 


Hugh Crabb 





3 


Anthony Buissie 





6 


Willm Crab 





4 


John Willis 





4 


Margrett Crab 





8 


An: Grinhill 





4 ob. 


Simon & An: Crab 





3 


Jo: Dunning 


1 


11 


Peter Selcocke 





3 


Samuell Norris 





8 


Henry Parsons 





4 


Ambros Chappell 





4 ob. 


Phillip 7sher 





5 


Am: Chapell for M"9 






Henry Abrham 





2 


Trenchard 


1 


4 


Willm Browne 





9 


Simon Crab 





7 


Edward Paps 





3 


Jo: Carpenter 


1 


1 


John Crab 





5 


Tho: Gregorie 





4 


Richard Powe 





6 


Willm Ruttie 


1 





Edmond Baylie 





6 


Edward Pro vis 





3 


RobtJRundell 





4 ob. 


Joseph Combe 





1 ob. 


Willm Norris 





4 ob. 


Richard Ball 





2 


Judeth Scott 





7 


Willm Harris 





2 


Henry Norris 





9 


Ri: Piatt & Ri: Whit- 






Simon Phillis 





5 


church 





2 


Willm Rainold 





5 


Sum j». 9^ 3«i. 











SEMINGTOK 








s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


John Tyford 


3 


6 


Robt Long 





1 ob. 


Ni: Jordan 




2 


Walter Long 





1 ob. 


Jo: Tyford 




2 


Tho: Tucker 





7 


Georg Drinkwater 




2 


Ro: Drinkwater 





3 ob. 


The parsonage 




2 


Mr. Nicholas 


2 


9 


Ni: Pashion 





1 ob. 


VidHix 





4 ob. 


Vid Poole 





7 ob. 


Xpofer Meriweth*" & Jo: 






Vid Burges 





7 


Slade 





2 


Vid Wacombe 





3 ob. 


Jo: Smith 





2 


George Stoke 





1 ob. 


Willm Mansell 





2 


Ralph Barnard 





2 ob. 


Mr. Chivers 





2 


Joseph Tailor 





7 


Ni: flower & Tho: Sumn" 





2 


Mr. Long 





1 ob. 


Sum l5^ 11^ 







Raised in the Division of Warminster^ 1648. 



377 







TINHED. 










s. d. 






s. 


d 




The Lady Beachami' 


e 12 8 


— ' 


Xpofer Gill 





5 





Mr. Noble 


6 1 


— 


Oswald Saw 





f) 





Vid_Whittaker 


4 4 


— 


1 Jone Saw 





5 





Xpofer Gardner 


2 7 


— 


Jo: Abraham 





5 





Jo: Blackborough 


2 7 


— 


Oswald fifoord 





9 





Gabriell Whithorne 


10 


— 


Will Phillips ck Tho: 








Robt. White 


1 


— 


Vincent 





5 





Ed: Dunnicke 


10 


— 


Widdow Robbins ct) 








Tho: liartlie 


10 


ob. 


Henrie Hawkins / 





5 





Cad: Price 


9 





1 








Robt. Gray 


9 





Snm-j'i 17^ 


5^1. 








COTJLSTON 


& TILSED. 










s. d 






s. 


d. 




The La: Beachampe 


1 f) 


ob. 


John Baggs 





8 


ob. 


Mr. Lambe 


6 7 





Jo: Gun ton k Tho: Salte 


rO 


11 




Mr. Yorke 


6 3 





Ed: Purchase 





6 




The Lady Vernham 


3 3 





Jo: Pinnocke 





5 




Mr. Norborne 


6 7 





Willm Stoute 





2 




Mr. Ricliards 


1 5 


ob. 


Mr. Sharpe 





2 




Jefferie Tipper 


1 5 


ob. 


Roger Crooke 


2 


1 


_ 


John Baker 


1 1 





Mr. Wallis 


2 


1 




Jo: Alexander 


8 


ob. 


Henry Tailor 





6 


__ 


Oswald Harford 


4 


ob. 


Vid Nash 





2 





Charles Harford 


4 


ob. 


John Long 


1 


5 


ob. 


Edward Toghill 


2 





Y'e Parsonage 





8 


ob. 


John Smith 


4 


ob. 
HIN^ 


Sunr2i'. 1'. 2'^ 

roN. 








Mr. Earnly 


s. d. 

1 7 


ob. 


James Lanfill 





d. 





Willm Blagden 


1 4 





Willm Shipman 





5 





John Tucker 


8 





Robt Tuker 





4 





VTd Whatlie 


9 





Abell fferris 


{) 


4 





Valent: Peirce 


6 





Walter .Mages 





3 




John Long 


G 





Henry Whitlocke 





\\ 




Willm Clifford 


3 





Ann Si)iar 





3 




John Tyford 


3 





\'id Whitmore 





W 




Y" parsonage 


7 





ImI: Swaine 





a 




Jerome Deane 


5 





-lo: A Id ridge 





:{ 




John Sims 


r, 





Daiiifll I^rior 





w 





Vid Russell 


r, 













ffra: Hawkins 


5 





Sum 12". 









Man 



:in gone. 



I L> 



378 The Monthly Assessments for the Belief of Ireland. 







EDmaxoN. 










^ 


d. 






s. 


d 




The Lady Beachampe 


23 


5 





Salomon Gunston 





5 





y" tenem* late Suttons 





10 





Tho. Saw & Jone Saw 





5 





ffor Pitmans peece 





6 





Vid Courtney 





5 





M"« Pawlett 




6 





Tho. Barnes 





4 





Jo. Carpenter 










W-" Paintr & Jo. Harris 





4 





John Prior 










Willm Toghill 





4 





Vid Aldridge 










Ri. Hevell, jun^ 





2 





Vid Smith 










Tho. Whittacre 





3 





John Yorke 





5 





George Hancocke 





3 





Henry Gunston 





5 





Vid Tarrie 





2 





Willm Aveane 





3 





Vid Wiatt 





2 





Ri. Aveane 





3 





Oswald Bartlie 





2 





Vid Stevens 





5 





Ro.Haruie&Ro.Hellford 


4 





Robt Noyce 





5 





Simon Dowe & Gorge 








Henry Marvin 





5 





Toghill 





4 





Ri. Hevell sen^ 





5 





Sum lii. 17s. 5d 









WEST ASHTON. 





s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 




Samuell Hill 


8 


3 





Robt. Shephard 





5 





Mf Bremrage 





9 





Jo. HuUbert 





5 





Anthonie Martin 


7 


5 





JohnWhatlie 





4 





An. Silu'thorne seni* 





9 





Willm Pawmer 


1 


6 





An. Silu'thorne junr 





2 





Samuell Hill 





6 





Andrew Long 





2 





Thomas Marchant 





9 





Robt Beach 


1 


8 





Marie Sillu'thorne 





9 





Henry fflower 


1 


2 





John ffriar 





2 





Mary Burges 


1 


9 





Richard Rich 





2 





Jone Sillu'thorne 





10 





Vid. Harlock 





3 





Jo: Sillu'thorne 





2 





Mr. Norburn & Tho. 








Mathew Burges 


1 


6 





Arnold 





2 





Thomas Potter 


2 


5 





Roger Marie 


1 








Willm Blagden 





2 





Willm Whittaker 





9 





Henrie Long 





10 





Mary Gilbert 





9 





John ffriar 


1 


3 





Henrie k Ed. Martin 


1 








Thomas Ward 





4 













Edmond Lewes 


10 





Sum— j^' 18^ 


2^. 







Raised in the Dividon of Warminster, 1648. 



579 









KEEVILL. 










s. 


d. 






s. 


d. 




Mr. Lambert 


4 


4 





Willm Nash 





3 





The Parsonage 


5 








Tho: Harris 





2 





John Tyf ord 


1 


4 





Ni: Jordan 





8 





Vid Harris 





5 





Mr. Carpenter 





8 





Tho. Harvest 


2 








Robt Evans 





3 





Vid Hiscocke 





7 


ob. 


John Hancocke 





8 





Wiihn Harris 


2 


5 





Vid VVhatly 





5 





Willm Beu'stone 





6 





James Hancocke 





5 





Robt D. Lyne 





5 


ob. 


Willm Deuerell 





7 





Richard Norris 





4 


ob. 


Willm Hancocke 





6 





Ri: Dahner 





7 


ob. 


Roger Jordan 


1 


3 





Tho: Meslen & Waif. 








VidNash 





7 





Little 





2 





Tho: Taylor 





7 





Henry Shepherd 





5 





Richard Nash 


2 








M''^ Jones 





7 





Sam: Sheppard 





6 





Henry Spier 





5 





James Gaisford 





6 





Tho: Sumner 





8 





Willm Mathewes 





2 





Hester Blagden 





5 





W"". Manfill & Jone LineO 


2 





Edward Baker 





3 





Edward Tucker 





4 





George Dyar 





5 





Jo: Hancocke of Hinton 


4 


ob 


Vid Phillips 





2 





Xpofer Sumner 





9 





Henry Margoram 





4 





Robt Jordan 





4 





Andrew Milson 





4 





. . } nely 





6 





Jo:Luden et vid Conduitt 


2 





. . . legden 


2 


2 





John Sunmer 





2 







1 


10 





Henry Jones 





7 










2 





Vid Line 





6 





. . . Baker 





2 





Robt. Rainer 





8 










3 





Alex: Ijuden 





1 


ob. 







10 





Jo: Alia way 





5 










2 





John Gilbert 


2 


3 














1 1, illy gone. At least 



' Here tlif sheet of the roll is toi'ii and < iiwl 
one other parish is missing. 
The whole of the amounts assessed in K<'.-vil ar.> inta<-t., but the List nine 
(I entries want the names or portions of them. 



380 



ARACHNIDA OF WILTSHIEE. 



ARANEIDEA AND PHALANGIDEA. 
By the Rev, O. Pick ard- Cambridge, MA., F.R.S., &c. 

The materials for the subjoined list have been accumulating for 
many past years. Besides some Arachnids I have myself collected, 
many were collected for me by my cousin, the late Col. Pickard, 
R.A., V.C., &c. (while tutor to his late Royal Highness Prince 
Leopold, at Boyton Manor and East Grafton). More recently 
I received considerable collections from the neighbourhood of 
Salisbury from Dr. H. P. Blackmore, M.D. ; and some also from the 
vicinity of Marlborough College, kindly collected for me througli 
the good offices of Mr. Edward Meyrick, F.R.S., Science Master at 
the college, chiefly, I believe, by the junior members of his own 
family. No doubt the list, (numbering one hundred and seventy- 
five species) though very respectable and important, is by no means 
an adequate one, considering the nature of the different localities 
mentioned. I should without hesitation expect that anything like 
the systematic search of a " specialist " would more than double it 
by the end of any single year's collecting. The vast range of 
uncultivated and down lands, and Savernake Forest, would alone, 
I think, make this certain. 

I have appended the initials of the collectors I have named to 
the species collected by them, and my own only to a few species of 
rarity ; but I have myself noted during many collecting rambles 
in Wiltshire, most of the common and widely-distributed species 
in the list, though I did not at the time keep any separate note 
upon them. Many of them I met with in a most promising 
locality, Alderbury, near Salisbury, and in the near neighbourhood 
of Salisbury itself. Old Sai-um, &c., &c., but chiefly in the vicinity 
of Norton Bayant, near Warminster, where on the highest Downs 



Arachnida of Wiltnldre. 381 

I met with one of our finest and most striking looking Lycosids 
{Tarentula cumata, 01k.), and L do not doubt that it would 
occur, locally perhaps, in similar situations throughout the 
county, as it has done also on some parts of the Purbeck Hills, as 
well as near Sherborne, in Dorset. L will not particularise furtlier 
here in respect to any other species, as their being local or rare, 
&c., is noted in such cases, in the list. It will be remarked at 
once, no doubt, that there are no records here in respect to any 
other Orders of the Aracfinida excepting those of the trvji Spidc/rs 
{Araneidea) do\\({ the ^'Harvest Men" (Phalanr/idea), and of this latter 
there is only a list of five species. I myself unfortunately kept no 
list of the P/udanr/iderc that came under my own observation ; but 
out of the recorded British species (about twenty-five) I feel no 
doubt that the greater number would be easily turned up in 
Wiltshire. 

The Order Chernetidea (False-scorpions), though unrepresented 
in the present list by even a single recorded species, would most 
certainly contribute a few of its most widely-distributed forms. 
At present the known P>ritish species are only about twenty-two, 
but every working Ooleopteiist must be familiar with one or two 
of its singular forms, whicli appear to be distributed very widely^ 
and not to be rare in Great Britain. 

Respecting the other great (Jrder of Arachnids {Acaridea) I have 
nothing to say here. There is no one yet in England, so far as I 
know, who seriously takes it up as a whole. Several of its groups 
have been successfully worked at, as the Orihatidce and Irodidif', 
but the "specialist" of Llui whole Order has still to arise. Should 
the publication of the piesent paper induce any of its readers to 
take up the British Anickuldd, seriously, in any of its (^nlers, 1 
would refer them, as to the Ara)ie/ideti, or true spiders, to the late 
Mr. lUacl^waU's great folio work, ])ul)lisluHl in IStJl by (ho Kay 
Society, and the; su1)S(M|U(miL works, " Sftidrrs o/' /><»/•>■</" (l)iinu:ing 
r.lackwall up lo ISSl), by tlio Kov. O. lMckanl-( 'auibridu^'. pub- 
lishtMJ in Ihc IMococdin-s n{ ihr Dorset Natural History and 
Anti'iUMiian l^'icldl Muh, I SSI , ;nul u] i t ndatc in I he annual supph'- 
iucnlarN' |);iiMns ])y llio same autJior. puhlislu'd in t hose 1 *i occc.lin 



382 Arachnida of Wiltshire, 

1882 — 1911 ; as well as in papers by other authors noted therein 
from time to time. For the Phalangidea (or Harvest Men) see 
monograph by E. H. Meade, F.E.C.S., published in Series 2, vol. 
XV., June, 1855, Anncds and Magazine Nat. Hist., with Supplement 
1. c. May, 1881, and a monograph on that order (by the Eev. 0. 
Pickard-Cambridge), published by the Dorset Natural History and 
and Antiquarian Field Club, 1890. On the Ghernetidea or " False- 
Scorpions " a monograph by the Eev. 0. P.-C, Proc. Dorset Field 
Club, 1890, has now been recently followed by Mr. J. Wallis Kew, 
of Werndon Eoad, Wandsworth, in a paper published in The Irish 
Naturalist, June, 1910, and in another paper of a more compre- 
hensive nature, " Synopsis of the False-Scorpions of Britain and 
Ireland,^' in Proceedings of the Eoyal Irish Academy^ vol. xxix.,. 
Sec. 6,^0. 2, 1911. 

The initials added to each of the species in the following list 
are :—O.P.-G. (Eev. 0, Pickard-Cambridge, M.A., F.E.S., Bloxworth, 
Dorset). 

A.F.P. (Col. Arthur Frederick Pickard, E.A., V.C., &c.). 

H.P.B. (Dr. H. P. Blackmore, M.D., &c., Salisbury). 

P.M. (Edward Meyrick, F.E.S., Marlborough College). 

LIST OF WILTSHIEE ARACHNIDA. 

Order Aeaneidea. 

Fam. Dysderidce, 

Dysdera Cambridgii (Thor.) n.P.B. Salisbury. 

„ crocota (C. L. Koch), H.P.B. Salisbury. Widely 

dispersed but rare. 

Harpactes Hotnbergii (Scop.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Segestria senoculata (Linn.). H.P.B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. 
Boy ton. 

Scytodes thoracica (Latr.). H.P.B. Salisbury. A rare and 
remarkable spider ; possibly originally introduced from abroad, but 
it has turned up at Bloxworth and Weymouth, Dorset, and at 
Oxford; and Mr. Blackwall records it from near Dover. Dr. 
Blackmore's specimen was an immature female, and was taken in 



By the liev. 0. Pickard-Camhridge, M.A., F.R.S., &c. 383 

his dining room, which opens out into the garden. On the Con- 
tinent it is, as it also appears to be in I^]n gland so far, a semi- 
domestic species. 

Fam. Drassidm, 

Drassodes lapidosus (Walck). H.P.B. Salisl)ury; O.P.-C- 
Salisbury district. 

Drassus troglodytes (C. L. Koch). ll.P.n, Salisbury ; O-P.C- 
Salisbury district. 

Prosthesima Petiverii (Scop.). ll.p.B. Salisbury. 

,, Latreillii (C. L. Koch). Il.P.n. Salisbury; 

O.P.-C. Alderbury. 
,, nigrita (Fabr.). II.F.B. Salisbury. 

,, rustica (L. Koch). O.P.-C. Salisbury. Very 



rare. 



Micaria pulicaria (L. Koch). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Clubiona terrestris (Westr.). ii.p.B. Salisbury, [borough. 

„ reclusa (Cambr). II.P.B. Salisbury ; U.M. Marl- 

„ neglecta (Cambr.). ILP.li Salisbury. Eare and 

,, pallidula (Clerck.). Il.pji Salisbury. [local. 

ff corticalis (Walck), II.P.B. Salisbury. 

n lutescens (L Koch). A.F.P. Kast Grafton. 

,, holosericea (De Geer). I/.P.n. Salisbury. 

ff brevipes (I>1.). /I/\B. Salisbury. 

,, comta (C. L. Ivocli). //./\/;. S;ili.s])ury. 

ff trivialis (I^. Kocb). //./^/;. Salisbury. 

,r subtilis (h. Koch). //./'./;. Salisbury. 
Chiracanthium carnifex (Fabi.). //./'./;. Salisbury. 
Zora maculata (r.L). //./'./;. Salisbury. 
Anyphaena accentuata i\\';il<k.). //./'./;. s.ilisburv. 

Liocranum domesticum (WiM.) //./'./;, Salisbury; O./' r. 
?^!ilisbuiT ( atb.Mlral, both s.>xfs, Ma\- Iltli, 1S<M. !:ar." and Inr.il. 



384 Arachnida of Wiltshire. 

Fam. Dictynidce, 
Dictyna arundinacea (Linn.). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
,5 uncinata (Westr.). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
„- latens (Fabr.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
5, variabilis (C. L. Koch). H.P.B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. 
Eoyton. Eare and local. 

Amaurobius ferox (Walck) . H.P.B. Salisbury. 
„ similis (Bl). A.F.P. East Grafton. 

5, fenestralis (Stroem.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Fani. Agelenidce. 
^Coelotes terrestris (Wid.). h.P.B, Salisbury. 
„ atropos (Walck.). O.P.G. Alderbury. 

Agelena labyrinthica (Clerck.). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
Tegenaria atrica (C. L. Koch). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
,, parietina (Fourcroy). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

55 Derhamii (Scop.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

,, silvestris (C. L Koch). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Cicurina cinerea (Panz.). h.P.B. Salisbury. Widely dis- 
tributed but rare. 

Antistea elegans (C. L. Koch). H.P.B. Salisbury. Chiefly 
conlined to swampy spots. 

Hahnia nava (BL). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
,, montana (BL). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Fam. Pholcidm. 

Pholcus phalangioides (Fuessl). H.P.B. Salisbury. An 
abundant house spider in the South of England. 

^ This species was first recorded as British under the name of C. pabulator 
(Simon) from examples found by Dr. Blackmore, Proc. Dorset Natural 
History and Antiquarian Field Club, vol. x., p. 113, fig. 2. It has, how- 
ever, since been ascertained to be identical with C. terrestris (Wid.) recorded 
from the New Forest in 1894, and has also occurred since in other parts of 
Oreat Britain. 



By the Rev. 0. Fickard-Cambridge, M.A,, F.IIS., &g. 385 
Fani. Theridiidce. 

Episinus truncatus (Walck.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Theridion formosum (Clerck,)- HJ\B. Salisbury. Local and 

rare, in woods and shrubberies. 
„ tepidariorum (0. L. Kocli). H.P.b. Salisbury. 
Found in most green- and hot- 
houses throughout the kingdom. 
,, pictum (Hahn) S. P,P, Salisbury. Local and rare. 

„ sisyphium (Clerck.). HJ\B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. 

East Grafton. 
,, denticulatum (Walck.). K.P.B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. 

Boyton. 
„ varians (Hahn). H.P.B. Salisbury; ^.i^^P. Boyton 

and East Grafton. 
,, tinctum (Walck). E.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. 

Boyton. Local. 
„ vittatum (C. L, Koch). R.p.B. Salisbury. 

„ bimaculatum (Linn) S.P.B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. 

East Grafton. 
„ pallens (Bl.) Jl.pjj, Salisbury ; A.F.P. Boyton 

and East Grafton. Generally common and forms a pretty little 
white egg-cocoon of a pear shape, with several prominent points, 
under the leaves of laurel and other shrubs. 

Phyllonethis lineata (Clerck). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

n lepida (Walck). H.P.B. Salisbury. Local ; in 

swampy places. 

Steatoda bipunctata (Linn.). H.P.n. Salisbury. Li garden 
sheds, ()uUi()u,s(3.s, and unnsed rooms. 

Crustulina guttata (Wid.). //./'./;. Sali.sijmy. Am mi- 
herbage in waste places; not coumion. 

Euryopis flavomaculata (C. L. Koeh). //./'./;. Sahsbmy. 

L')eal and rare. 

Robertus lividus (lU.). //./'./>•. Sahsbmv. 



386 Arachnida of Wiltshire. 

Tapinopa longidens (Wid.). B.P.B. Salisbury. 

Bolyphantes bucculentus (Clerck). b,p.b. Salisbury. 

Drapetisca socialis (Sund.). H.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. 
Boy ton. Chiefly found on the trunks of fir and other trees. 

Linyphia clathrata (Sund.). B.P.B. Salisbury ; A,F.P. 
East Grafton. 
hortensis (Sund.). E.M. Marlborough. 
triangularis (Clerck). S.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. 

Boy ton. 
marginata (C. L. Koch.). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
peltata (Sund.), F.M. Marlborough. 
impigra (Cambr.). H.P.B. Salisbury. Eare and 

local, generally in swampy places. 
montana (Clerck). F.M. Marlborough. 
insignis (Bl.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Taranucnus setosus (Cambr.) H.P.B. Salisbury. Local ; in 
marshy places. 

Leptyphantes minutus (Bl.). h.P.b. Salisbury; A.F.P. 

Boyton. 
„ leprosus (Ohl.). h.P.B. Salisbury. 

,, Blacfcwallii (Kulcz). H.P.B. Salisbury; 

A.F.P. Boyton. 
,, tenuis (Bl.), H.P.B. Salisbury. 

„ cristatus (Menge). A.F.P. Boyton. 

,5 terricola (C. L. Koch). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Bathyphantes approximatus (Cambr.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 
pullatus (Cambr.). E.M. Marlborough. 
gracilis (Bl.). H.p.b. Salisbury. 
nigrinus (Westr). e.M. Marlborough, 
dorsalis (Wid.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
concolor (Wid.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Microneta rurestris (C. L. Koch). h.p,b. Salisbury. 



By the Rev. 0. Fickard-Camhridr/e, M.A., F.RS., &c. 387 

Microneta viaria (BL). H.P.B, Salisbury. 

,, innotabilis (Cambr.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Hilaira uncata (Canibr.). II.P.B. Salisbury. Widely dis- 
tributed, but local in marshy places. 

Maso Sundevallii (Westr.). A.F.P. Boyton. 
Tmeticus rufus (Wid.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Gongylidium graminicolum (Sund.). H.P^b. Salisbury. 
,, rufipes (Suud.). H.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. East 

Grafton; E.M. Marlborough. 

Sintula cornigera (Bl.). H.P.B. Salisbury, Very rare and 
local, but widely distributed. 

Erigone atra (BL). H.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. Boyton. 

,, dentipalpis (Wid.). H.p.b. Salisbury. 

Neriene rubens (Bl.). I[.p.b. Salisbury. 
Enidea (Neriene) cot n\x\ a, (BL). h.P.b. Salisbury. 

,, bituberculata (Wid.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Diplocephalus cristatus (I'l). II.P.b. Salisbury. 
Cnephalocotes (Walckenaera) obscurus (BL). H.P.B. 
Salisbury. 
! Walckenaera nudipalpis (AVestr.). h.P.b. Salisbury. 

Prosopotheca monoceros (Wid.). h.P.b. Salisbury. Local 
! and rare. 

1 Cornicularia unicornis (Cambr.). H.p.b. Salisbury. 
Nesticus cellulanus (Clk,). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Fam. Mimetidce. 
Ero thoracica (Wid.), h.p.b. Salisbury. 

Fam. EiKirido:. 

Sub-F;un. Ti'trdfjiudJiiiur. 
Tetragnatha extensa ( Liini.) //./'.//. SalisLmv ; ,/./•'./•. 

Uoyton and l^asl (Jiaflon. 
,, solandrii (Sc.i..). F.M. ALullx'i-nuoli. 



388 Arachnida of Wiltshire. 

Pachygnatha Clerckii (Sund.) S.P.b. Salisbury. 

,, Degeerii (Sund.) S.P.B. Salisbury ; £.M, 

Marlborough. 

Meta segmcntata (Clerck.). H.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.F 
East Grafton ; B.M. Marlborough. 
„ Merianae (Scop.). JET.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. East 

Grafton. 
„ menardi (Latr.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Sub-fam. Argiopince. 

Cyclosa conica (Pall). H.P.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. Boyton. 
Singa pygmaea (Sund.). E.M. Marlborough. 

Sub-fam. Epeirince. 
Zilla X-notata (Clk.). H.P.B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. East Grafton 

and Boyton. 
,, atrica (C. L. Koch.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Epeira cucurbitina (Clerck.). H.P.B. Salisbury ; A.F.P. East 
Grafton and Boyton ; E.M. Marlborough. 
„ diademata (Clk.). E.p.b. Salisbury. 
„ pyramidata (Clk.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
„ gibbosa (Walck.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
,, agalena Blackwal (Walck.). h.P.B. Salisbury. 
5, Redii (Scop.). E.M. Marlborough. 
„ cornuta (Clk.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
„ sclopetaria (Clk.). H.p.b. Salisbury. 
„ quadrata (Clk.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 
„ umbratica (Clk.). h.p.b. Salisbury; ^.F.P. Boyton; 
E.M. Marlborough. 

Fam. Thomisidce. 

Misumena vatia (Clk.) h.p.b. Salisbury. 

Diaeadorsata (Fabr.). ^.P.^. Salisbury ; .E'.ilf. Marlborough. 



By the Rev, 0. Pickard-Ca'nihndgc, M.A., FJi:S., &c, 380 

Xysticus cristatus (Clk.). H.F.B. Salisbury; AF.V, East 
Grafton; E.M. Marlborough. 

Xysticus pini (Hahn.) H.P.B. Salisbury. 

„ lanio (C. L. Koch.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

,, ulmi(Hahn). i/.P.Z?. Salisbury ; .fi^.ilf. Marlborough. 

Local, but wid(3ly distributed. 

Xysticus erraticus (Bl.). H.P.B. Salisbury. Widely dis- 
tributed but rare. 

Oxyptila atomaria (I'anz.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 

,, praticola (C. L. Koch.). H.F.B. Salisbury; A.F.P. 

Boyton. 

Philodromus margaritatus (Clk.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
,, dispar (Walck.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

,, aureolus (Clk). H.p.b. Salisbury ; A.F.P. 

Boytou. 
,, praedatus (Cambr.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 

Thanatus striatus (0. L. Koch.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
Tibellus oblongus (Bl.) H.p.b, Salisbury. 

Eani Sparassidm. 

Micrommata virescens (Clk.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 
Fani. Pisauridcv. 

Pisaura mirabilis (Clk.). h.p.b. Salisbury; E.M. Marl- 
borough. 

Fam. Ljjr.osidce. 

Pirata piraticus (Clk.). H.V.U. Salisbury. 

,, hygrophilus (Thor.) H.r.n. Salisbmy. 
latitans (BL). n.r.B. Salisbury. 

Trochosa ruricola (Degcer). ii.r.u. Salis])uiy. 
„ terricola (Th..r.) //./'./,'. Salisluny. 



390 Arachnida of Wiltshire. 

Tarentula pulverulenta (Clk,). e.f.b. Salisbury. 

5, CUneata (Clk.)- O.P.-C. Norton Bavant, near 

Warminster. Local and rare. 
,, andrenivora (Walck). h.p.b. Salisbury. 

Lycosa amentata (Clk.). h.p.b. Salisbury; E.M. Marl- 
borough. 
5; annulata (Tbor.). h.p.b. Salisbury; O.P.-G. Alder- 
bury. 
„ pulIata(Clk.). E.M- Marlborough. 
„ nigriceps (Thor.). H.P.B. Salisbury; E.M. Marl- 
borough. 
„ prativaga (C. L. Koch.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 
„ monticola (Clk.). A.F.P. Boy ton. 

Fam. Salticidce. 
Epiblemum scenicum (Clk.). h.p.b. Salisbury; .£'. /if. Marl- 
borough. 
,, cingulatum (Panz.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 

Heliophanus cupreus (Walck.). h.p.b. Salisbury. 

„ flavipes (C. L. Koch.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Euophrys frontalis (Walck.). h.p.b, Salisbury. 

,, aequipes (Cambr.). h.p.b. Salisbury. Local and 

rare. 

AttUS pubescens (Fabr.). h.p.b. Sahsbury. 

5, caricis (Westr.). H.P.B. Salisbury. Local and very 
rare. 

Hasarius falcatus (Clk.). H.P.B. Salisbury. 

Order Phalangidea (Harvest Men). j 

Phalangium opilio (Linn.). A.F.P. Boy ton. I 

5, parietinum. A.F.P. Boyton. 

Oligolophus agrestis (Meade). A.F.P. Boyton. 
Megabunus insignis (Meade). e.M. Marlborough. 
Platybunuscorniger (Herm). E.M. Marlborough. 



1 ,' • i > u?.wvi,i ' i') ' "H 




i/V"iyj!V"W'"';.:<v:-.^::;V-.*y'" " 
. ■• ',..tw .',', . — .■'<■•; iv:;iv -I 








Bewley Court. First Floor Plan. 



BLACK = 14th Century Work. Cross Hatching= 15th Century Work 

Single HATCHiNG=17th Century Work. DoTTiNG = Later and Modern. 




Bl-:\VMn- COUKT. LONOITUDINAL SECTION! LOOKIXC; SOUTl 




r.l-.WI.I ^ C'OUIM'. SOUIII i{l.l.\ ATIt)\. 



Scale ,'.- inch I loot. 





Bewley Court. East Elevation. 




Bewley Court. West Elevation. 



Scale ^g inch — 1 to 




'iSS^ 



Bewley Court. Cross Section looking West. 




Hh\vli;v CoLKi. Cross Skchon lookinc. IiAsr. 

S.cilf ,', incli 1 t\)ol. 




Bewley Court. Front Door. 




f/f;^. ' '^ 




^H/Sii4 




m 




f 




^^r^^i- 




lii-.w i.i-.N Col u\ . W i;si SiDi-: 




Bewley Coukt. Window of Hall. 




^^^^3^-" 




lii-.w i.i-.N dn Ki. AixC 



\ 11 VI. I. 



191 



BEWLEY COUET, LACOCK. 
By Harold Brakspeak, F.S.A. 

Some three miles down the Avon from Chippenham, almost 
opposite Lacock Abbey, is Bewley Court, an old house of which 
the history is little known. It retains some of the earliest domestic 
work in the county, and being within the forest of Chippenham 
was in the first place, as might have been expected, built almost 
entirely of wood. 

The present house embraces one of the fourteenth century, which 
consisted of a hall, placed east and west, a room over a cellar at 
the west end, and a two-storied wing partly built in stone at right 
angles to the hall, at the east end. The hall roof, the west gable, 
and part of the south wall adjoining, together with the chimney of 
the great chamber in the east wing, still remain. 

In the fifteenth century extensive works in stone were carried 
out, which consisted of underbuilding the hall roof, adding a new 
south front, some six feet in advance of the old, and re-building 
the east wing, excepting the chimney. 

Early in the sixteenth century the window on the south side of 
the hall was altered. 

Some time ])etween 1540 and 1548 tlie property was sold hy the 
Darrells of Littlecote to Sir William Sharin£jton,Gjranteeof Lacock 
Abbey after the Suppression. In the latter year tlic houst' con- 
sisted of : — 

"A iiall, ;i j)ailL'r, w^ a chamber over the parlcr acHoyningr to tlir 
.seid hall, a buttery joynyng to the hall w' a chanilier over tlie l>uttery 
it another chamber above at thende of the seid chamber, that is over 
the Inittery a grett Chamber over the porche dore and a litle chamber 
at the end of the f^reat Chamber, A Shoppe witli a chandler over the 
Shoppe, a Kcoliyii w' ij wliite hou.ses at thend of tlie seid Shoppe, 
all lying together under oon KiitV coiitfynyng ix frMs." 
VOL. .\.xxvii. — NO. rxvii. '2 K 



392 * Bewley Court, Lacock. 

There was also 

" A gardyn [garner] for come conteyning j Rome, a stable of iij 
Romes, a Barton, a garden and an orchard conteynynge j acre of 
pasture." ^ 

Bewley Court was afterwards exchanged for other property with 
Edward Baynard, of Lackham, and passed upon the death of his 
son, Sir Robert, in 1636,' with the Lackham property to the 
Montagu family, through the marriage of his heiress, Mary, to 
Captain James Montagu.^ 

Early in the seventeenth century the house was considerably 
altered, the hall being divided by two floors to form extra rooms 
and a large dormer inserted in the roof on the south side. The 
hall chimney and north oriel were removed and large wooden 
mullioned windows inserted to light the first floor. Later in the 
same century the east wing was altered and the northei'n end 
partly re-built. 

From this date nothing was done to the house until, having 
fallen into a dangerous state, certain repairs were undertaken in 
1897 chiefly to the hall roof ; and the large dormer was removed. 

In 1902 the property was acquired by the present owner, Mr. 
G. LI, Palmer,^ of Lackham, who as soon as it came into his hands 
instructed the writer to prepare a complete set of drawings of the 
house as it stood and to carry out certain repairs and alterations. 
These latter consisted of the removal of the two floors within the 
hall, the re-building the hall chimney and building a portion of a 
new double-storied passage at the back of the hall, which will be 
required if the house be again converted into a residence, as is 
intended when the opportunity arises. 

The house is at present reached from a road on the east across 
a farm yard, and it is difficult to trace the original approach. There 

' A Survey of Manors, (tc, belonging to Sir William Sharington made hy 
Stephen Cole, Gentleman, Surveyor and Steward, 2 Ed. vi., 25&. In the 
possession of Mr. C. H. Talbot, of Lacock Abbey, and kindly transcribed 
for me by the Rev. W. G. Clark-Maxwell, M.A., F.S.A. 

^ Wilts Inquisitiones Post Mortem, Charles I. (London, 1901), p. 330. 

^ The Society is indebted to Mr. G. LI. Palmer for a donation of £b to- 
wards the cost of the illustrations of this paper. 



By Harold Braks-pcar, F.S.A. 



39:i 



is a ditch on the soutli and along part of the garden on the west, 
and it seems tliat the wliole site was originally protected on all 
four sides. 

There is a low-walled garden in front of the house having in the 
middle of the south wall two square piers, surmounted by turned 
vases of late seventeenth century date, belonging to the entrance 
gate. From these a straight walk leads up to the porch. This is 



I 11 _ __ 




I'jitraiKH' Doorway 



■ liU'i'ed 1)V a wide doorway of two moulded nuMiibers, ihe oiiior of 

wlncli is s(|uare-headod and \\\v iiiiHMa llaL four-centred an-h wiili 

usixhI span.h-ils. On oiLhor sido arc small Hal i>ilaslcrs. willi 



394 Beivley Court, Lacoch. 

moulded bases, supporting a brattished cornice over the door, and 
finished at the top with small pedimented pinnacles. The door is 
the original one formed of wide planks studded with rows of nails 
and hung with long strap hinges. The escutcheon of the handle 
remains. 

Inside the door is a porch 9ft. deep and 7ft. wide. 

Opposite this entrance is the inner doorway to the hall, which 
has a four-centred arch of a single hollow-chamfered member and 
sunk spandrils. It retains its original door, of similar construction 
to the outer one. 

The hall is 27ift. in length by 18fft. in width, and IGJft. high 
to the wall-plate of the roof. The dais was at the west end with 
square oriels on either side, the fireplace is in the middle of the 
north wall, and across the east end were the screens. 

The west end of the hall is part of the first work and is con- 
structed of timber framing with curved braces supported on a low 
sleeper wall of masonry. There are no original openings in this 
wall. 

The north wall has at its west end a pointed archway, of two 
hollow chamfered members, which opened into the oriel now 
destroyed. In the middle of the wall is the great fireplace, which 
is an insertion, though only slightly later in date than the wall. 
It is 8ft. wide, and the head is of one stone lOJft. in length by 
34in. high, formed into a depressed arch.^ At the east end of the 
wall under the screens is a doorway to the inner court which has 
a four-centred head and sunk spandrils and retains its original 
door of similar character to those of the porch. 

The east end of the hall had only one doorway, which is of a 
single-moulded member with a four-centred head. This door led 
to the buttery. Above this doorway the upper part of the wall is 
carried upon a boldly-projecting moulded course, which has been 
partly destroyed. 

On the south side under the screens is the back of the entrance 
door from the porch, which has the curious feature of the spandrils, 

The fireplace head at Great Chalfield, of slightly earlier date, also of 
one stone, is 12ft. long by 4ft. high, and ISjin. thick. 



By Harold Brahspear, F.S.A. 395 

between the door rebate and the lintel, being moulded and .sunk. 
At the west end of the south wall is an archway, similar to that 
opposite, which opens into the south oriel. 

The north and south walls, between the oriel arches and the 
screens, are sunk some 4in. behind the rest of the wall face, Tlie 
break at either end is formed by a moulded jamb, of which the 
inner member is returned at 8ft. from the floor as a string course 
and the outer member is carried up and returned as a cornice under 
the roof. 

The hall i-oof is supported in the middle of its length by a 
framed couple, formed, as is tlie local manner of roof of the 
fourteenth century, with two tapering side principals and a collar 
at little more than half height, from which spring two smaller 
arched principals against which the main principals stop.^ There 
are arched braces beneath the main principals to the under side of 
the collar. This couple is supported upon the walls by boldly- 
projecting semi-octagonal, moulded and brattished corbels in stone, 
carried by a small shaft in connection with the string-course 
already described. There is a similar half-couple at the east end 
of the hall. A single purlin, with band-moulded chamfer, carries 
the rafters on each side, and from the purlin and the wall plates 
spring large arched wind-braces which have their faces enriched 
willi a series of circles Idled with sunk six-rayed stars. One or 
two of the circles next the springers have in them flowing tracery. 
When the roof was underbuilt a wooden cornice with brattished 
top was inserted at the level of the plates. Only a few of the 
miginal rafters remain, and they, together with the middle couple, 
iire much covered with soot, showing that in the original building, 
to which the roof belongs, the lire was u[)on a central hearth similar 
to that of the same date still remaining at Penshurst Place. 

The noiLliern oriel has Ihmmi couipletely destroyed willi iis 
fuundal,ion, cxcopt Iho jamb of lIic window adjoining the east 
jnnd) of its archway. This is grooved for glass and shows that the 
sill was .")^, ft. abov(^ the tloor, and that the lights wme ."..U'l. higli 
with eusj.ed heads. 

' The roof of the great barn at Bradford-on-Avon is made in the same 

way, :i.=; are various cotta.ii^o roofs in I. acock villai^c. 



396 Bewley Court, Lacock. 

This window was almost if not quite blocked up, when the fire- 
place was added, by the chimney breast on the outside. 

The southern oriel has a two-light window, with plain four- 
centred heads and a transom, in the south wall. The heads are a 
substitution of Tudor date for a pointed head, which was doubtless 
filled with tracery. The indication of the arch shows on the 
outside. The window was fitted with wooden frames and had no 
groove for glass. It still retains its original ironwork, consisting 
of saddle bars and two stanchions in each light. On the west side 
of the oriel is a small doorway, but the head has been destroyed. 
Between this and the south wall is a locker 3ft. 9in. in height by 
1ft. llin. wide divided in two by a stone shelf 6|in. thick. Both 
divisions retain their original oak lining. 

The hall roof, with the ornamental wind-braces, is continued 
another bay westward over a room of the same width as the hall 
which is raised above what was in the first place a cellar. The 
room was originally open to the roof, but a floor was inserted at 
the level of the plate at the same time as the hall was similarly 
treated. The room was gained originally by an outside staircase 
on the south side, the doorway at the top of which still remains. 
It is 2ft. lOin. wide and has a semicircular head. The original 
timber-framed wall remains on the whole of the south side of this 
room. The west end and gable above is also mostly of the original 
timber-framed work, though the middle part has been removed 
owing to the insertion of a large chimney breast in the fifteenth 
century. The upper part of the front is carried upon the ends of 
the floor joists which project some 14in. in front of the cellar wall. 
There is an original two-light window on the north side of the 
chimney, having ogee heads, and the head of a similar window, but 
of three lights, remains on the opposite side. The mullions of this 
last have been removed and a small bay of seventeenth century 
date inserted. The fireplace has a simple flat-headed arch carried 
upon elbows. The north end of this room has been cut off for a 
staircase which led to the inserted floor above and down to the 
cellar. This cellar had, by the time the staircase was put in, been 
converted into a parlour. It has a fireplace of Queen Anne's time 



By Harold Broksiiear, F.S.A. 397 

and the timber-framed wall on either side has been removed to 
insert two large windows, though the original angle posts and two 
others next the chimney breast remain with arched brackets to 
the oversailing part above. 

In the fifteenth century the cellar was enlarged southward to 
line with the oriel of the hall but there are no windows in the 
added part. There is a small room over reached from the upper 
chamber already described by a doorway in the south-east angle, 
and there is a small two-light window with cusped heads in the 
south wall liaving rebates for wooden frames to hold the glazing. 

In the east side of the south oriel is a four-centred moulded 
archway from which a staircase 5ft. wide leads up to the great 
chamber. The stairs are crossed by a four-centred moulded arch 
opposite the roof couple to take its thrust. At the top of the 
stairs is a four-centred moulded doorway, of two members, the 
outer of which is square and the spandrils are sunk. It retains 
its original door, formed of oak planks and thickly studded with 
nails and has a drop handle with escallopped escutcheon. In the 
wall to the right is a small square window which originally was 
filled with a quatrefoil, but the cusps have been broken off. 

Externally the south side is mostly faced with ashlar. There 
are l)uttresses at all the angles and two others on the wall westward 
of the porch. This wall was finished by a moulded cornice and 
para.[)et, of which remains show at the west end. The parapet 
and cornice were continued round the porch but at a higher level 
aiul a small })iece remains next the gable of the east wing. 

An interesting point may be noticed with respect to the entrance 
ddorway and that at the top of the stairs, and this is that a precisely 
similar doorway to the former occurs at Chippenham Church/ and 
one like the latter at Lacock Church, in both cases tlie doorways 
aic insertions, but. whotlior llioy cauio from sonic dtMiiolishoil ])art 
• '!' r.owley Court or were only worked l)y the same masons from 
tln' same teni])latt\s. it is im])ossible to say. 

Inside the door at the to[) of the stairs is a lobby o\ tn- the poieh. 

' This i.^ without tho side piors and brattishcd corniro of Bewlcy find is 
-'ill. wider in th(> o|i('iiin;4. 



398 Bewley Court, Lacock. 

In the south wall is a two-light window with cusped heads re- 
taining its original stanchions and saddle bars. In the wall 
opposite is a doorway into the gallery over the screens. It has a 
circular head and is part of the original timber-framed building. 
On the east side of the lobby was the door into the great chamber 
which is now represented by a modern one. 

The great chamber is 21^ft. long by 14:^ft. wide and occupied the 
southern part of the east wing and was open to the roof. It was 
lighted by a tall bay window in the south gable, which was supported 
by a centre buttress similar to that at Great Chalfield and covered 
by a stone roof ; but this has been destroyed. The inner jambs and 
moulded rere-arch, however, remain. There is a fireplace in the 
east wall that has a sixteenth century stone chimney piece and 
doubtless the remains of the earlier openings exist under the plaster. 
The chimney above is of the fourteenth century and consists of a 
circular tun with moulded capital, upon a stack with two series 
of sets-off, carried by a centre buttress and two moulded corbels. 
The roof is of the fifteenth century alterations, and is divided into 
three bays by framed arched principals, the middle rafter of each 
bay is larger than the others. There is a single purlin on either 
side with arched wind braces, of which those in the lower division 
spring from the couples and those in the upper from both the 
couples and middle rafters. 

The room was much altered in the seventeenth century, when a 
ceiling was added at the level of the wall plates, the south window 
was replaced by one of two lights, and another window of three 
lights was inserted in the east wall. There is the bulk-head in the 
north-east corner of a small staircase, which leads from the room 
below to the gallery over the screens, covered by a good chest of 
drawers of contemporary date. 

The space beneath the great chamber was originally the buttery, 
which would be divided by partitions into buttery and pantry with 
a lobby of entrance to the kitchen. It was altered in the seven- 
teenth century to form a sitting room with windows in the south 
and east walls, similar to those in the great chamber above, and a 
fireplace was inserted on the south side at a still later date of 
which the flue is carried in a brick chimney. 



By Harold Brakspear, F.S.A. 399 

The rest of the east wing is occupied by the kitchen, a room for 
the most part of the seventeenth century, but it retains on the 
outside the north-east angle l)uttress of the earlier work. The 
north wall is 7|ft. in thickness and contains the great fireplace^ 
with a cupboard on either side of contemporary date, and there 
is a three-light window in the east wall and one of two lights 
opposite, both of which have window seats with oak panelled 
backs. Originally the kitchen was open to the roof, but it has 
now a room above with a three-light window in the east wall and 
a fireplace in the north. The roof is of the same date as that over 
the great chamber. 

The position of "The Shoppe" and its use is not clear, but it 
was apparently in the angle formed by the hall and kitchen, and 
must have been removed before the kitchen was altered in the 
seventeenth century, on account of the window of that date on the 
west side of the kitchen. 

There is a seventeenth century outhouse north of the kitchen 
with a later bakehouse beyond, but neither contains anything of 
interest. There is, further north, a seventeenth century privy, 
the south wall of which seems to have been continued as the north 
wall of the inner court. 

Before the late alterations there was a pentise carried on wooden 
posts at the back of the hall, which returned northwards as far 
as the door into the outhouse. 

Bewley Court has passed through many hands with varied 
fortune, but is now, though only used to house a caretaker, well 
cared for, and no further damage from neglect is ever likely to 
occur ill future. 



' Thr <j:vrA\ \\\\ckuc>> of this wall may iinlicatf that |>art.>^ of th«» fifteenth 
•tMitury tirciilaiT rrniain tin»h.M- tin- I'la.stcr. 



400 



NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF WROUGHTON. 
By Thereza Story Maskelyne. 

Weoughton. 

At the time of the compilation of Domesday Book, the present 
village of "Wroughton consisted of four manors, namely : — Wertune, 
held by Humphrey de ITsle: Ellendune, by the Bishop of Win- 
chester ; Wervetone, by Aldred, from the King, and Elcome, by 
Alberic ; ^ all at that time in the ancient Hundred of Blachengrave. 

Wroughton is now (1912) a very large village with over two 
thousand inhabitants, but in the year 1676 only two hundred and 
sixty people lived there, of whom only one was a non-conformist, 
all the rest being conformists.^ 

It was not until about the year 1493 that Wroughton was the 
recognised name of the Church, for it is under that date that the 
name is first given as "Wroughton, alias Elyndon " in Sir Thomas 
tPhilipps' Wilts Institutions. Before that time, from the first entry 
in 1304 A.D. the name is invariably given as Elyndon, and 
even as late as the year 1875 the Eev. J. R. Turner, on making 
enquiries at Gloucester about the living, was told that there was 
no place of the name o£ Wroughton on the ecclesiastical registers, 
and it was under the name of Elyndon that it was eventually found. 

Elyndon is another form of Ellendune, one of the manors des- 
cribed in Domesday as held by the Bishop of Winchester " for the 
support of the monks." 

^ Canon Jones' Domesday for Wilts. 

" Lambeth MS. 639, lias, among various documents bound together, an 
account of the number and proportions of Roman Recusants, obstinate 
Separatists, Conformists, and Inhabitants, in Wiltshire and. Berkshire — 
Bishopric Sarum ; by Seth Ward. May 10, 1676. 

Decanatus Cricklade. v. Elingdon alias Wroughton. J. Goldingham cur. 
Conformists 259 

Papists 

Nonconformists 1 

Inhabitants 260 



\ 



Notes on the Hiatory of Wrougltton. 401 

Elleiiclune is also the name of the famous battle fought near this 
place between Egbert, King of Wessex, and Beornwulf, of Mercia, in 
823 A.D., as recorded in the Winchester annals^ in these words : — 
*' Locus apud Ellendune nuinerium nunc Prioris Wintoniensis ; " and 
as we have a continuous history of the manor from the days of 
Edward the Confessor down to the present time there can be no 
doul)t that the modern Elyndon Wroughton is the ancient 
Ellendune. 

Leland's error as to the locality of Ellendune probably arose 
from the alteration of one letter, l)y whicli Winton was written 
Wilton, an error long since pointed out by Sir E. Colt Hoare in 
his Ilegistritm Wiltunense (published in 1827 — p. 545) where he 
traces the source of Leland's confusion to a certain Harry Crump, 
an Irishman living in Eichard the Second's reign, in 1392 ; and 
he goes on to say that Ellendune is never mentioned in the Wilton 
Cartulary. 

Ellingham and Allington^ have also ])een supposed possible 
localities for old Ellendune, by authors ignorant of the fact that 
Ellendune was a Winchester manor. Professor Oman, in his 
recent history, repeats the error, but has certified his intention of 
correcting it in the next edition.^ 

Tlie firsb records of Ellendune that we know of are contained in 
the Malmesbury charters, l)y which we hnd that before becoming 
;i Winchester manor it must have belonged to Malmesbury, but 
when the change of ownership took place is uidvuown, and till the 
archives of Winchester have been examined with a vii^w to 
ascertaining the eai'liest date at which l^^llciulune is given as a 
WincluNster manor we cannot Icll the exact date when t-his 
lia]»{)ened. 



' A twelfth century cartulary made by the monks of S. Swithin Priory at 
Wiiu'hester, transcrilxd hy Mr. i)inli, (Jarf. Sax.^ Coilix Wintoni' nsis, ii 
fdl. vol. ill the P,rit. .Muxmuu. 

- .Mliii-toii apprars as AihHiiutoii uinlcr Ahnnl, I'l' Marihoroii^'lj, in 
I )i'nu',s(lay, and was lu-vfr a W'iiiclicstcr manor. 

•' ( )mairs ///.s7or// of' Kin/ldinl hij'oir the Norinnn Conque»t. 



402 Notes on the History of Wroitghtoii. 

Lelaiid's statement^ that Athelstan gave Ellendune to Winchester 
is not borne out by what he says in another passage {Collectanea, 
I., 429)^ or by Dugdale's Monasticon (I. 206),^ for in neither is 
Ellendune included in the three recorded manors given by Athelstan 
to Winchester. 

The Malmesbury charters prove that Ellendune belonged to 
Malmesbury before 956 A.D., and it is also certain that not long 
after Athelstan's death, somewhere between 956 and 1066, it passed 
into the hands of Winchester. 

The connection between Ellendune and Malmesbury is of great 
interest when we remember the place Malmesbury occupied in the 
early Church ; or realize what the Bishop of Bristol has so well 
pointed out in his Life of St. Aldhelm, that "few if any of 
the archaeological and ecclesiastical interests of England are greater 
than those which gather in the earliest times around Malmesbury. No 
other British place remained undisturbed with its complete British life 
and work, right out among the Saxons geographically, and right out into 
Saxon history as Malmesbury did " " and nowhere in England have we so 
unbroken a connection between the British and Saxon Church life and 
teaching as at Malmesbury. When St. Augustine about A.D. 600 (fifty years 
before the breaking up of the Selwood Forest Britons) turned his thoughts 
westward to what Bede'* called ' the next province of the Britons ' he would 
naturally fix on the frontier fortress on the heightsof Malmesbury as a place 
where he might find Christians of the old British Church." 

" As a matter of geography it cannot be disputed that the British inhabit- 
ants of that part of Selwood which lay north of Frome up as far as 
Cricklade, were to Augustine the nearest province of the Britons," 

and we know that the frontier fortress of Malmesbury lay on the 
Koman road from Bath to Cirencester. 

It was at Malmesbury not long afterwards that Maildubh sought 
refuge (circ. 634), and Aldhelm and a band of scholars gathered 
around him. 

^ Leland's Itinerary^ iii., p. 102, under " ex libello Donationum Winton 
Eccl." : " JEthelstanus rex dedit Chilboltun et Elendon quod est Werston." 

2 Leland's Collectanea, I., 429, under Fundatores principales Cathedree 
S. Swithini Winton "tria maneria Chiboltoun Enedford et Hamerisword." 

^ The Winton account of the donations in Dugdale Mon., I., 206 : "Edel- 
stanus Bex Anglise dedit tria maneria Chibeldinham Enedford et Eismeres- 
wordam." 

■* Bede, Eccl. History, by J. Giles. Bohn's Library, p. 68. 



By Thereza Story Maskdyne. 403 

Tlie following MahiieHbury chai'b(3rs throw light on the connection 
with Ellendune : — 

No. 7 of the charters as given in J. Y. Akerman's paper " On the Pos- 
sessions of Mahneshury Abbey" {Archeologia, xxxvii., 257), is dated Aug' 
19, 688. " Ceadunealla of Wessex made a donation of XXX nianentes on 
the east side of Braden to Mahnesbury Abbey." ' 

" In the same year 688 Aldhelm exchanged this with one Baldred for 
lands nearer the Abbey. But somehow this exchange seems to have gone 
wrong, and the original gift remained in force." - 

A charter of Nov. 5th, 844, states that /Ethelwulf of Wessex 
confirmed previous grants of land to the Abbey, and amongst them 
is one which probably applies to the land in question, as it is re- 
corded as " D?et is at Ellendune thirty hide/'-^ 

The Rolls Series Reg. Malm. I. 294, gives the following grant of 
tithes to Mahnesbury by Ethelwulf, land "that is at Ellendune 
thritty hyde." Evidently the same transaction as is recorded in 
the charter of Nov. 5th, 844. 

Later on we get another clue to the history of this land,^ stating 
that Eadwig in 956 A.D. granted " xxx mansas at Ellendune to his 
faithful minister and relative ^Ifheah," and as the land limits of 
Elhindune are recorded in the same document they presumably 
apply to the same land. 

Akerman in the paper mentioned above {ArcJiccoloyia, xxxvii., 
266) alludes to King Eadwig's great exchanges of land near 
]\Ialniesbury — which he says "enabled the monks to j'oin ujt this 
land into one compact territory." 

Finally, we learn from No. 24 of the Mahnesbury charters (C.lJ. 
:)9o) that ^Ifheah ])y his will {circ. 956—975 A.D.) bequeathed 
land to Churches in liath and Wiiiche.sler, and assuming this gift 
to Winchester to have been the xxx numentes at Ellendune given 
in 956 by King Eadwig to .Elfheali, we liave a ])ossibh» (due as 
to how ami when this land came to 1)0 u Winchester manor, for, 
as we have alieady stated, in lulwanl tht; Confessor's time. 



' Manentes were tenants who were confined to the land. 

- hettt-r from tlio liislu.p of liri.stol. •' CD. 1048 Cart. S:vx. 4 1. 
* (M ). 1 IS4 Carl. Sax. 9-18. 



404 Notes on the History of Wroicghton, 

Elleudune was a Winchester manor held for the support of the 
monks, and is so described in Domesday. 

The existence of a Church at an even earlier date is proved by 
the mention of a Church highway in the land limits of EUendune 
in 956 A.D. (C.I). 1184), the same document which records King 
Ead wig's gift of land at EUendune to JElfheah. 

The first record we have of the " clericus " or priest of Elyndone 
is given under date 1304 in Sir Thomas Phillipp's Wilts Institutions, 
when the King, in lieu of the Bishop of "Wynton," appointed 
Theobaldus de Thurkedene as clericus ; but even earlier than this, 
a Papal license of 1243 shows that the Prior and Brethren of 
Winchester were called upon to administer the Church on their 
property at Nether Werston. Nether or Lower Werston is at the 
foot of a hill in Wroughton, still called Priors Hill, thereby confirm- 
ing this interesting history. 

In 1284, from Vol. 3. of the Calendar of Charter Rolls, we learn 

that the Bishop of Winchester held the advowsons of Elyndon, 

and in 1285 among the manors belonging to the Bishop is included 

Wourfton, spelt Wertona in 1300, wliich certainly refers to the 

same Lower Wroughton. 

Pope Nicholas Taxation^ of A.D. 1293 shows that a pension of £5 
was yearly paid from the Church of Elyndon to the Prior of S. 
Swithin, Winchester ; which pension is thus referred to in the Valor 
Eccl. of Henry VIII. under Elyndon, "Anthony Barker theEector, 
affirmed that he paid to the Abbot fs^c^ of S. [Swithin of Winchester, 
for a yearly pension £5." 



1 Pope Nicholas' Taxation, A.D. 1293. 




Taxatio bonorum spiritualium Archi'natuumBerk' et Wiltes 




taxatio 


Decima 


Ecclesia de Ehndone 33. 6. 8 


3. 6. 


8 


Pensio Prioris Sancta Swithin in eadem 2. 0. 


0. 10. 





Pensio Monachorum de Briaco in eadem 2. 0. 


0, 4. 





Vicaria in eadem 4. 6. 8 


0. 8; 


8 


Taxatio bonorum temporalium Arcliidiaconatum Berk et Wiltes 




Elyndone Abbas Teukesbur' 10. 0. 10 


1. 0. 


1 


IN ether werston Prior Wynton' 23. 3. 4 


2. 6. 


4 


Wykelescote Abbattissa de Lacock 2. 10. 


0. 5. 





Quedhampton Prior de Wottone in 0. 10. 






Bradenstok 


0. 1. 






By Thereza Story Maskdyne. 405 

This brings us down to the time of the dissohition of the monas- 
teries, after which time, in May, 1540, Henry VIII. granted back 
to the Prior (sic) of Winchester, the manor of Netlier Werston 
" in free ahiis." 

It is curious that the Dean, as lie then was, should still be called 
the Prior in this document, but such is the force of liabit ! When 
it is said that the king gave the convents' property to the newly- 
formed Dean and Chapter in " free alms," it means according to 
Cowell " That the receivers are bound only to serve God, and the 
givers are not to claim any terrestrial service." 

In later years this Winchester land, having been let on lives Ijy 
the Dean and Chapter, finally became the property of the late 
Mr. William Codrington, to whose descendants it now belongs ; and 
consequently it seems almost certain that it must be the same 
land as that described in the ancient Land Limit Charter {CD. 
1184) of the year 956 A.D., already alluded to, and that in 
following the boundaries of that part of Mr. Codrington's property 
we are following the old land limits of Ellendune. 

The Ancient Land Limits of Ellendune. 

The land limits of Ellendune are to be found in Codex Dipl. 
1184 — 956 A.D. It is impossible to make out all the points 
mentioned in this account; but some of the places named help to 
make it quite clear that the land described was in the neighbour- 
hood of the old hill fort of Ellendune. 

The following translation, which was sent to me by the Pev. 

C. Taylor, is only approximate, as many of the old Anglo-Saxon 

W(jrds are diilicult to make out and authorities diiler as to their 

meaning. 

" These are the Land Boundaries of Ellendune." 
A.D. 9r)6. C.Z>. 1184. 

"First from thr heathen burial ])lace and along the way to Cressconibe* ; 
thence to the cow i)asture ; from the cow ])asture- to the llidgeway ; from 
the Kidgeway to l^alhere's hnrying place, thence and alonj? the ditch to 
lliiwkthorn, from tlic tliorn to the broad stone, thence to the clover iiicr'-,* 
from the mere to llulmesthorn." ' 



'Carscumbae? Cresscombe? '^ Maedena Cova? Cow pasture? 

^ (^la^faM'inare ? Clover mere ? Mlelmesthorii ? jirohahly Hole:::h'd 



thoni — hollv thor 



406 Notes on the History of Wroughton. 

" From the thorn to the brook, thence to the Elder stumps, from the 
Stumps to the Church highway, thence to Rhudwylle, from Khudwylle to 
Hrysanbeorge, from the barrow to Cold barrow, from the barrow and along 
the way to the Stone, from the Stone again to the heathen burial place." 

It would be of very great interest if the first point,- " The heathen 
burial place," could be found. The Mercians who fought and were 
defeated at the battle of Ellendune were probably heathen in 823, 
when the battle was fought ; and before 956, when this " Land 
Limit " was written, the heathen Danes had overrun a great part 
of this country, leaving traces of settlements in such names as 
Burderop and Salthorpe (both ending in " thorp " — which means a 
village). There is, however, no known tumulus, or grave, which 
could be attributed to them near Ellendune. The second point in 
the land limit may be translated Cresscombe, and may possibly be 
the place where watercress still grows in the warmer water coming 
out from under the hill, in Markham or Marcombe Bottom, When 
we come to the Eidgeway, however, we are on surer ground ; we 
know where that is, and by knowing where the Eidgeway crosses 
the old Winchester property we can make it our more definite 
starting-point in both directions, 

^Rext to the Eidgeway we come to Ealhere's grave, which is 
probably one of the large tumuli close to the Eidgeway. 

Perhaps one of the most interesting of the points described is 
the " Church highway," showing the existence of a Church here at 
that remote date. 

The Battle of Ellendune, 

The story of this battle is told in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 
the year 823 A.D. The Winchester Annals given in Dugdale also 
tell the story of the battle ; from them we gather that there was 
a " challenge and the two kings (Egbert of Wessex and Beornwulf 
of Mercia) chose the time and place." " Beornwulf deriding the 
ambition of Egbert was the first to try whether the taught or the 
untaught does the better when the game is played with the dice 
of Mars." "Egbert's lords being consulted thought it more 
honourable to have their heads cut off, than to lay their free 
necks beneath the yoke. The time pleased them in the summer. 



By TJiereza Story Maskelyne. 407 

the place at Elleiidune, now a manor of the Prior of Winton." ^ 
Beornwulf is said to liave liad thousands to Egbert's Imndreds, Ijut 
his defeat was complete. " Egbert's men, pale and lean, lieorn- 
wulf's well-fed and ruddy, but inexperienced and rash." " When 
]3eornwolf lied he would not for three pence have lost his spurs!" 

It was then that, in the words of an unknown and long-forgotten 
West Saxon poet, "The Ijrook of Ellendune ran red with gore, it 
was choked with slain, and became foul with the carnage." 

This scrap comes as a quotation in Henry of Huntingdon, but, 
as Prof. Oman remarks, "it clearly represents an old poem."- 

Wheri thinkini^ of this decisive battle it becomes interesting to 
conjecture by what roads the Mercians could have arrived, and the 
answer is not far to seek when we take the nature of the country 
into consideration. The Thames, which flows along the valley ten 
n)iles north of Ellendune, was the frontier between Mercia and 
Wessex. In days when there were but few roads by which an 
army could traverse country largely overgrown by forests such as 
J3raden, covering a large district N.W. of this spot, and preventing 
any approach through them, the Poman road from Cirencester cross- 
ing the Thames at Cricklade would almost certainly have been that 
along which the Mercians would come; thus avoiding the undrained 
thickets of Braden. It seems to have been the only way of approach 
to the spot wlieie the battle was probably fought. 

Where the river or brook of Ellendune was is another question. 
Tiieie is no river in this neighbourhood excepting a small one 
called the Pey, which joins the Thames near Cricklade ; but in 
former days the waters that are now collected at the WrougliLun 
Waterworks and the stream rising in Markham bottom (Marcomlje) 
were ])robably good streams, and together fijrmed a larger river 
than the Pey is at ])resent, and we know that when Domesday 
Book was compiled there was enough water to turn the seven mills 
of Ellendune reeonled in IhaL book. 

If it was the river Pey that " ran red with blood ' after the 
battle of Ellendune, we know that the l)attle must have been fought 

' Dupfdale's Winchester Annals ? 

- Oman's JlUtnyij uf Kmjlnnd, ^wj^v [V,)-l. 
\i«l.. XXXVll. — NO. CXVll. *J L 



408 Notes on the History of Wroughton. 

in the valley somewhere to the east below Wroughton where the 
Eey still flows on its way to join the Thames. 

Wertune. 

Wertune was the name by which the manor of Overton or Upper 
Wroughton was known in the Domesday entry. It was then held 
by Humphry de L'Isle and consisted of ten hides of land and one 
mill. In the twelfth century this manor was granted to the 
Abbot of Tewkesbury by Reginald de Dunstanville, of Castle 
Combe, who had married Adeliza de Insula, the daughter and 
heiress of Humphrey de L'Isle. 

The history of Castle Combe from 1216 down to the dissolution 
of the monasteries shows that the Abbot of Tewkesbury held one 
knight's fee of the Dunstanville family during that time' which 
is recorded as worth £10 in 1338 A.D. 

The name of the manor was spelt in many ways in this Castle 
Combe history : — Werston, Worston, Wer'werston, Over Werston ;, 
Uvere Wereston in 1272 A.D. in Testa de Neville; and Over 
Worston in Assize Roll (1001) in 1281 A.D. 

The Calendar Charter Bolls gives other variants of the name, such 
as "Wourfton," as one of the manors belonging to the Bishop of 
Winchester in 1285, " Wertona " in 1300, and " Wrfton " in a grant 
of free warren in their demesne lands to the Prior and Convent of 
St. Swithin, Winchester. 

These varied forms of spelling resulted in the modern form 
" Wroughton " which first appears about the time of Henry YII. 

After the dissolution of Tewkesbury Abbey, Over Wroughton or 
Overton, was bestowed by Henry VIII.^ as a "Grant to William 
Rycheman alias Webbe of site and chief . . . messuage of the manor 
of Over Wroughton Wilts, and two messuages and tenements called 
Turneys and Uffcote in Over Wroughton wbich belonged to the late 
Monastery of St. Mary Tewkesburye, Gloucester." 

The family name of "Wroughton" seems to have been originally 
spelt much in the same way as was that of the village ; but though 
the Wroughton family lived for over two hundred years at Broad 
Hinton, their only recorded connection with Wroughton village 

^ Letters and Papers of Henry VIII., May, 1540. 



By Thereza Story Maskelyne. 409 

seems to have been when George and Alice Wroughton^ came to 
live at Overton in 1565, after the dissolution of the monasteries. 

Elcombe. 

The History of Elcombe is of especial interest in helping to 
explain several points in the history of Wroughton. 

Without a knowledge of the family of the Lovels of Elcombe it 
would be impossible to understand the meaning of the pension 
which is mentioned in Pope Nicholas' Taxation,'^ as paid for many 
years by Elyndon Church to Minster Lovel. And without knowing 
that the important family of Lovel were connected with Ivry in 
the north of France and that they originally bore the name "cZe 
Ivry'' we should have no clue to the meaning of a portion of their 
ancient estate whicli still goes by the name of "The Ivery," 

It has been said, and indeed it is only too true, that " writers on 
place-names sometimes give little consideration to anything else 
than the form of the name, instead of giving due weight also to 
the history and circumstances of the place to which the name 
applies," and it would be idle to speculate on the meaning of this 
name of Ivery, without a knowledge of the land and of its former 
owners. It was once suggested that as the old Anglo-Saxon word 
Vlera" (meaning over, or higlier) applied to this high land, it 
might account for the name. The answer to this is that Upper 
Wroughton was the historical name of quite another part of the 
village, i.e., Over Worton, now Overton. 

Another conjecture was that the name " The Ivery " was derived 
from an old Frencli word " iverie " (which means a place for 
bleeding horses) because Wroughton is a place where racers are 
now trained 1 This absurd suggestion was, however,soon withdrawn." 

'The Ivery" is in fact a pasture surroundcnl by LJie ancient 
ramparts and ditches, now much obliterated, of EUendune, the 

^ Aubrey and Jackson Wiltshire Collections, 368. 

* l^opc Niclioltis' Taxation is t,qv('ii at i>a.!<e 404. 

''Tilt' tonus of llu' word Uriaco, II)rfi(>, or Ivry >ho\v uk- that the piact^ 

uanu' * Thi' Jrery ' cannot l)i" dcrivfil tiom ' in ric ' a stud farm, l>ut is simply 

the French form of the old llomano C'l-ltic ((Jaulish) name o\ £''ri>icuin or 

Briacuni.'' The Kcv. A. L. Mayhrw, Oxford. 

'2 I. '2 



410 Notes on the History of Wroughton. 

Dun, or hill fort of Ella, which also includes the Church, church- 
yard, Vicarage, boys' school, and Wroughton House and grounds, 
and is situated on an outlying spur of the lower chalk downs 
overlooking Elcombe and the valley of the Thames. 

The history of the manor of Elcombe, of which this land formed 
a part, shows that it belonged for two hundred years to the family 
of the Lovels of Ivry, from the time of the marriage of John Lovel 
with Aliva Basset, daughter and heiress of Alan Lord Basset ; so 
that there is a good reason for attributing the derivation of " The 
Ivery " to the name of its ancient owners. 

The history of the Lovel family is found in Collins' Peerage, 
vol. III., and also in a rare volume called A genealogical history 
of the house of Yvery in its different "branches of Yvery, Luvel, 
Fercival, and Gourney, hy Anderson. London : 'printed for H. Wood.- 
falljun., 1742, a copy of which exists at Longleat ; another copy 
presented by Queen Caroline is at the Bodlean Library. 

The family is said to have descended from the Barons of Ivery 
in Normandy, taking the name Luvel in the twelfth century. 

The first Lovel of especial interest to us as a Wiltshire landowner 
was John^ a minor at his father's death, who was placed in the 
custody of Alan Lord Bassett, the great landowner, whose name 
is commemorated in so many places in Wiltshire. John Lovel 
married Lord Basset's daughter and heiress Aliva, and thus became 
possessed of his large Wiltshire estates, and he dowered her^ with 
his Oxfordshire manor of Minster Lovel. 

It was this man's grandmother Maud, wife of William Lovel, who 
had granted a charter and presentation of the Church of Minster 
to the " Abbot and Monks of Ivry in perpetual Alms " ; " one half 
of the profits of the Church of Minster being appropriated to the 
Convent of Ivry ; the other moiety being the endowment of the 
parochial priest." 

John, the second Lord Lovel, was Sheriff of Hunts and Cam- 
bridge in 1261 ; Governor of Northampton Castle in 1264, and of 

^ His father, William Luvel de Ivery, was one of the Barons at King 
John's coronation, 1199 A.D. 
^ See also Rennet's Parochial Antiquities^ IV and 18 John, 1 Hen. III. 



By Thereza Story Maskelyne. 411 

Marlborough, 1272; and following the example of his ancestor 
Maud, and that of his relation, Philip Basset, he gave his lands of 
Chadendon (in Lydiard Tregoze parisli) "in 'pure alms to God and 
the blessed Mary of Stanley and the monks there, for the safety 
of his own soul and that of Maud of Sydenham his wife, and those 
of his father and mother, and Alan Basset and Alice his wife, and 
of all his predecessors and successors." 

He died 15 Edward I. (1287)^ seized of the manors of Minster 
Level Co. Oxon ; Elcombe, Salthorpe, etc., in Wiltshire, and other 
estates in England. 

Very soon after this date we find the first mention of the 
" Capella Elecomhe in iparoch cU Elyndon," dedicated to S. Mary, of 
which his son John the third Lord Level (Miles) was the first 
patron in 1308, and Eoger Grymbaud, was the "Clericus."^ 

From the Inquisitioncs post mortem we may infer that the second 
Lord Level lived at Elcombe and probably built the chapel. The 
LP.M. describes 

"the Capital Messuage with the Garden, worth 13^ 4'\ with 140 acres of 
arable land, price of acre 4d. sum 46*. 8'\ Also 16 acres of meadow, price of 
the acre 12''. sum 16'. There is there pasture in Common for 50 oxen, price 
per head 4'^., sum 16'. 8''. There is a several pasture in Blagrove worth by 
the year 16^ 8''. There is a Windmill and it is worth 6'. 8'^ per annum. 
The rent of the free men by the year is 10'. l'\ at the four principal terms 
of the year by equal proportions. Also lib, of Cummin at the feast of St. 
Michael price Id. The Rent of the Customars and nineteen cottars who 
hold thirteen virgates of land is 23s. by the year. The rent of the hens is by 
the year 8". 4'\ The pannage of the pigs is 6d. The rent of eggs at Easter 4d. 
the work and customs of the said (Justomars are worth by the year £9. 6. 0." 

The value of the property seems to have increased before the 
deiUh of the third Lord Level, in 1310, as it was then valued at 
£15 13.S. 9r?., and there were twenty-seven customars at Elcombe 
each of whom each paid 5s., and did some work iov the lord. 

Tho last-mentioned palion dt' iho cliapol was •" William Luvel, 
Alil-s. I)..iiiiiius Lovell et Holhiiid." in 1448 A. D. Of this ancient 
' ii.iju'l ilic t'oumlalions alone can now Ik^ Irat'cil, but a small font 
pii'vcrxcd ill W^Mii^litdji ('liutcli is suppnsiMl (n lia\'o belonged to 

' Wilts Inquisitiones post mortem^ Hen. IIL. tkc, p. 168. 

' Sir Thomas Phillips' IIV^/s fns(i(i(ti"),s. 



412 Notes on the History of Wroughton, 

it, as are also a few pieces of carved stone which can still be seen 
at Elcombe Hall. 

After the year 1448 we hear nothing more of the chapel, and 
but little more of the Lovels, owing probably to the Civil Wars of 
the Koses, and the disturbed state of the country. 

Francis, the eleventh and last Lord Lovel, who had been a fol- 
lower of Eichard III., and who fought for him at Bosworth Field, 
was certainly not more loved than was his royal master, as is shown 
by the political skit, 

"The Cat, the Eat, and Lovel the Dog 
Euled all England under the Hogg," 

which rhyme is said by Aubrey^ to have been made by a Wiltshire- 
man named Collingbourne, who owned land at one time at 
Quidhampton near Wroughton, and who also got into trouble in 
those days and forfeited his lands. 

Lovel ^ escaped from the battle of Bosworth Field, where King 
Eichard was killed; but having joined Lambert Simnel and 
fled after the battle of Stoke in Northampton, he was never seen 
alive again. The story has been told of his skeleton being found, 
some two hundred years later, by workmen in the cellar of his 
house at Minster Lovel, but, though this story is probably 
unfounded, without doubt his lands were confiscated to the 
Crown on his attainder, when Elcombe, Salthrop, and the other 
Wiltshire possessions, were granted by Henry VIII. in 1515 to 
Sir William Compton, and finally sold by his grandson to Thomas 
Sutton, the founder of the Charterhouse, in London. 

Sutton who had already acquired the ancient buildings and land, 
which, till the dissolution of the monasteries, had belonged to the 
monks of the Charter House in London, endowed his new hospital 
with the whole of his Wiltshire property in 1611 ; and thus 
as was said by the Lord Cliief Justice of that day : — " The 
Soile which in ancient time was given by Sir Walter de Manny, a 
Knight and a Soldier, for the Sepulture of Poor men when they 
were dead, is now by Thomas Sutton, an Esquire and a soldier, 
converted and consecrated to the sustenance of the poor and im- 
potent while they live." 
1 Aubrey & Jackson, Wilts Coll., p. 248. ^ Craik & Macfarlane, Vol. III., 290. 



By Tlureza Story Maskdyne. 413 

The land thus given in charity is described in the deed founding 
the hospital in Charterhouse as: — ''all those his Manors of Elcombe, 
Salthrop, Chilton, J>lagrove, Mihenden, Wiglescote, Westcote, and 
Uffcote," etc., all of which excepting Salthro[), still remain in the 
hands of the Governors of Charterhouse.^ 

Salthrop, which had been part of the old Lovel estate for over 
three hundred years, remained part of the Charterhouse property 
from the year 1611 till 1739, when Mr. Thomas Benet, whose 
family had long owned the adjoining property of Costow, made an 
exchange with the Governors of Charterhouse, giving up Costow 
to them in exchange for Salthrop. This was done because "some 
parts of their respective lands did not lie entirely toget])er, but 
were intermixed so that they could not be conveniently occupied 
and maintained ; therefore the said Governors and Thomas Benet 
had mutually agreed to make an exchange.''^ 

A special Act of Parliament had to be passed to enable this 
exchange to be made, a copy of which is kept at Basset Down. 

Long before Mr. Thomas Bennet made this exchange, his family 
were living as tenants at Salthrop, as is shown by the monument 
in Wroughton Church to Sir Thomas Bennet, Master in Chancery, 
who died in 1670 ; and that of his wife, Thomasina, who died at 
Salthrop in 16-15. 

"Eton College Piece," or "Bryan's Acre.'' 
The history of " Eton College Piece," a field in Elcombe Manor, 
may interest some readers, for the history of the Lovels who were 
for two hundred years the owners of the Manor, gives us a clue to 
the histoiy of the field, as well as to the derivation of its name. 
In order to find any connection between the old ownership of this 
field and Eton College, its history has to be traced liaek to the 
time of King dohn, when ]\laud Lovel, having- endowed Min.ster 
Lovel with })art of her property, it became a cell (o the alien jiiiory 
«>f St. Mary d(i Ih'iaco, or Yvri, in her native land. W'r also 
V\\n\\ thai an ancient |)ension was paid by Mlyndcn ('linivh to 
r.riaco, llii-nui^h MinsliM- l,()\-el, fmni lan<l in Mlcombe Manor be- 
longing to the Lovels. 

> inn Lttttn^ I\itnit—Z:\mo'> \. 



414 Notes on the History of Wroughton. 

This we know from the following sources : — 

From a note to " Ministers' accounts imder Possessions of Alien 
Priories" we learn that a pension was being paid in 1127 by 
Elyndon Church to "Minster Lovel a cell of Ivry Abbey." 

From Pope Nicholas Taxatio in 1293 we know that the Prior of 
Minster Lovel received " de pensione monachorum de Briaco in 
Ecclesia de Elyndone in decanatu Crek. 1. 0. 0." — being half of 
original pension of £2.^ 

Tanner, in " Notitia Monastica," states, under Minster Lovel 
Alien Priory, " The Church of this place being given to the Abbey 
of St. Mary de Ibreio or Yvri by Maud the wife of William Lovel,, 
before 8 Johannis, it became an alien priory of Benedictine Monks, 
cell to that foreign monastery, which after the suppression of these 
houses was granted to Eaton (sic) College 1 Ed. lY." 

This brings us down to the time of the foundation of Eton College, 
which was endowed by Henry VI. in 1440 with money obtained 
by the suppression of alien houses, and which, as we see above, was 
benefitted by the suppression of Minster Lovel as a cell of Ivry in 
1461 (1 Edward IV.). Knowing this, it is interesting to find that 
the Governors of Eton College held leases going back to Queen 
Elizabeth's reign, from 27th October, 1560, down to 1796, of land 
called in every lease " Bryan s Acre," or Bryan s tithes," Since 
1796, however, all reference to the property has disappeared from 
the college books,^ and from this time forward it is included in the 
Charterhouse property. 

^ Pope Nicholas Taxatio, A.D. 1293. See note to p. 404 above. 

^ Letter from H. B. Dyke, Clerk to the Governing Body of Eton College 
" March 14th, 1904. 

" The only deeds I can find (on the Elcombe portion of the property) 
consist of a series of counterpart Leases going back to Queen Elizabeth's 
reign, the most recent being that of 1796. ... In all the Leases 
the property is described as follows : — All that their portion of tithes 
called Bryan's Acre, otherwise Bryan s Tithes, to be gathered in the 
fields of Elcombe . . . 

"I can find no reference to anything after the year 1796, and no 
receipts are entered in the account book of the College after the year 
1799 — in fact all reference to the property disappears ..." 



By Thcreza Story Maskelyne. 415- 

The land in question is marked ''Eton Colltrjc" on an old map 
of Elcombe Manor, which is kept in the Church chest of Wrough- 
ton, and on the later Charterhouse map ''Eton piece now Charter- 
house." 

Another fact pointing to th(i identity of '' Bryan s Acre'' 
with ''Eton Colleye Piece/' is seen in tlie Act of Parliament for 
dividing Common fields in 1799 A.D., from which we learn " that 
the Provost and College of Eton are entitled to a portion of the 
titiies on Bryants Acre (or Bryan s tithe), held by Anthony Bathe 
by virtue of a lease for years under the said Provost and College." 
In this Act of Parliament certain "ancient compositions'' are 
alluded to, which were not clearly understood by the liector 
and his lessee,^ but which may refer to the ancient pension 

ELCOMBE COUNTERPART LEASES. 

27th Oct. 1560 to Thomas Wylde of Elcombe Husbandman 

20tli April 1603 Edmund Maskelyne of Pirton Gentleman 

28tli May 1621 Anthony Bethwin of Winchester Yeoman 

20tli July 1636 Thomas Coleman of Wroughton Husbandman 

ir)th Dec. 1652 Thomas Coleman 
16th May 1754 John Herring of Elcombe 
17tli April 1760 Matthias Herring of Elcombe 

6th April 1765 William Hill of Wroughton 

16th Feb. 1769 Wilham Hill 

16th Dec. 1780 Anthony ]]atlie of Elcombe Gentleman 

20th Dec. 1792 Anthony Jkthe 

20th Dec. 1796 Anthony Bathe 

' 36 Geo. III., ca}). 7. Act for dividing, alloting, and inclosing certain 
. . . common fields etc. ... in the manor of Elcombe. "That 
Edmund Ferrers Clerk is Rector of Wroughton and as such entitled to the 
(iveat Tithes . . .or to certain Moduses or Compositions in Huu 
thereof (except to the tithes of certain lands in sd. manor and i)ari.sh 
called Bryiiiis Acrc)^ il'c." " Tliat the Provost of the College Royal of the 
lUessed Virgin Mary of Eton . . . are entitled to a ])ortion of tithes of 
tliat ])art of the Arable and Meadow or pasture land in sd. niandiand pari>h 
called Aryans' Anr and Anthony Bathe gentleman holds .said portion i)y 
viituc of a Icasi; under sd. Provost," &,c. The Comm. are to make an 
allotment to tiie Provost, ttc. ... or to Anthony lUthe their lessee in 
Vwn of the ])ortion of tithes of sd. lands calltMl /Jrydii^s Acer . . . Tlio 
Connnissioners are to hear and settle a claim of the (Jovernors of Charter- 
house to exi'mi)tii'n trom Tithes in kind lor jtart of the open and Connnon 
Fields and for Certain I lulosures in that part of the Manor situate in the 
parisli of Wnin-liton, in payment of certain Modusi-s or Ancient Com- 
positions. 



416 Notes on the History of Wroiighton. 

paid to Briaco from 1127 down to the 15th century, which 
only ceased on the dissolution of the Alien Houses, when Eton 
College was founded. It would be. to say the least, a curious 
coincidence if the old Elyndon pension to Briaco could thus be 
finally traced to the tithe on " Bryan's Acre " of the Eton College 
leases. 

Canon Jackson (in a note to page 369 Aubrey and Jackson, 
Wiltshire Collections) says that "some rents that had belonged to 
a Priory, belonged in 1535 to Eton College," and the fact of this 
date being twenty-five years earlier than that of the first Eton 
College lease is of great interest. 

One other fact, though unexplained, is worth recording. 

It will be remembered ^ that at the time when Henry the 
Eighth's Valor Eccl. was made, the Eector of Elyndon was still 
paying the old due of £5 to Winchester, and a new payment is 
recorded of 26s, M. to St. rrideswides,^ in Oxford, whilst the old 
pension to Briaco is not mentioned at all. But this clearly is a 
mistake, because the St. Frideswide Cartulary, as printed, contains 
no mention of Elyndon, and as this monastery had property at 
Edington, or Edinton, a hamlet of Hungerford, it is possible that 
the two names were then confused, or misspelt. 



^ Valor Ucclesiasticus, Henry VIII. Elyndon. Anth. Barker Rector 

affirms value to be total £3V 18 8 

Out of this lie pays to Abbot fsic) Winton ... 5 

" et solut' Collegio Sancti Frieswid' in Oxon' for yearly 

pension 16 8 

2 St. Frideswide was suppressed in 1529 by Wolsey to found and endow 
his new cardinal college of Christ Church, Oxford. 



417 



NOTES ON THE CHURCHES OF ASHLEY, J^EKWICK 

JUSSETT, CLYFFE rYPAIlI), COMPTON F>ASSETT, 

HILMAKTON, LYDIARD TKFGOZE, WINTERP>OUKNE 

BASSETT, AND WINTEJIIU)URNE MONKTON.^ 

J'.y C. E. PoNTiNO, F.S.A. 

The Church of S. James, Ashley. 

The plan consists of cliancel, with modei'ii vcHlry on the soiuh, 
nave with three-bay south aisle, south porch, and western tower. 

Tliis Church has very striking features of early work of two 
periods. Of the Norman Church there remain the south doorway 
of the aisle and the chancel arch — Ijoth very masculine in character 
and of a period shortly after 1100. The doorway has a square 
opening with lintel and tympanum contained within an unmoulded 
semi-circular arch. Outside of this is a roll mould supported on 
shafts with cushion caps. The lintel and upper part of the tym- 
})anum are ornamented with a star pattern diaper and the lower 
part of the tympanum with semi-circles, or scales (Plate L). The 
chancel arch isasemi-cii'cle of one order, without label, both arch 
and jambs having square unmoulded edges, with an impost 8^-in. 
dee]) ; this latter is a square course chamfered on the under edge, 
the Hat vertical face, on the west side and reveals only, having a 
Ijand of stars cut on it. 

'J'he south aisle is extremely narrcjw — only Hft. 2in. wide from 
the shafts of the arcade to tl)e wall wliich, even if the south d<'(ir- 
way did not exist, woukl ])oint to its being on earlier foundations, 
it ai)pears to have been re-l)uilt at al)out 1200 — 1220 rather than 
added at this time. 

' For kind permission to reproduce the photographs illustrating this paper 

'he Ivlitor is iiidc^icd to ]\Iiss Walker, of Tethury, for two pliotograjihs of 
Ashley Church ; to Messrs. Tompkins ct Harrett, of Swindon, for two of 
( 'ly tie Pyi)ard ; to Mr. J. C. Hood, of Swindon, for four of Lydiard Tregoze ; 
and to Mr. Davison, of Swindon, for tour of Wintorbonrne Hassett and 
\\'interl)ourne Monktoii. Six of tin' i>li(»ti)xniiilis of Clyth' were taken by 
the llev. P). \V. liradfonl. Part of the expen.se of the ilhistrations of ClytVe 
ryj)artl and Winterbonrne IJassett has l)een borne by the llev. K. H. (Joddard 
ind the llev. H. (J. (). Kenchdl. For the loan of two l)lueks in the text tlie 
i'Mitor is indebted to the kindness of Mr. H. Heath, of Calne. 



418 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berivick Bassett, etc. 

Outside there is a buttress of this period westward of the porch. 
The aisle is divided from the nave by an arcade of three bays of 
arches of two orders — the outer chamfered and the inner moulded 
— with moulded labels ; these are supported on piers having four 
clustered shafts and carved capitals. The bases are apparently 
buried under the new tiled floor laid at a higher level. The eastern 
bay of the three is wider and an earlier semi-circular arch, re-set^ 
is carried across from the pier to the south wall. A later arch is 
carried in like manner from the other pier. The outer wall of the 
eastern bay was re-built wider with a new window, and gabled as 
a transept, probably in the fourteenth century, and the gable cross 
looks old. The western bay has a two-light square-headed Per- 
pendicular window. 

The north wall of the nave has been re-built with two two-light 
windows. The ceiling is a plastered barrel vault, and probably 
conceals an old braced-rafter roof. There are two corbels in the 
south wall under this, near the east end.- 

The porch retains an outer arch of the fourteenth century. 

The tower is a square embattled structure covered with ivy ; 
sufficient can be seen to show that the upper stage is of the 
fifteenth century. The arch opening into the nave is of early 
fourteenth century character — a pointed arch of two orders of 
chamfers, the inner dying on to the jambs and the outer chamfer 
carried down : the west window of the tower is of the same type, 
two-lights with ogee heads. 

The font is somewhat unusual ; a circular bowl with mouldings 
of fourteenth century type, on modern base and plinth. 

The chancel was re-built in 1858, and the only part of the old 
work preserved is a peculiar piscina of the fourteenth century. It 
is detached from the wall and consists of a semi-octagonal bowl 
and shaft supported by a corbel-head, the latter presenting the 
unusual feature of a corbel standing on the floor. The question 
has naturally been raised whether this was ever used for another 
purpose (Plate II.). 

The windows contain some rather modern-looking medallions of 
Flemish glass representing events in the life of our Lord. 



By C. E. Pouting, FXA. 419 

The Chukcii of S. Nicholas, ]]ekavick Bassett. 

The Cliurcli consists of nave with tower forniiiig south porch 
and chancel with vestry on the north. 

Tiie nave is the only pre-lieformation structural v^ork here; 
this dates from late in the fourteenth century, as judged by the 
doorv^ays on north and south, with tlieir deep labels moulded l;ack 
to the face of the head and the four tall two-light square-headed 
windows, without labels, in the side walls. The west window, a 
pointed one of three lights, appears to have been inserted some 
seventy years later. In the south wall is a trefoil-arched ])iscina 
with circular bowl. The only buttress is one on the south to 
support the chancel arch, which is modern. Across this arch is a 
fifteenth century oak screen of five bays each side of the central 
opening, the mullions being small buttresses in the lower part, with 
carved finials, the central opening has a four-centred arch with 
floriated cusps and carved spandrels ; in the cornice is one band 
of inserted carving with a band of XXXX ornament below and the 
old cresting above. The rood-loft has disappeared (Plate III.). 

Tiie font is a most interesting one of the latter half of the 
thirteenth century ; it is octagonal with shafts at the angles, and 
each side has a trefoil arch with carved floriated cusps, and the 
unusual feature of foliage branching out at the springing above 
the caps of the shafts. It is badly broken by the iron hinges and 
staple. 

In the floor of the chancel is the brass of William Bayley, who 
died in 1427.^ 

The chancel and the tower-porch are built of thin bricks, and 
probably date from early in the eighteenth century ; the former 
has an east window of triple-lancet form, and two lancets in the 
south wall, all of wliich are coeval with the I)rickwork. 

Tiie vestry was aJdiul under thr diicrlioii (•!' Mr. T. II. A\'yalt. 



Adjoining the church}ard i.s an inleresling spceinii'n of the 
manor house of the fifteenth century, the whole I'cing old wiih 
the exception of tli(^ brick addition at the south-west angle, although 
some alteration has taken ])la((' in the south })rojoction. 
» Kite's " nra^ses of Wiltshirt," p. 22. 



420 Notes on the Cliurclies of Ashley, Berivick Bassett, etc. 

The plan is a parallellogram running east and west divided hj 
a cross passage with a door at each end. On the west of this 
passage, and divided from it by a solid-framed oak screen (moulded 
on the west side and chamfered on the other) is the hall with 
fireplace and chimney in the west gable and a two-light north 
window, also another by the side of the fireplace, and the south 
window has been superseded by the modern addition. On the 
other side of the passage is a solid division wall, and beyond it the 
kitchen. All this part has the original roof. The entrance to the 
hall inside the south porch, the stone doorway of which remained 
until a few years ago, now forms the entrance to the old house at 
Vasterne, Wootton Bassett. The doorway at the north end of the 
passage leading out into the churchyard, as well as that in the 
south porch, still remains. 

On the south is a two-gabled projection, one part forming the 
two-storied porch, with its stone doorway preserved, and the other 
part the stair ; on the north side opposite the stair is a projection, 
probably the buttery, with overhung half-timber framing to the 
room over. The whole of the kitchen has half-timber work to the 
upper storey, and the main posts are conspicuous features in the 
rooms, but the hall (which is now divided into two storeys) had 
the stone walls carried up to the roof. 

Part of the timber framing has been covered with rough-cast, 
and part with tile-hanging. 

This house does not appear to have been favoured by the lord 
of the manor in later times, for a larger house of the Jacobean 
period has been built some distance to the south-east of it, nearer 
the road. Here the walls of one room were covered with painted 
canvas, said to have been done by a Dutch prisoner ; but this also 
went to adorn the dining-room of the house at Vasterne. 

Sir Stephen Glynne's notes on this Church, made 29th April, 

1850, are as follows:- — ^ 

' In St. Deiniol's Library, Hawarden, are preserved the MS. notes made 
by Sir Stephen Glynne, cir. 1850, on a great number of Churches throughout 
England, including one hundred and ten in Wiltshire. Of these last, by 
the kindness of the Warden, Canon Joyce, the Society has been enabled to 
procure copies. The notes dealing with the Churches described by Mr.. 
Ponting in this paper are here printed within brackets. — Ed. 



By C. E. Pontiny, KS.A. 421 

[Bervjick Basset. S. Nicolas. A very small Churcli, a chapelry 
to Calne, situated in a rustic hamlet and having a honiely but not 
unpleasing appearance. It consists of a nave and chancel, of 
unequal heights, with a small steeple on the south, which forms a 
porch, and which is boarded in its upper part. The nave is of flint 
stone, the chancel of brick — the roof of the former covered with 
stone tiles. There is no chancel arch, l)ut this seems to have been 
destroyed in the re-construction of the chancel, which probably took 
place after the Ee formation. Yet there are the original early windows 
built into its walls. The east window a triple lancet, that on the 
north-west a single trefoil-headed lancet, on the south-west a plain 
lancet. The rood loft with its screen remains. The latter is rather 
plain, with ogee central doorway and cornices — the under side of 
the loft is panelled, and the whole has traces of faded colours. 
The windows of the nave are late and square-headed of two lights 
except the western, which is of three and pointed — and on the 
north a single square-headed light cinquefoiled. The north door 
is pointed with a hood, and may be early. There is a trefoiled 
niche in the south wall at the east of the nave. There are some 
plain old benches with square-headed ends. Tlie font is First P. 
and good — the bowl octagonal, each face having a trefoil-headed 
arch springing from shafts with early foliage. Tlie stem octagonal.] 



The Chukch of S. Peter, Clyffe Pypard. 

Plan— cluuicei with vestry on north, nave with north and t^outh 
aisles, the latter having the east end screened off as chapels, south 
porch, and western tower. 

The ancient parts of tin's Church consist of llio tnwor, nave and 
aisles, and pcnch, all of wliicli are the woi-lv of {\\o latter half <>f 
the fifteenth century — the tower, ])r()hal>ly, ha\iiiu- Ikmmi aiMtMl to 
an earli(U' iia\-e ami llie re-huildin-' of the remainder folhtwin^- 
cluscdy upon it ; tlu^ weather mould on the t\isl face of the tower, 
Rome Gfl. ahoN'e thi^ riduv of the iia\(> roof su-^esis t hat it was 
inttMidtid to put a roof uf higher pitch than t hat erected. The 
chaneel was I'e-huilt and the veslrv added in lvSGt» hv the lale 



422 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berivick Bassett, etc. 

squire, Mr. H. X. Goddard, and the reniaiiider of the Church re- 
stored in 1874, Mr. Butterfield being the architect for both works.^ 

The tower is of three stages divided by string-courses which, 
with the cornice, base mould, and plinth, are more pronounced than 
is the local type; there are diagonal buttresses at the angles, 
carried to the top and terminated by pinnacles. The tops of these 
latter were re-built in 1874,^ the stair turret on the south is carried 
up to the first string-course rectangular in plan, on the east 
side, above this the projection is octagonal and is so continued 
above the tower. Both this and the tower have embattled 
parapets. The west window of the lower stage is a three-light 
pointed one with outside label having square returns; below it 
is a four-centred doorway with similar label, and above a good 
two-light pointed labelled window in the middle stage, the tracery 
lights of which are blind. The belfry has four two-light pointed 
windows which are without labels (Plate Y.). The west end of 
the south aisle and its buttress have similar plinth and base 
mould to the tower, and were probably built as part of it, but 
have been widened out at the top in modern times. 

The walls of the north and south aisles are symmetrical, and 
alike, and have similar base moulds which do not, however, range 

^ A wooden model of the Church now preserved at the manor, was made 
(? by the Rev. Francis Goddard) before the re-building of the chancel (? 1840 
—1850). The windows and details are carefully and to all appearance 
accurately given. The chancel shows two two-light square-headed windows 
on the south side occupying the positions of the existing windows, with a 
priest's door between them, which no longer exists. On the north side one 
similar window appears in the centre of the wall, in the position of the 
present vestry door to the west of the existing window. There was no 
vestry. The model shows the east window^ as a good four-light Perpendicular 
window with many lights in the head, but whether such a window really 
existed m stone at the time of the re-building, and was removed by Mr. 
Butterfield in order to insert the present three-light window of poor late 
thirteenth century character, seems very doubtful. It is more probable 
that the wooden frame of a four-light window of "Carpenter Perpen- 
dicular," which still exists in the barn of the Home Farm (1912) was the 
window which is improved upon in the model, and was removed by Mr. 
Butterfield.— E. H. Goddakd. 

^ Old drawings of a hundred years earlier show the pinnacles without tops 
to them.— E.H.G. 



By C. E. Pontinrj, F.8.A. 423 

with tfiafc of the tower, but a good deal of re-building has been 
done ill the north wall, only ; each aisle has four three-light pointed 
windows with returned labels and shields, and a four-centred 
doorway in the middle, a buttress comes between each pair of 
windows and a diagonal one at the east angle of each aisle — the 
five bays corresponding with those of the arcades. Tlie latter liave 
lofty octagonal columns with moulded caps and bases, the responds 
being demi-columns, the arches are pointed and of two orders of 
hollows; there is no clerestory. The arches at the ends of the 
nave, opening into chancel and tower respectively, are practically 
alike, and have similar mouldings to the arcades, but in the former 
these are continued down the jambs and stopped on a splayed base. 
(Plate VII.) 

The roofs of the nave and aisles form one continuous span 
on the outside, but inside they are diCferently treated. The 
nave roof is of five bays divided by circular moulded principal 
braces and intermediates, with tie-beams at the former, over the 
columns, having wall shafts and corbels of wood. There are three 
moulded purlins intersecting with the principals, where there are 
carved bases; a moulded and embattled cornice is carried along 
at the level of the v^all-plate. In the aisles each roof is divided 
into nine bays by flat moulded principals which are intersected by 
one purlin. There are braces below the principals on the arcade 
sides, and there is evidence of wall pieces and braces, since removed, 
against the outer walls. 

The south porch^ is a good freestone erection, coeval with the 
aisles, and the same base mould is continued around it; there are 
diagonal buttresses at the angles ; the outer doorway has a four- 
centred moulded arch with label similar to that of the windows. 
The old roof with moulded ril)s and braces is preserved. Over 
th»; north door on the outside is a stone shield of the (loddanl 
arms. 

The rood loft was a[)[)roached by the stair in the north jamb of 
the chancel arch, the upper doorway and a corresponding opening 

' Before the restoration of 1874 the place of tlie present ^able cross was 
occupied liy a tlirer-sidcil sloiu' sundial without ornaiu<nt. 
V()[,. X.X.Wll. — NO. rxvii. - .M 



424 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

through the respond on the south (which seems to indicate a loft 
having continued across the chapels also) still remain, also the two 
corbels which supported the front of the loft. The two openings 
are now occupied by two Elizabethan figures, said to be those of 
John and Elizabeth Goddard, whose monument, in wood, is referred 
to below. The rood screen still exists, and is simple compared 
with the western type. The central opening is square-headed 
and on each side are six narrow bays ; below the middle rail the 
space is occupied by plain boarding, instead of the usual mullions 
and panels. The cornice has one band of vine pattern carving 
and the original cresting remains (Plate XL). The loft existed until 
al)out 1820. On the tie beam over the chancel arch is (apparently) 
the base of the rood \ this beam with the cornice and boarding of 
the east bay of the roof, has been painted and there are traces of 
a coloured floral pattern on the wall above the chancel arch. 

The eastern bays of the aisle are screened off as chapels, the 
screens coming under the arches and across the aisles, each of the 
four screens has an opening with traceried head, the lower part, 
unlike that of the rood screen, having panels. The north now 
contains the organ. The south, known as the Bupton Chapel, 
has a squint into the chancel. The colouring on the screens and 
on the beam in the porch is said to have been reproduced from 
remains of the old colouring at the 1874 restoration. The 
marbling on the arches of the arcades dates probably from the 
eighteenth century. 

In the south porch is a stoup worked on the east jamb of the 
inner doorway ; a moulded beam is fixed across the porch over 
this door and has obviously been worked for its position, in it are 
two round holes as though for pins to secure a rood or some other 
object. On this beam are now placed some fragments of stonework, 
including late Norman and fourteenth century mouldings and a 
fourteenth century head* 

The pulpit with its sounding-board is a fine example of Laudian 
work with excellent carving, it bears the inscription: — "Ex Dono 

^ In Plate VII. this is concealed by the royal arms, which, together with 
the seats shown in that photograph, disappeared in the restoration. — E.H.G. 



By a E. Pouting, RS.A. 425 

Joanis Kingston, Gen. Anno Doi. 1629." On tlie pulpit is a coeval 
gridiron desk with two iron brackets, of very rare type. (Plates 
VII., VIIL, and IX.) 

The font is a copy of the one at Over, Camlnidgeshire, carved 
])y tlie late Canon Francis Goddard, when a young man. In the 
churchyard are the remains of a plain multi-sided font howl of the 
Decorated period, lined with lead. 

In the heads of six of the aisle windows are fragments of the 
original glass. In two windows of tlie north aisle is an interesting 
collection of glass given to the present Vicar by Mr. J. E. 
Nightingale and placed here by the former in 1893. (See des- 
cription in Wilts Arch. Mar/., xxvii., 179.) 

In the outer face of the west wall of the north aisle is built the 
head of a thirteenth century coffin slab, having part of a cross on 
it. Over the north door on the inside is the upper part of the 
cross of a coffin slab of the same period. 

The tower contains a peal of six bells, bearing the following 
inscriptions : — 

1. TIILS BELL WAS PAID FOR BY A SUBSCRIPTION IN THE YEAR 

1825. THE REVD EDWARD GODDARD RECTOR. JAMES 
WELLS ALDBOURN FECIT. 

2. H^' HITCHCOCK & J^ SMITH CHURCHWARDENS. J« WELLS 

ALDBOURN FECIT 1825, 
:]. JOHN HOPKINS & ROGER SPACKMAN CH-WARDENS A.R. 1735- 
4. HARRY HITCHCOCK & JACOB SMITH CHURCH WARDENS. JAMES 

WELLS ALDBOURN WILTS FECIT. 
'). G. MEAPvS FOUNDER LONDON 1859. 
G. PRAYS THE LORD I.W. 1G04, 

There is also a small bell on the top of the tower on which the 
clock strikes, inscribed : — 

i;. WKLI.S. AI.Dr.OUKN. KKCIT 17.S9. 

.\.l)ove the bolls in the l)cll'ry is an oalv wim-li for hoisting the 

hells, bearing the date 159"). 

The following are the ])rincipal nionunn'iils in the Church : — 
111 the w.dl of llic iioiih aisle a recessed loml) with good ogee 

ciMt[uefoil(^d caiio]))', thr cu.-iis having the liead mould, and carved 

'J M L' 



426 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bas^ett, etc. 

crockets on the back of the label. The front of the tomb is arcaded 
with typical work of the middle of the fourteenth century — 
ogee arches with carved crockets and finials ; at each end is a 
flying buttress. Within the recess is a cross-legged figure in 
armour, with his head on a helmet and his feet on a lion. 
This figure, said to be one of the Cobham family, lords of the 
manor in the fourteenth century, has been shamefully mutilated, 
one side having been cut away, and the legs entirely destroyed.^ 
(Plate X.) 

In the floor of the north chapel, behind the organ, and removed 
here from the south chapel, is the beautiful brass figured in Kite's 
Brasses of Wiltshire, plate 2. It is undated, but it bears a close 
resemblance to the Bettisthorne brass at Mere, 1398, It is probably 
a member of Quintin family, of Bupton, in this parish. 

Over the south door is an interesting Tablet of wood, with 
painted inscription : — 

" Heare lyeth the bodye of Elizabeth Godard, wife of John Godard, 
Esqvier, and davghter to Sir Kobart Pheteplas, Knight, who deseced 
in the yeare of ovr Lord 1585." _ 

Above is the date of erection, 1605, and a shield : Gules a. 
chevron vaire between three crescents argent, goddard, impaling, 
gules two chevrons argent fettiplace ensigned with two helmets. 
Crests : A stag's head couped at the neck and affrontee gules- 
attired or ; a griffin's head vert, beaked or. 

At the west end of the south aisle is a large and elaborate marble 
monument of excellent workmanship to Thomas Spackman, car- 
penter. A figure in white marble, life size, stands upon an urn, 

^ This effigy is unusual in having the head bare and showing very curly 
hair: The shield on the left arm is a long one, the surcoat comes only to 
the knees, where it lies in many thick folds like a kilt. The one remaining 
arm, which has lost its hand, is covered with chain armour showing no 
trace of plate. From this absence of plate it is considered by Mr. W. H. 
St. John Hope and other good authorities that the effigy is of the last- 
quarter of the thirteenth century, and therefore older than the recess in 
which it lies. There is a somewhat similar bareheaded effigy at Sainton, 
in Holderness. The disc or fan-shaped object on the helm is, Mr. Hope 
tells me, found on many examples of thirteenth century seals, and preceded 
the use of true crests.— E.H.G. 



By C. E. Panting, F.S.A. 427 

and teaches a l)oy and a girl to write on eitlier side, a carpenter's 
bag with his tools lies at his feet (Plate X.). ]>elow is this in- 
scription : — 

" Sacred to the memory of Mr, Thomas Spackman, Carpenter, a native 
of this parish, who being blessed by Providence after many yeares 
industry and frugality in London, retired to Kimbolton in Huntingdon- 
shire, where he died October the 13th, 1786, aged 76 years, and was 
buried agreeable to his will within the aisle close to this monument, 
the 29th of the same month. In his last Will and Testament (after 
making ample provision for his wife and six nephews and nieces) he 
bequeathed the sum of One Thousand Pounds sterling to be laid out 
and invested in the purchase of Pank three per cent, consolidated 

k Annuities in the names of trustees, the Dividends thereof for ever to 
be disposed of as follows, viz.. First for the repairing and keeping clean 
this monument, and painting the iron railings once in every five years. 
Secondly to apply the sum of Thirty Pounds yearly for the support and 
maintenance of a school master to teach all the poor children of this 
|L parish reading, writing, and arithmetic. The residue of the said 
I Dividends to be disposed of in Loaves of bread to the poor of this 
B parish every Sunday morning in this Church." 

^k On the north wall is a helmet of the beginning of the 16tli 

^Rntury. A canopied tomb constructed of chalk once existed 

in the north chapel, from which the two kneeling figures, supposed 

lo be John and Eliz. Goddard, now on either side of the chancel 

arch above the screen, were probably taken. 

' This Church is on a scale distinctly above the ordinary run of 

I village Churches both in design and material, for tlie proportions 

' are stately, the whole is faced externally with freestone on the 

1 south side, and the work is very thorough and good. 

There are the following modern stained glass windows : — 

The east window. To the memory of the Pev. Edward 

Goddard, (li(Ml Tl\\i\ Jan., 18.'J0, and Anniea Susan, his wife. 

The small two-light window on the south side within i ho rails, 

to Anne Elizabeth, wife of IT. N". Goddard, who died 

Feb. '21st. 1849, aged .'U, and Katherine Annie, (heir 

(lan-bl(M-, wlio .lii'd Nov. 19, ISf)!. ag.vl 9 years Also 

Susan Wt'iden and IMward W'cidcn. their eliildien, who 

(lied in inlaney. 

The wesleriininst- twn-li;_^]it wiielow tni t hi' snut h side nf t he 

chancel has <dass ]i\' INiwcll tn the nienmrv of Ileralio 



428 Notes on the Chtirches of Ashley, Berivick Bassett, etc. 

Nelson Goddard, died Dec. 8th, 1900, aged 94, and Elizabeth 
Agnes, his wife, died April 30th, 1890, aged 80. 
On a board in the tower is the modern copy of an extract from 

" The Will of Thomas Spackman dated June 5th, 16V5. I do charge 
my land with twenty-one shillings by the year, or yearly and to 
continue for ever ; viz. : one shilling to the Minister of the Parish to 
mind him of his duty in Catechizing the children ; twenty shillings to 
the Poor of the Parish yearly, to be given them at the Church, viz. : 
five shillings on St. Thomas' day ; five shillings on the Annunciation 
of the Blessed Virgin Mary ; five shillings on St. John Baptist day ; 
and five shilhngs on St. Matthew's day. My will is that Twenty poor 
people do receive Threepence apiece, and that they be at the Church 
at the beginning of prayers, or else to have no share. If the number 
be not twenty, then the remainder to be given to those that are best 
deserving, and if they can let them sing the fifteenth Psalm. Now if 
the minister be a good man, he will be careful to see this my 
will performed, for the honour of the Church, that at this day 
is almost destitute." 



The Chukch of S. Swithun, Compton Bassett. 

Clerestoried nave with north and south aisles and western tower 
of old work, modern north porch and chancel, with north and south 
aisles and vestry on the north. 

The walls of the north aisle appear to have been re-built (ex- 
cepting the doorway) during the eighteenth century,and one window 
was inserted when the new chancel with its aisle and the vestry 
were built. These new parts were carried out under the legacy 
of the Eev. W. Dalby, Piector, who died in 1863. 

The arcades of the nave are each of three bays with deep 
responds; the north arcade is the earlier, a very common arrange- 
ment, and may be said to be the work of quite the end of the 
twelfth century. The arches are pointed, two orders of chamfers 
without label, the columns and responds are circular and have 
square bases and caps, the eastern two with scallop carving, the 
others merely worked to the same outline. The arches of the 
south arcade are similar, but the capitals of the columns are 
moulded and of distinctly thirteenth century character. The 
clerestory is divided into bays corresponding with the arcades by 
shallow buttresses, on the outside, each bay having a three-light 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 



429 



square- headed window of the fifteenth century — the cusping of 
the western window on the north side and of all on the south has 
been cut away. Both arcades are much out of the vertical and in 
need of being made secure. The nave has a barrel-vaulted roof 
supported on wall shafts coming well down on to good corbels 
carved to represent bishops and kings alternately ; the plastering 
in the panels is obviously modern and conceals part of tlie 
mouldings on the ribs. The north aisle is ceiled, the south aisle 
has an open-timbered lean-to roof. 

The chancel arch is a fifteenth century one of two orders of 
mouldings, the inner order supported on corbels, probably of the 
fourteenth century. The rood-stair is on the south side and its 
wall splayed off as if for a niche. On the east respond of the 
north aisle is a complete hour-glass in iron frame and below this 
a stone corbel. 




■Hi f h«^ 



Cuiui.t.Mi I'.assill. ll-iir -la» on pillai- ikmi- i-iilpit 



The town- arch (ii<>\v hhu-kcd up) is uf t we ..rdci s of li..llo\vs. 
i over it can be seen ihc wcalhcr-mMuld ..f an earlier n>nf sprin-ing 



430 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

at the level of the present roof corbels. The tower is of three 
stages divided on the outside by well-moulded string-courses ; it 
has good plinth and base moulds and an embattled parapet ; at the 
angles are diagonal pinnacles carried the full height of the tower, 
which have lost the pinnacles which once surmounted them. The 
stair turret is on the north, octagonal, and carried above tlie tower, 
but its parapet has gone. The west window of the lower stage is 
a pointed one of three lights with outside label having shield 
terminals; below it is a four-centred doorway with similar labels. 
The four belfry windows have pointed arches and labels, and there 
is a two-light window in the west of the middle stage. 

The south aisle is nicely-treated Perpendicular work with 
plinth and base-mould, cornice and embattled parapet, it has a 
buttress at the end only. In the wall is built part of an incised 
grave slab. The north doorway has a moulded and labelled four- 
centred arch, over which is a niche with circular corbel and ogee 
arch. The font has an octagonal bowl with quatrefoiled sides, on 
a modern stem and base. 

I have left to be separately described the gem of the Church — 
its exquisite stone screen. The screen is a double one with a 
passage between which has a vaulted ceiling with moulded ribs 
and two rows of panels representing one half of a four-centred 
arch, springing from the top of the inner screen and abutting 
against the outer (Plate III.). 

The outer (or western) screen is of three bays, divided by diagonal 
piers with attached rolls on the angles having octagonal bases of 
good depth ; similar rolls occur on the jambs. Between the rolls 
are flat hollows which are carried around the arches ; these have 
two tiers of niches in the vertical parts and carved patterns below. 
On the underside of the arches, in place of the inner roll, is an in- 
verted cresting; the vertical roll being carried up to intersect with 
the lower member of the cornice ; the spandrels formed between 
these and the arches are filled with carving of a most delicate and 
refined type. The cornice has one order of vine carving, with five- 
pointed leaf; above this is an order of paterae — one being a 
centaur — and an embattled coping. 



By C. E. Pontinfj, I\S.A. 431 

The iiiiier screen (whicli is lower than tlie outer to the extent 
of the depth of tlie vaulting) stops short of the full width on the 
south to admit of the stair, and has a corresponding respond on 
the north. The central opening has a four-centred arch below a 
transom, and the space on each side of it is divided into three 
bays, with transom and ogee-heads carried across over, the arches 
having carved crockets and finials and a line of carved cresting 
coming under the vaulting; on the east face the veitical space 
above this level, for the depth of the vault, is plain. Unlike the 
outer screen, the lower part of this is solid. The rood loft over 
the screens doubtless had an oak parapet, which is lost. The 
whole screen is a carefully-studied design, and dates from tlie 
first lialf of the fifteenth century.^ 



The Church of S. Laurence, IIilmartox. 

Plan : — Chancel with sacristy on the north and organ chamber 
on the south; nave with north aisle; south porch and western 
tower. 

From notes by the late Canon Goddard, dated January 28th, 1S88, 
on the "Hilmarton Terrier," dated January 17th, 1704, I have ex- 
tracted the following: — 

" The Church had been subject to a so-called restoration l)ef<.u'e 
my time — I believe when Mr. Stewart was Vicar. I\Ir. Shaw was 
the architect employed and about £600 T have heard was lai^l tjut 
upon it; the tower was re-built from about the top of the west 
window; the chancel was very much and very unsuccessfully 
restored. 

"Some years afterwards the south porch was l>uilt uudei- ihe 
<l(\sign of Mr. Henry Weaver. In 1.S70 ibc lalc William II. ■my 
Toynder, VjSi^., undertook an tMi(ii(> resloiaLion li)' .Mr. Suvci, 
and about £2.")00 was ex])endt'(l, and most satisfactorily. \\\- 
tenially not much was done, only the organ chamber was built 



' A curious t radii ioii MH'iiis to lia\-i' arisen tliat this screen c:iiuc trom 
\\'iiu'licstta- ( atlicdrul. Tin. re srenis, however, no reasi.)n wliatrv. r t,. 
suppose that it was not built fur tlic i»liice it occupie.'^. lvH.(J. 



432 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

and the north wall of the north aisle carried out 1ft. 8in., and re- 
built. Internally, great alterations were made — a gallery in the 
tower removed, all the old sittings of oak cut down and many new 
ones added. The roof of the nave taken to pieces, braced up with 
iron, repaired and replaced without the plaster ceiling, the roof of 
the north aisle entirely renewed. 

" The old pulpit was retained but placed on a stone platform. 
A new stone arch to the south door ; new stone heads to the tower 
windows and to all the windows of the nave ; the columns of the 
nave, which were declining 1ft., forced back into the perpendicular 
by means of screws before the roof was placed on them; a new 
stone floor to the tower and tile pavement to the nave and chancel, 
the ancient flagstones laid down as flooring to the north aisle ; the 
tombs of the Jacob family laid over the arch of the heating ap- 
paratus (which was new) and the organ chamber placed above 
them ; the walls of the chancel taken off as far as the spring of 
the arch of the windows and new arches of ashlar constructed for 
them, the roof of the chancel entirely new." 

Apropos of the above I would add that the tower appears to 
have been wholly re-built in 1840, although an inscription is 
carried round it " To the Glory of God this Tower was restored 
by a Layman Anno Domini mdcccxl. I.S." (the latter, a mono- 
gram, appears to be that of the architect). With the inscription 
are carved the following arms : — See OF Sarum | Eoyal aems | 

POYNDER. 

The "stone heads " to the nave windows refer to new inner 
arches, moulded sills were also added. North and south oak doors 
and stone doorways were put. In the chancel, the fifteenth 
century three-light east window was raised, the three-light window 
on north and a similar one on south almost entirely renewed and 
diagonal buttresses added. The fifteenth century octagonal font 
bowl was set on a new base and step. A flying buttress was 
built to support the aisle arcade. 

Of the ancient work — the oldest part is the arcade of four bays 
of later twelfth century work between nave and north aisle, the 
western two arches of which have labels on the nave side only — 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 



433 



the others on botli sidea. The coluirins are cyhndrical with moulded 
bases, one has a plaiiily-iiiouUh^d cap, and the other two scallop 
carving. 

The cliaucel arch, prol)ably early fifteenth century, has two 
orders of hollows on jambs and arch stopping on octagonal bases ; 
across it is a simple stone screen of later Perpendicular of four 
bays each side of the central opening, the lower [)art is of solid 
masonry. On one side this is wrought and the other plastered, 
the oak beam is modern. (This, with Compton Bassett and High- 
way, makes three screens of stone within three miles' radius.) In 
the north janjb of the arch is a S([uint, northward of which is an 
ambulatory passage (as at Avebury) and beyond this again the 
rood stair going up over the ambulatory; the stair door cuts 
through the Norman respond of the arcade. 




Ililiiiark)!!. Sfrceii, i)as.sa<;-e to north aislr ;iiiil si|iiiiit, Iron 
the {'liaiiccl. 



In the south wall nf tho na\-o arc the icniains of a piscina, ah^o 
a three-li'4li( wimlow wcslward n\ ihc pmch and iwu siniihir 
windows (Mstwird iA it; tho w.ill is dt' ruhl>lo with froestone 
haso and ihroo lail t ros.sos. — iho t.iio opposite tho east wall a 
vory (loop ono, [Uohahly lo resist sotllonu'nls whioh aro still in 
progit'ss, 



434 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berioick Bassett, etc. 

The roof of the nave is a fifteenth century one of trussed-rafter 
type with moulded principals, ribs and three purlins with carved 
bosses at the intersections. 




Hilmarton. Passage from north aisle to chancel, with squint and 
entrance to rood loft stairs, from the aisle. 



The sacristy is of early fifteenth century work, and has a single- 
light cusped window, in the east end ; the chancel walls are 
probably nearly a century later. 

In the north wall of the aisle is a recessed tomb with ogee arch, 
label, and pinnacles, some feet above the floor, at which level it 
was placed when re-built with the wall ; bones were found beneath 
it when removed. 

Some of the seats have old traceried ends ; the parish chest is a 

W.P. E.S 

plain one of oak with 1793 i^^ brass nails; a black letter 

chained Bible and two hatchments are preserved in the Church. 
The initials of William and Mary Quintin, curiously connected 



By G. E. Pontiufj, F.^.A, 435 

by lines, and the dates 1651 and 1647 are cut on a ledger stone 
in the floor of the north aisle. 

On the wall of the new organ chamber are three brass plates 
from coffins which lie beneath. 

The oak screen in the tower arch, a memorial to Canon Goddard, 
was erected in 1892 from the design of the writer of these notes. 



Sir Stephen Glynne's notes, taken April 27tli, 1850, are as 
follows : — 

\_Hillinarton S. Lawrence. This Church has a nave with north 
aisle, chancel, west tower, and south porch. The latter large and 
plain. The whole with tiled roofs. Tlie arcade of the nave is 
First P. of four arches, the columns circular, two liaving capitals 
of rude foliage, differing in character and without necking. The 
eastern pillar has a moulded capital of circular form — the bases a 
wall square. The west respond is foliated, ending in an octagon 
drawn to a point. The eastern pier is cut through by a door 
opening into the chancel, which is set obliquely and seems Third 
P. On the north side of the chancel arch over this door are the 
steps to the rood-loft in the pier, also adjacent to it a narrow squint 
into the chancel. The chancel arch is lofty and continuous. That 
to the tower is similar. The nave has a coved roof, ribbed with 
gilt bosses. The aisle has a sloping roof, also with gilt bosses. 
There are several old open benches in the nave. In the wall of 
the north aisle an ogee sepulchral arch, having finial and bold 
feathering, and llank'cd by [)innacle3. The window.s in the na\e 
and aisle are all Third P'^ of three lights, some square-headed. In 
the chancel arch is a rood-scre(Mi of fair Third P. wo()d-\vt)rk [an 
error, it is of stone. — Kl). |, haxiiig an ogm; dour in the ccnlre. The 
cast, window is of ihrtM' liulil> and Third I*., also lliosr north and 
south of the chancel. < )\-or the caslcrn one is a niodt'iai I'irrular 
li^hl, lillcd with paiiiLed gla.ss. The .sacrariuin is laid withniarl'lc 
and has no rails. The chancel has an opon 1 iinhcr r"of, lalcl v 
repairc(l. ThiM^haiiccl is imi powcil — huL has boni'hcs for children. 
Tliere is a vcsLry on Uic n.)rLh of I he chancel wii h-si|uarc-lu\idcd 



436 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc, 

single windows. The vestry opens to the chancel by a continuous 
doorway, and the door has wood tracery. The tower has been 
recently restored, or almost re-built, in a late Third P. style ; three 
stages in heiglit, with battlement and four large pinnacles; an 
octagonal turret on the south side, the belfry windows double, the 
west window of three lights, and below it a door. On the tower 
is the following legend : — " To the glory of God this tower was 
restored by a Layman anno Dom\ Mdcccxl," with the royal arms 
and those of the See of Sarum and the then Incumbent[an error,ED.]. 
The font has an octagonal bowl, panelled with quatref oiled circles 
on a stem of like character. There is an organ at the east end of 
the aisle. The parapets are moulded — the north aisle abounds 
with buttresses.] 



The Church of S. Mary. Lydiard Tregoze {or Ewyas). 

Chancel with south chapel, nave with north and south aisles and 
south porch with modern vestry, and a western tower. 

The Church as it stands is a Perpendicular building, having 
been re-built during that period, but there remain a few bits of 
material evidence of an older Church, e.g., the carved heads forming 
the terminals of the late label to the inner doorway of the porch 
look like twelfth century work, and the plain octagonal font 
probably dates from the thirteenth century. 

The re-building was doubtless a gradual process, the earliest 
feature which exists is the east window of the chapel, which is 
late fourteenth century work, when the chapel may have been re- 
built ; the rest of the pre-Eeformation re-building took place during 
the fifteenth century, the tower being the latest. 

The chancel has a three-light pointed east window having an 
outside label with terminals representing a male and a female 
figure ; on either side of this window are two semi-circular arched 
single lights with outside mouldings of Elizabethan type which 
appear to have been worked on earlier stones in situ, so that these 
may conceivably be late Norman, rather than sixteenth century 
insertions. In the north wall is a two-light window with square 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 437 

head ; on the south side there was probably an arcli communicating 
with the chapel before the re-modelling of tlie latter. 

The circular plaster ceiling doubtless conceals the original ruof, 
like that of the nave. 

The east window of the chapel is a two-light pointed one. In the 
south wall are two two-light windows with square heads and labels 
and between them a doorway which is a late insertion ; there is a 
diagonal buttress at the south-east angle. The arch communicating 
with the south aisle is of the same period as the nave arcades ; it 
has attached jamb shafts with moulded caps and splayed bases, 
arch of two orders of chamfers and no label. Doubtless there was a 
similar arch opening into the chancel, and this was probably removed 
in 1633, when the chancel was re-modelled by John St. John, the 
opening widened and the present arrangement substituted — a wood 
lintel and cornice supported by three stone columns, with square 
caps having pendant ornaments at the angles. The fiat ceiling 
and parapet are part of the same work. 

The nave retains its original early fifteenth century roof, each 
pair of rafters having its collar and braces. Moulded ribs are 
])laced at intervals, rising from head corbels, and there are three 
moulded purlins. There is a good corbel table under the eaves on 
the south side. A commonsense plan of obtaining more light has 
since been adopted by the insertion of three dormers as clerestory 
on the south side. In the north clerestory there are two three- 
light modern windows, but these appear to liave taken the place 
of older ones which were carried higher, as the rafters are 
" trimmed " for this. 

The chancel arch is a pointed one with two orders of hollow 
niDuld carried round arch and jambs. Aljove it are two single- 
li'j;ht windows of 'Ijidor type obviously inserted to li'^hi the rood 
1m|'i„ l)iit anterior to the painlotl dtH-oraiions. ( )\'or I his wall nn 
\\u) outside is a })icturesi|ue sanctus-bell cot with spindt'l and 
linial. Thcic arc marks of the gudgeon of the l)ell in the sitle.s. 

Th(^ north arcado nt' ihii^o Ijays of ]iointed arches is of twi* orders 
tit cbainl'crs carriiMl duwn tho shafts and stopped en llio ba>o. The 
responds arc unusually drcp and a niodeni optuiiiiL;,- has bfon t'ornied 



438 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

through the eastern one, probably occupying the position of the 
former stair to the loft. The south arcade is of a different type 
and slightly earlier, it has octagonal pillars with moulded caps and 
bases, the responds having demi-shafts, the chamfers of the arches 
die out on an octagonal drum at the springing, otherwise they are 
similar to those on the north. 

The north aisle, known as the Pleydell Aisle, has three three- 
light square-headed windows, with cinquefoil cusping and labels, 
in the north wall ; there are buttresses square with the walls at 
the angles and between the windows ; there is a step in the string- 
course at the east end, the object of which seems obscure. The 
east window is similar to those on the north, but of two lights. 
The usual north door opposite the south does not occur. This 
aisle retains its original roof. 

The south aisle is similarly divided by buttresses on the outside 
into three bays, and the porch occupies one of these, in each of 
the other two is a three-light window of somewhat better and 
earlier type than those of the north aisle, having two orders of 
mouldings instead of a single one and carved paterae in the label 
terminals. The west window is quite distinct in character, it is a 
slightly-pointed one of three lights, with trefoil cusping, each liglit 
having a trefoil in the tracery. 

The south doorway has jambs and pointed arch moulded with 
two orders of cavetto, the label having the early terminals before 
referred to. The porch is of fifteenth century work, this and the 
chapel having been erected at about the same time, and the em- 
battled parapets of these continued along the south aisle, the walls 
of which were already in existence. The outer doorway of the 
porch has similar mouldings to the inner (although of later date)> 
and there are diagonal buttresses at the angles. 

The tower is of three stages; the lower has deep plinth and base 
mould, a three-light west window with labelled arch, and beneath the 
sill a doorway which is a later insertion ; in the middle stage there 
are small lights in south and west sides ; the upper stage has a 
two-light belfry window of bald type in each face, and is sur- 
mounted by a parapet pierced with five quatrefoils on each side 



By G. E. Ponting, F.S.A. 439 

and crocketted pinnacles at the angles. There are diagonal 
buttresses with three set offs at the angles of the tower; the stair 
turret on the north is square on the outside, and retains its original 
inside door. 

Across the chancel arch is an interesting oak screen with the 
arms of James the First carved on each side ; this had Ijeen re- 
moved and placed against the east wall, over the arch, hut was 
replaced in 1901 (Plate XIV.). 

The railing and gates enclosing the sanctuary are a magnificent 
example of late I7tli century metal work and, although probably 
of Italian workmanship, were evidently made for their position. 
In the centre of each gate is the monogram S.J, intertwined and 
reversed, while in each of the panels to which the gates are hung 
is the crest of the St. Johns, on a wreath. These panels are treated 
as pilasters with capitals ornamented by the acanthus leaf, and are 
surmounted by vases. The frame-work is forged into elaborate 
scroll work enriched by overlying foliage and festoons of beaten 
iron relieved by cherubs, while gilding has been lavished upon the 
more ornate parts — the whole having a very rich effect. Along 
the top rail are a number of triple spikes to give additional pro- 
tection, and the idea of a guard fence seems to have predominated 
over that of communicants' rails. 

The seventeenth and eighteenth century pews remain almost 
intact. 

Interesting as are the architectural features of this Church it is 
more remarkable for the unusual wealth of its old glass, mural 
paintings, and monuments. Indeed, Aubrey says of the Churcli : 
''Hereis l)ut little that savours of venerable antiquity, but for modern 
monuments and ornaments it exceeds all the Churches in lliis 
countie " (it must be remembered that the monuments had unly 
been recently erected when Au])rcy wrote),' 

Tlie hinaldic glass in the windows is fully set forth in Jackson's 

^ The elaborate series of monuments and eftigies of the St. John family 
of the end of the IGth and 17th i-entnrios are not d escribed in tlii.^ i>aj)er. 
»SV< Jackson'.s y//^/A?fv, ]»]>. 175—182. lllu.striition.s are however i,'iven of 
them in mates XVI. aiul XVIl. 

vol,. XXXVIl. — SO. CXVll. 2 N 



440 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Bertvick Bassett, etc. 

Aubrey, Plates XIV., XV., and XVI., so that it need not be re- 
peated here, beyond calling attention to the east window of the- 
chancel, particularly the olive tree in the central light bearing six 
shields showing the descent of the heiress of Beauchamp, wife of 
Sir Oliver St. John. In the left-hand light is a figure of S. John 
the Baptist standing on a coronet and holding a book bearing a 
lamb ; in the right hand a figure of St. John the Evangelist ; 
these two with the olive tree suggesting a rebus on the name Oliver 
St. John. 

In connection with the heraldry, attention may be called to the 
cabinet against the north wall of the chancel, containing full-length 
portraits of Sir John St. John (died 1594) and his wife Lucy 
daughter and co-heir of Sir Walter Hungerford) and their son Sir 
John and Ann his wife (daughter of Sir Thomas Leigh ton) with 
their six daughters, who were all titled ladies, with a pedigree on 
the outside of the doors. " This was erected by Sir John St. John, 
Kt. and Bart., in the year 1615 the 20th of July." To this in- 
scription is added the following memorandum :— " Some remains 
of Sir Richard S. George Kt., Garter King at Arms, relating to the 
Pedigree of St. John written in the year 1615 and now transcribed 
this present year 1694." 

Aubrey mentions in the " third window of the north aisle " 
paintings of two bishops and other religious persons with their 
heads shaven ; also three men in armour ; and a priest habited in 
white with a red cross sal tire on his breast, joining the hands of a 
man and woman in matrimony, and he gives a sketch of the head- 
gear of the woman. He also says there were thirty pennons in the 
chancel aisle. 

The mural paintings were opened out during the repairs carried 
out at the Church in 1901. The first subject on the west spandrel 
on the north arcade is an interesting problem, and to show how far 
one may be carried by predisposition and imagination I would 
mention that, on opening out these fragments, I came to the con- 
clusion that the subject was that of S. George and the Dragon, and 
on my looking at it subsequently with so high an authority as the 
Bishop of Bristol, his lordship pointed out the figure of the king's 



By C. E. Pontiny, F.S.A. 441 

daughter, Cleoliiida, looking over the saint's shoulder. Subse- 
quently our Secretary, Mr. Goddard, having examined it with 
another high authority, Mr. Keyser, wrote telling me that this 
subject first suggested itself to them, but that they afterwards 
abandoned it, and were quite convinced that the subject represented 
was one so divergent as the Martyrdom of S. Thomas of Canterbury! 
I saw it afterwards with Mr. Goddard, and then wrote the following 
notes (as regards subject No. I.) : — 

On the north wall of the nave four subjects divided by borders 
coming over the apex of the arches. The subjects are, reading 
from the west : — 

1. The martyrdom of S. Thomas of Canterbury. The figure of 
the Archl)ishop is almost destroyed and the three-light clerestory 
window of sixteenth century date has obliterated the upper corner 
of the subject, but parts of his robes are visible, also a border which 
might be connected with the altar. His mitre in red and cream 
colour is laid on a chequered pavement of red and buff which is 
carried down the arch and extends under the figures. The figure 
of a man in plate armour with a bascinet helmet, his riglit arm 
uphfted grasps a club (or the hilt of his sword), his left leg ap- 
parently trampling on the figure of the Archbishop. A black 
sheath by his right side. His face wears a diabolical expression. 
Behind him stands a second knij^ht, holdinc^ the hilt of his sword 
in l)()th hands and thrusting at the Archbishop. He wears a short 
red surcoat with jagged edges, and sheath armour on his legs ; 
only the front of his face remains. The outer hollow mould of 
the arch is enriched l)y a beautiful floriated border in red. 

2. On the spandrel over the first column from the west. (This 
is much interfered with by a tablet to Jane Hardynian, 1761, 
eldest daughter of Raufe Freke, of Hannington). In the centre is 
a kind of temple with central s[)ire and two side turrets, llaiiked 
by trees; westward of this is (he tigur(^ of what looks like a 
watchman or pilgrim with staff, and carrying a lantern , the upjtiu' 
part of the head is lost. On the right of the centre, and of the 
right tree is tlie keep of a castle or wallod town ; the main building 
has a turret at each angle and in one ol these, as in one main 

'1 N L' 



442 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

wall, are loop openings in the form of a cross and with circular 
ends; in the other wall is a triple window, with semicircular 
arclies with gable over, in the centre of which is a single- 
light window, flanked by two circular ones. The courtyard 
of the castle is surrounded by a wall, in which is a gateway 
having semi-arch and gabled roof flanked by turrets. There 
are other buildings inside the walls, the roofs are gabled and a 
spire occurs to the left of the castle, and one of the buildings has 
a triple-light window. Farther east is the chapel, a building with 
two single-light windows in its south wall and a cross on the east 
gable ; it has another gabled roof on the north side of it and two 
lead-covered spires with ball terminals. The chapel appears to 
be partly outside the wall ; there is a still further gabled building 
adjoining, entirely outside. A tree appears in the background 
between the two spires of the chapel. This subject has a border of 
red and black lines, extending to the apex of the arch on either side. 

3. Over the second pillar from the west is a small piece of 
geometrical decoration in squares, and on this a coating of thin 
plaster has been applied, with later decoration in lozenges, both in 
red. Above this on the same surface as the latter are fragments 
of che arabesque ornament, this in red and black, but the subject 
is too indistinct to be deciphered ; it is cut off from the last subject 
by the border surrounding No. 2. 

4. In the next spandrel are traces of geometrical decoration of 
the later type, and over it has been painted some inscription in 
black letter, not sufficient to be read. 

On east wall of nave. In the centre over the arch a cross 
of wood appears to have existed, as at Brinkworth ; this was fixed 
to two plugs of wood about 5in. x 4in. spaced 4ft. 9in. apart, 
horizontally ; between the plugs and continued vertically are bands 
where the plaster is free from colour for the width of 5 inches 
(This was partly hidden by the oak shield with the arms of James 
the First, which has since been restored to its position on the 
screen.) On the left of the cross are two figures, outlined in black 
and coloured green ; two others exist on the right, and others 
below ; the one nearest the cross on the right is a female figure 



By 0. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 443 

(no colour is visible) The other is indistinct, but the two outer 
ones have mitres (?). Of the figures below, the right-hand one 
wears a helmet. 

Above the cross are two heads, one full-faced and the other in 
profile. Below the arms of the cross are eight busts, four over 
each side of the central stem. All looking upwards towards the 
cross, excepting a female figure on the right. These are all outlined 
in black, with green colour in some of them. One of the figures 
has slashed doublet, another has a peaked hat ; the lady's dress is 
distinctly not mediaeval, and the whole looks late. These are above 
the level of the apex of arch and the sills of two windows. Below this 
is the Decalogue. Traces of an ornament below this, of olive leaf. 

T!ie black letter is continued on the north wall. On south aisle 
and chancel arch there is an all-over sort of ornamentation in red. 

Inside the south porch. Over the outer doorway is a well-pre- 
served painting representing the head of Christ, with a crown of 
thorns, and surrounded by a cruciform nimbus in yellow and red. 
The head has light hair, and a collar surrounds the neck. No other 
part of the body can have existed as the liead is close down to the 
apex of the arch ; pomegranate decoration exists on each side of 
this, coming down on to the arch. The porch was cut in two by 
a floor and a fireplace has been constructed in the upper part (all 
modern), so that much of the latter was destroyed. 

The nave arcades being of late fourteenth or early fifteenth 
century date, and the original decoration being of a geometrical 
pattern, the subject paintings can hardly be earlier than the 
fifteenth century, but they are not, apparently, hiter than 1450. 

The subject on tlie east wall had becMi washed over and iIk' 
Decalogue painted in black letter; parts of this, of the third and 
fourth coniniandnients, have been preserved, also tlie words " Fear 
God Honor the King," below the rest. 

The a])()\(^ nolvs were wriltiMi bcfort' the wlmlr of the later 
wluLewash had Ixmmi ]>('o1(mI oil'. Since then a medallion })ainting 
has been opened out on (he i»illai- ct' t he snuih aisK\ facing t he 
south entrance. It is about I^in. hi-h, and the sid)jeel is a repri'- 
senlal loll of ( )ur Lord nficr 1 hi> Ivcsuireet ion standing' in the tond» 



444 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berivich Bassett, etc. 

the figure nude to the waist, the hands crossed in front of the 
body with nail-mark in the left hand and spear-mark in right side. 
A crown of thorns is on the head and a cruciform nimbus with red 
outer edge and white spots surrounds it. The background is red 
powdered with blue flowers. The tomb has a rim at the top and 
arched sides. 



Additional notes on the ancient glass in Lydiard Tregoze Church, 
by Eev. K H. Goddard. 

North aisle, west window. The heads of the three lights retain 
their glass, demi figures of angels clad in white with yellow 
wings, halos, and outstretched hands holding scrolls inscribed : 

at»0rttmu» (— ) 
bxxtfecexrx te 

In the small upper lights are leaves of yellow and black, 

North aisle, middle window. Leaves in the tracery. In the heads 

of the two side lights demi-angels as in the west window 

holding scrolls, and in the central light two demi-angels 

holding a scroll. The scrolls are inscribed : 

0la in eKcel&i» t»eor 

jet f iva pav 

ij0xnitjibi bone tyoluia — 

North aisle, east window. Leaves in tracery. In the head of the 
centre light a half-length figure of an angel in white, with 
yellow collar and wings, appearing from a pink cloud (?) with 
outstretched hands. Below this are three figures of archangels 
in yellow feathered dress, against a blue background, with 
red flames between their legs. On the shoulder of the left- 
hand angel is a small shield with blazing star (?), whilst the 
right-hand angel has attached to his belt a shield with three 
rows of pellets (?) The centre angel holds a sceptre. There 
is a flowered border. The heads of the east and west liglits 
contain fragments, a wooden-framed house, and hands holding 
a sceptre. 
South aisle, the westernmost window retains the canopies 

of the subjects in the three lights, and in the tracery a king 



By C. E. Ponting, FXA. 445 

kneeling. A female saint holding a (? tree). Another holding a 

shield. Another holding up her hand. The part of a head. 

South aisle, window to east of south porch. In the heads are four 
figures: (1) a bearded king with blue ermine-lined cloak on 
his shoulders, and puce-coloured robe, with purse at his girdle ; 
(2) a saint in brown against a yellow background, holding an 
open book and pointing to a passage in it ; (3) a bearded figure 
of the same series, preaching (?), holding up both hands. [This 
figure is much mutilated] ; (4) another figure of the same series 
too much nmtilated to make out. 

In the two remaining heads are fragments, a male head 
wearing a cap, and part of a female head amongst fragments 
of elaborate canopy work with which also the heads of the 
three lights are filled. 

South aisle, window behind tomb. A perfect figure belonging to 
the same series as the preceding, in brown on yellow back- 
ground, bearded and wearing a sort of turban. He holds in 
his hands a long tablet inscribed with musical notes (or 
letters ?), and is apparently teaching. 

Chancel. Two windows on south side. Leaves of yellow stain in 
heads of lights. 

Chancel. East-end of south aisle. In quatrefoil head, a seated 
angel playing a mandoline, uncoloured. 

Chancel. North side window. A beautiful crowned head of a 
female saint of fifteenth century glass in one light and broken 
pieces in the other. 

Oliancel. East window. The central window of three liglits 
has three armorial shields at the bottom, and above them tlie 
centre light has an olive tree with six sliields of arms hung 
on it. The nortli liglit has a large figure of St. John Ikipliet, 
])()iiiling to the L;imb. The south a fones|ion<liii'4- ligurc of 
St. doliii lilt' l^]vang(dist. In the four bead liu;!ils art* standing 
iigurt's of aiig(ds, oach holding an oval sliit'Ki charged with 
hcialdic crest. All this glass is of the seventeenth century 
and characteristic of the period. The two outside lights are 
lillc'l with iiKMlcrn ^lass. 



446 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc, 

[Sir Stephen Glynne's notes on this Church, taken June 24tb 
1870, are as follows : — 

Lydiard Tregoze. All Saints {sic). The Church is a pretty good' 
structure, situated near Lord Bolingbroke's mansion, consisting of 
clerestoried nave with aisles, chancel, west tower, and south 
porch. The chancel has tiled roof; the south aisle with nave 
leaded. The tower is late Perpendicular, resembling that of the 
other Lydiard, of two stages with string courses, and parapet 
pierced with quatrefoils, and four crocketted pinnacles. The 
belfry windows of two lights with stone lattice work. On the 
north is a projecting stair turret. On the west side is a three- 
light window and a doorway of late character. The prevailing 
character is Perpendicular^ in fact there seems to be no earlier 
feature. The nave has a ( ? ) of three pointed arches; those 
on the north with plain mouldings continued down square 
piers without capitals, and a ( ? ) small narrow arch next the 
chancel. The southern arcade has three pointed arches with 
large octagonal pillars. The clerestory has late square-headed 
windows. The windows of the north aisle are square-headed,, 
of three lights and labeled. On the south they are similar, except 
one at the west end of the south aisle, which has a flat arch 
and three lights with trefoil over ogee heads. There is a sancte 
bell with pyramidal top over the east end of the clerestory. The 
roof is coved with ribs dividing it into panels. 

The chancel arch is pointed with continuous mouldings. The 
east window is Perpendicular of three lights, and on each side ol 
it is a single light — which is doubtful whether original. 

The chancel has on the north some late square-headed windows. 
The south chapel of the chancel bears the date 1655 — when it was 
probably built, or at any rate re-constructed. It has a priest's 
door and square-headed labeled windows, and opens to the aisle 
of the nave by a pointed arch, to the chancel by pillars supporting 
an entablature. Both chancel and south chapel abound in costly 
marble monuments to the St. Johns of the sixteenth and seven- 
teenth centuries. 



By C. K Pontiwj, F.S.A. 447 

There are also some ancient banners and helmets and some 
coloured glass in the windows. 

The south porch is large and embattled. 

The font has an octagonal bowl, on stem of like shape.] 



WiNTERBOURNE Bassett. S. Katiiarine (modern dedication 

S. Peter.) 

Plan — Chancel ; nave, with arcade of three bays in the north 
wall, the easternmost of which is occupied by a north transept, and 
the other two by a north aisle; western tower, and south porch. 

The walls of this Church (except the tower) as of all others 
along this valley, are built of sarsen stones roughly broken. There 
is no evidence that the masons of the middle ages attempted to 
work this hard material to a face and even the breaking of the 
boulders into manageable fragments was done after the middle of 
last century, by means of fire, followed by sudden cooling with 
cold water. 

In this Ciiurch we have some of the most beautiful features 
existing in the county of the somewhat rare "Decorated" period, 
which may be roughly put as contemporary with the three Edwards 
and, altliough the font indicates the previous existence of a jSTorman 
Church, no structural work remains earlier than the fourteenth 
century. The Decorated work is of the time when the manor was 
held l)y the Despencers (Hugli Despencer, the elder), to wliom it 
came through the l^issets, and it was commenced by the erection 
of the nortli transept, north aisle, and tlie nave arcade. The 
transept was Uu^ chapi;! oi" llio family and was approacluMl b\- a 
doorway in the north aisle, whicli latter is very narrow and .seems 
to have been designed as an adjunct to the chapel, and hatl no 
window until over a centur}- later. 

Till' transept is ^-abled on llio north side, and in this wall i> a 
throe-li-lit wiiidnw of ox(|uisito dcsi-ii ; t lio janil)s and arcli are 
moulded on tlio outside, and tlio ninllioiis and trai-ei'V insi(K» and 
out, with I wo orders of mouldings, in an unusual decree of licimesa 
and ri'liiuMuent . The t racerv is of t he rol iculated foim; on the 



448 Notes on the Chiorches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

inside the window has a moulded curtain arch, carried on attached 
shafts on the jambs with delicately carved caps. There are labels 
inside and outside, the former have terminals representing female 
heads. Under the window, inside, is a coeval recessed tomb with 
pointed arch with two orders of mouldings springing at 18in. above 
the floor. From this front a sub-arch of ogee form, limited to the 
inner order of moulding, is carried across to support four figures, 
and this arch only is cusped on the under side. At the apex of 
the sub-arch is carried up a double shaft with cap for two figures, 
and a canopy of ogee form, carved and moulded, is worked on the 
main arch over this group (the figures of which are missing) ; the 
crockets and finial of this canopy are exquisitely carved. On either 
side of the double pedestal, and at a lower level, are two others 
with short octagonal shafts having caps moulded only ; these figures 
are also missing. The whole composition of tomb and window over 
is most beautiful, all the more so from not being too elaborately 
carved, much of the effect being obtained by well-studied mouldings. 

Within the tomb, but obviously not belonging, is a thirteenth 
century slab on which are sculptured the figures of a man and 
woman, the former with curly hair and a beard ; the woman wears 
the wimple ; the right hands of the two are clasped between the 
bodies, the drapery is of a nice simple type. These probably 
represent members of the Basset family, who received the manor 
from King John and held it until 1271. 

The doorway in the aisle is nearly close to the transept wall 
and it exhibits the same refined taste ; it has a four-centred arch 
with carved paterae of ball-flower set in four leaves (the one in the 
apex being cleverly arranged with five leaves) connected by con- 
tinuous stems, all set in a hollow mould. Over the door is a nicely- 
moulded label having one head terminal, the other a perfectly 
plain corbel the purpose of which is not clear — it appears to be 
coeval with the rest of the work (Plate XX.) . 

The nave arcade of three pointed arches is of two orders of 
mouldings of the wave-mould type, carried down the jambs and 
pillars to low bases of octagonal form, dying on to a square ; the 
-easternmost of these arches forms the entrance to the transept, and 



By C. E. Pontimj, F.S.A. 449 

its mouldings aie slightly more enriched, an arch across the aisle 
from the pillar forming the west jamb of the west wall of the 
transept is similarly enriched on the inside only, and the manner 
in which the mouldings are intersected in the angle is very Flam- 
boyant (Plate XIX.). 

Following upon the north transept came the re-building of the 
chancel — the two two-light windows on the south, and two on the 
north being of the same " flowing " type, but less richly treated ; they 
have labels outside with interesting terminals. (In the tracery of 
one north window are fragments of contemporary glass.) The 
upper part of the arch and tracery in each case is modern and the 
walling also from the same level; it would appear from this and 
the bulging walls that the walls were at some time lowered, with 
the object of lessening the weight on the foundation, and raised to 
their original level in 1857. 

There is a charming coeval piscina with shelf in the south wall, 
with ogee arch and good tracery: it has circular dishing in a 
square bowl. 

The chancel arch has somewhat similar mouldings to the nave 
arcade — two orders of the wave-mould in the arch, but, unlike the 
arcade, the inner order is stopped on tall wall-shafts with moulded 
capitals supported on corbel heads, one being that of a queen with 
crown and the other a bearded man uncrowned. The outer mould 
dies on to the chamfered jambs. 

It will be observed that there is no external plinth either in the 
chancel or the transept, but the latter and the aisle have diag<jnal 
buttresses, while the chancel is witlnrnt them. 

The south wall of the nave a})pearH to have been a good dtMl 
alttu'ed, but the i)art eastward of the })()rch without plinth is 
probably earlier than the rest, and tin' three-light window inserted 
Jiere is of a very latt% debased type. 

The four-li^ht- poiiilcd window west ward of tlif south ])ondi is a 
beautiful sijimmuhmi of the work of the middle of the tifttH'nth 
century. ^ hH> womltMs why so lar^o a window inserted s«Miear to 
the west end was put,; this p.iit. of tlu- wall appears to have been 
ro-built at, this liino, lor it has a plinth and is the ..nly pi«*oe, 



450 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

excepting the tower, which possesses this feature — the wall is also, 
unlike the rest, faced with freestone. There is a large buttress 
near the east end of this wall with plinth, base and two set-offs 
which appears to have been added at about the same time to resist 
some movement in the abutment of the chancel arch. 

The south door is a rather poor one of late Perpendicular, with 
four-centred arch. 

The two-light fifteenth century window before referred to, in- 
serted in the earlier wall of the north aisle, is of a very heavy and 
quite different type from the one last described, and it has no label. 

The western tower is a splendid specimen of this Wiltshire type 
of the latter half of the fifteenth century, and it at once inspires 
one with the feeling that it is an honest and thorough bit of work, 
and built with good stone, many of the blocks being of unusually 
large dimensions. The tower is four stages in height above an 
unusually deep base. The stages are divided by string-courses 
outside, the central one heavier than the others (Plate XVIIL). 
It has diagonal buttresses carried up to the commencement of the 
upper stage, with pinnacles on one of the set-offs. The stair-turret 
is carried up square on plan to the middle of the third stage, 
above which it is octagonal and rises above the tower. Both hava 
embattled parapets. 

The lower stage has a fine three-light pointed and labelled west 
window, deeply recessed jamb and sill mouldings, and the lower 
string is dropped to come under it; below this is a four-centred 
doorway with square returns to its label. The archway into the 
nave is of tall and graceful proportions. Attached shafts on the 
jambs, having moulded caps and bases, support the inner of the 
three orders of the arch ; the hollow of the outer order is carried 
down. A single-light window on the north lights the third stage, 
and the belfry stage has four two-light pointed windows with labels. 
These and the parapet are much poorer than the rest of the 
work, and seem to indicate a falling-off of funds by the time this 
level was reached. 

The font is a circular one of Transitional-Norman type, orna- 
mented with large foliage around the upper part. There are foot 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A, 451 

ornaments at the angles of the square base ; altogether a rather 
poor piece of work of the period. A seventeenth century cover of 
«ix rude scrolls around a central turned shaft seems to suit it well 
(Plate XX.). 

There are fifteen good Jacobean pews, also a plain oak chest 
inscribed "JOHN reeves church : warden 1699" on the end. 

The pulpit is a well-preserved specimen of An^^lo- Italian Ke- 
naissance, having large panels with carved borders, and a frieze 
in the more ordinary Elizabethan manner — the door remains. The 
reading-desk has two similar panels. Over the south doorway 

inside, on part of a traceried head, is cut p a supported by two 
scrolls. 

In 1857 the sum of £1000 was spent on the fabric, £500 of 
which was contributed by the then rector — the Kev. W. F. Harrison, 
who was killed through a fall from his horse on the road to Broad 
Hinton, at the spot now marked by a stone at the roadside. 



Sir Stephen Glynne's notes on this Church, taken 29th April, 
1850, are as follows : — 

\_Wintcr'bowrnc Basset — ^S*. Catherine. This Church has a nave 
with north aisle and transept, chancel, west tower, and south porch. 
Tho north front has an irregular appearance, from being formed 
into two gables (besides that of the transept) — the western con- 
taining a small two-light window of Third pointed character, 
the other a door slightly ogeed having bold foliage continued down 
the arch mouldings. The tower is Third pointed and of tine 
masonry, embattled, having an octagonal turret at the north-east, 
S(|uare in the lower part, corner buttresses, and small pinnacles 
uj)on the lowest set-offs. The belfry windows of two lights with 
some stone lattice-work. The west window of three lights, the west 
door ofjee and la1)oled. 'J'he arcade on the north of tlio nave is of 
1 liiHM' ])l;un ])ointed arches, with mouldings continued down ihc piers, 
without capitals, probably 'i'liird iioiiiU'd. ( »n the south of 
\}w. nav(^- is a large four-liglil s(|uarc-Iicadcd window anil anotlier 

\ thrc(^ liuhts. The south door is j.lain and laic; the outi'r uno uf 
the south ponli is lal-clliMl. Tlicrc is a small are'li I'r.'m the aisle 



452 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

of the nave into the transept. The latter has a three-light Middle 
pointed window, having shafts internally with foliated capitals and 
a hood. Under this is a fine sepulchral arch with ogee crocketed 
canopy and good mouldings. The chancel seems to be of somewhat 
debased character. Its arch is a tall one of Third pointed 
style, upon shafts. On each side of the chancel are two windows 
of two lights, which have a Flamboyant look, and contain some 
pieces of stained glass. The east window is square-headed of three 
lights, the lights wide and trefoiled. There is an ogee niche 
on the south, cinquefoiled, with shelf and octagonal piscina. There 
is a priest's door on the south. The screen is of debased character 
and there are some screened old pews. The font is circular. The 
tower arch is a tall pointed one,] 

The Church of S. Mary Magdalene, Winterbourne 
MoNKTON, Wilts, 

In plan — chancel with modern vestry on the north, nave with 
south porch, and a timber tower over the west bay. 

This Church was re-built in 1878 with the exception of parts of 
the north-east and west walls of chancel and porch; Mr. W. 
Butterfield was the architect, and the outlay was £2000. 

The old features reinstated are the moulded arch to south porch^ 
of fifteenth century date, with diagonal terminals to label; some 
of the jamb stones and the label of the fourteenth century inner 
doorway ; the coeval doorway with good arch in the north wall, 
the jambs of which have been lowered; the east window of the 
chancel which has been re-built at a higher level ; the head of the 
south window of sanctuary, the trefoil arches of which have the ogee 
tendency of the late fourteenth century ; in the north wall of the 
nave the three-light square-headed late Tudor window, with tran- 
som, eastward of the door; the jambs of a single-light window 
westward of the door; and the jambs and muUions of the three- 
light window in the west wall. 

The chancel arch has been re-built but much old work in arch 
and jamb remains. It is of thirteenth century date, the arch of 



By C. E. PontAng, F.S.A. 45:^ 

two orders of chamfers; the inner order, unusually wide, carried 
on interesting moulded corbels following the line of the chamfer. 
An unusual feature of the interior is the three-bay reredos on 
each side of the chancel arch. The one on the north side retains 
its fourteenth century ogee arches over the outer bays llin. wide 
with small chamfer on the edges of arches and jambs ; the central 
bay, 17in. wide, has modern arch of simple trefoil and mullioiis 
with a larger chamfer. The reredos on the south side is a modern 
copy of the one thus restored on the north, except that all the 
chamfers are of the larger kind. I have no doubt that this was 
an intentional variation l)y the architect, and that the reredos 
on both sides had arches like the outer ones on the north. The 
piscina for the north altar is in the east wall (the north jamb of 
chancel arch) and that for the south in the south wall of the nave ; 
both have trefoil arches and are coeval with the old work of the 
reredos. 

Tfie timber tower takes the place of an old one ; it is supported at 
one side on the west wall of the nave, and on the east by two old 
posts consisting of trunks of trees I7in. in diameter with the bark 
simply peeled off, which rise boldly from the floor among the seats 
The braces are modern additions. 

An old photograph in the vestry shows a Queen Anne gallery 

between these posts, and the indications of the floor beams exist 

on the latter. From the same source we find that the old roof of 

the nave was of flat pitch ; that there were good pews with little 

i turned spindles around the top, and a massive altar rail with 

balusters of the hour-glass pattern. 

j The font is a bt^autiful one of the twelfth century — a circular 

' bowl iM't. Oin. diameter at the top with a l)and of chevron carried 

round; the lower [)art is worked like a scalloped capital, willi 

I neck-mould at the bottom edge ; l)etween the rolls are the nail-head 

I and leaf ornauKMit; of late N'orman worlc, and tho figure of a man 

I is carved on th(3 north face. The u[)[)er edge has an unusual 

moulding of later typ(^ and l)ut for the old |)iece. which has botMi 

M'fully prt'siu'Vt^iL it iui'j;hL havti l»e(3n tak'on as niodorn. A picro 

I of th(i howl has h(MMi hidkon away hy the iron hinge; ihi' haso is 

TTindorn. 



454 Notes on the Churches of Ashley, Berwick Bassett, etc. 

Built into the north-east quoin of the nave, outside, are four 
pieces of a coffin slab having a plain incised cross with stepped base, 

A nice wrought-iron hour-glass stand is fixed to the wall by the 
pulpit, and bears the legend 1627 B.L. K.S. K.P. 

In the vestry is an oak table inscribed along the front rail :— 
DEDCT (sic.) GVALTERVS. SLOPER. Also on the left end 16 and 
on the right 78. There is also a long plain oak chest after the 
seventeenth century manner with old ironwork. 

In the tower are four bells bearing the following legends : — 

1. THOMAS PUENELL AND AMBROSE SPENSER. CHURCHWARDENS 

1665. 

2. ANNO DOMINI. 1641. I.L. 

3. SEEKE THE LORD. I.W. 1617. I.H. S.P. 

4. J. WARNEU & SONS LONDON 1877. 

In the churchyard at the east end of the chancel is a large rough 
sarsen stone which was placed, at his request, over the grave of a 
former Vicar, the Rev. Thomas Thorold, buried Feb. 23rd, 1747-8.' 




Asiii.i:v. SoL'iii Dooi.-. 



PUitc I 



It 





Ashley. Piscina. 



Plate II. 




Clyffe Pypard. Village Street. 



Plate IV. 





C I \ 1 I 1-: 1 ^ I'Ai.'i). Tow j-.K. 



Plate V. 





!•: I'M'MCI). I 




Clyffe Pypard. Pulpit, 1629. 



Plate VIII. 





Cl.N 111-. P\ I'AK- 



KV^M. 



riiit.- /.v. 




Clyffe Pypard. Monument of Thomas Spaceman. 




Clyffe Pypard, Recumbent Effigy. 



Plate X. 





C"i \i I1-: I^Ni'AKM). I\()()i) ScK'i:i:\. 



Plate XI. 



w 




Lydiard Tregoze. Screen. 



Plate XIV. 




Lydiard Tregoze. Monument of Edward St. John, 1645. Plate XVI. 




dTi<i:(;()/.i:. Monl mi:\ loi- Sue John S i . .I.min and I lis T\\ o \\i\ i s. ItvU. PuU^ X \' 1 1 





WiNTERBOURNE BaSSETT. FoNT AND NORTH DOOR. 




WiNTERBOURNE MONKTON, LOOKING WeST, SHOWING SUPPORTS OF TURRET. Plate XX 



455 



NOTES. 

Bronze Objects not included in the list in Wilts 
Arch. Mag*., xxxvii., 117 

]5ronze looped Palstave, plain, 3iin. long x l^in. in width of edge, found 
at Yarnbury Castle several years ago. In possession (1911) of Mr. V. 
Moore, of Wilton. Drawing of it in Devizes Museum Library. 

Bronze socketed gouge, a slender perfect specimen, 3^in. long, found at 
Upper Upliam, 1911. In possession of .Mr. A. D. Passmore, of Swindon. 

Bronze socketed looped celt, a fine specimen in fine preservation found at 
Cliarnage, near Mere, 1911, and in the possession of Mr. A. Pt. White, 
of that place. A stout large Celt, 4^in. long, the blade 2in. wide. 
Three ribs in relief run half-way down the blade from the socket. It 
is much like Fig. 126 in Evans' Bronze Implements. A drawing of it 
has been placed in Devizes Museum Library. 

Small triangular Knife-Dagger. Among a small collection of objects of 
antiquity purchased by Mr. and ^Irs. B. H. Cunnington and presented 
by them to the Museum, in February, 1912, are the principal objects 
mentioned as having been collected by J. Stoughton Money, F.S.A., and 
as being afterwards exhibited at the Marlborough Meeting of 18.j9 by 
Mr. C. May, of that place, in Wilts Arch. Mag., vi., 259. One of these 
is the object described as an "Arrow-head of bronze from a barrow 
near Charlton, Donhead, Wilts, opened 1832." This I noted in my 
"List of Bronze Objects found in Wiltshire" (IF.^. J/., xxxvii., 123) 
as No. 46 in the list, expressing the opiuiou that it was probably a 
knife-dagger. It proves to be an exceedingly perfect exami)le of the 
small plain triangular knife-dagger with pointed blade, broad at the 
handle end, retaining two of its rivets, the third and centre rivet hole 
having been broken away. The blade is plain, but has a broad bevel 
on each side. The mark of the handle on the blade shows a line straight 
across, without the semi-lunar indentation which is seen on so many 
of the larger dagger blades. The edge of the blade, which is singularly 
well preserved, is still sharp enough to cut with. Its length is 2^in., 
with a breadth at the handle end of li^in. 

Bronze socketed looped Celt, said to have been found at "Blood Hill,' 
Salisbury Plain, and to have been sold March "jtli, 1902, by Mr. Greene, 
school inspector, to the dealer from whom C.mon (rreenwell i)urcha.sed 
it, in whose collection it now is. It is an unusual chisel-shaped im- 
l)lement, widening out without mouldings at the socket, and very 
slightly at the cutting edge, being narrowest in the middle. Canon 
(Jreunweli, to whom 1 am indebted for the knowledge of this celt, 
describes it as " very imorly made," and as having upon it on both sides 
some very faint decoration marks resembling the letter V or V. 
"A Bit of Old r>rass," unspeeitied, found in a barrow to south of 01di)ury 
Camp (CalstomO with skeleton and drinking '"up. Probably a knife- 
dagger. ir..l..l/., xxiii., 2ir). K. H. C;oL)D.\iti). 
VOL. X.XXVII. — NO. (XVII. 2 



456 Notes. 



Hanging^ Langford. During 1911 Miss M. Graham, of Dinton, 
found in rabbit diggings within the area of the earthworks at Hanging 
Langford, a tithing of Steeple Langford, the following objects, of 
Romano-British age : — a bronze bow hinge pin fibula with T-shaped 
head, and plain rounded strong bow with slight furrow up its centre ; 
a portion of the bronze bow of a hinge pin fibula of flat thin bronze 
with three furrows ; and part of what is apparently a small iron 
penannular ring fibula, the perfect end of which has a knob. In addition 
to these a British coin of base silver or mixed white metal was found. 
It almost exactly resembles a coin in the British Museum figured in 
Hawkins' Silver Coins of England, Plate I., fig. 5, having on the oh^ 
the degenerate remains of a laureate head, and on the rev. a disjointed 
horse with pellets above it. Several examples of this coin were found 
together at Portsmouth. All these objects remain in the possession of 
Miss Graham, and drawings of them by the Rev. C. V. Goddard have 
been placed in the Society's Library. E. H. Goddaed. 

All Cannings Rectory. On the wall plate of the south garden 
front of the old part of the Rectory are two iron plates bearing in 
large raised letters the following inscriptions :— 

P.B. ANO DNI 

MH m^ 

EATTO 

[Robert Byng, not for himself, erected this building 1642.] 
Robert Byng was presented to the Rectory by Henry Byng, Sergeant- 
at-Law, who perhaps held the presentation for a turn, in 1625. He 
was ejected during the Commonwealth. On the north wall of the 
nave of Potterne Church is a memorial Tablet recording the Wray 
family, one of them being a " grandson of Thomas Byng, some years- 
Major of the Wiltshire Militia, and great grandson of the Rev^. Robert- 
Byng, D.D., formerly Rector of All Cannings, of which he was- 
deprived by his adherence to King Charles, died before his restoration, 
and was buried in St. John's Church, Devizes." 

In Wilts Arch. Mag., ii., 233, Mr. E. Kite mentions a Robert Byng,. 
D.D., sometime Rector of Devizes, who died Feb. 8th, 1658. Qry. the 
same man ? Over this memorial tablet at Potterne is now a hatch- 
ment which was formerly fixed to the chancel ceiling, was removed 
in 1872 to the belfry, was afterwards placed in the vestry, and has- 
just been restored to the nave. It bears the Byng arms and is said to 
have the date 1782 upon it. The heraldry is described in Wilts Arch. 
Mag., xxiii., 299. There is a tradition that the Byngs or Wrays lived 
in the old house at Whistley, in Potterne, afterwards inhabited by 
the Rev. Henry Kent, D.D. H. E. Medlicott. 

Silver Seal found at Potterne. in the account of thi& 

seal which has lately been acquired by the British Museum, the 
translation of the legend " Que tibi lego lege " is given as "what I 






Notes. 457 

read to you, read." Mr. A. S. Maskelyne, however, suggests that it is 
more likely to be